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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

My grandson is¬†a missionary in Mexico, in a very poor village. Their rentals are weird also. His wife requested my Dressing recipe to make for Thanksgiving. She had to make it without sage, because no store sold it. ūüė≥ Dressing (stuffing) without sage is..is..unspeakable! ūüėĀ That would be like calling a cone full of pudding an¬†ice cream cone.

 

I'll check for sage next time I go to La Colonia.  Can't get mustard seeds here,. but have heard that it's possible to get them in Managua.  The plant place has thyme plants occasionally, haven't noticed sage one way or the other.  Rosemary plants are common enough -- I have one now.  There are some native American sages, don't know how they'd do for an herb, or if they grow as far south as Mexico.   Here, we can find wild hot peppers and achiote. 

 

Jinotega isn't a particularly poor town and we were getting few and few short term missionaries as it began to look more and more like a Latino neighborhood in the DC suburbs. 

 

Funniest thing I've heard about Nicaragua is that Cubans come here to shop in Managua before Christmas. 

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6 hours ago, gvallee said:

I used to have a romantic chocolate box thatch cottage in Normandy, as a weekend house from the UK.  There was a park, two fields, a river through the land. It was magic. I swore I would never-ever-ever-ever sell it. Then came the chance to live in Australia... and I did sell it. It was built around an old cider press. The staircase was a piece of the corkscrew press itself.. 

 

What a beautiful house, must have been a wrench to let it go. However better to have loved and lost etc

 

We toyed with the idea of buying a property in France, but it remained just a dream. The 300 mile drive to the south coast of the UK on crowded roads  being just one significant reason not to. In the end we suffered towing a tiny caravan all that way and beyond, but June in France was lovely, weather generally pleasant and the off the beaten track  campsites not crowded. Some great memories over the best part of a decade.

Edited by Bryan
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28 minutes ago, Bryan said:

 

What a beautiful house, must have been a wrench to let it go. However better to have loved and lost etc

 

We toyed with the idea of buying a property in France, but it remained just a dream. The 300 mile drive to the south coast of the UK on crowded roads  being just one significant reason not to. In the end we suffered towing a tiny caravan all that way and beyond, but June in France was lovely, weather generally pleasant and the off the beaten track  campsites not crowded. Some great memories over the best part of a decade.

 

You're quite right Bryan. One thing I will never miss are the bi-monthly ferry crossings. We used to catch the Friday overnight Portsmouth/Le Havre ferry. That was OK. But for the return, we had to leave the property at 2pm on Sundays, which was a wrench on a sunny day. On either side of the Channel, the drive was a mere 45mn which was good. I left France so long ago, now I don't know but at the time properties were super cheap compared to the UK.

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On 24/01/2021 at 22:08, MDM said:

 

I know. My great uncle who lived in Beara was similar. He refused mains electricity. I can recall visiting as a kid in the early 60s and they were using oil lamps. He was not a man to argue with. Small in stature but very fierce. I get my middle name from him I believe. 

 

PS. Just in case of misinterpretation,¬†The reference to English hippies was not a slight in any way by the way. When I lived in Ireland I used to travel about quite a bit in the west and south and befriended lots of so-called hippies of various nationalities (Irish, English, Welsh, Dutch, German ...)¬†living the rural lifestyle. My wife and son are English as well¬†ūüėÄ

 

 

Even our traffic regulations are a bit eccentric down here.¬†ūüôā¬†

Andy.

 

different-speed-limit-signs-on-the-same-road-2E4M9E3.jpg

 

 

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3 hours ago, aphperspective said:

 

 

Even our traffic regulations are a bit eccentric down here.¬†ūüôā¬†

Andy.

 

ūüôāūüôā¬†Makes perfect sense, if you drive on the wrong side of the road you should do so more slowly!

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21 minutes ago, Bryan said:

ūüôāūüôā¬†Makes perfect sense, if you drive on the wrong side of the road you should do so more slowly!

I did ask a guy out for a walk why the difference in speed limits " So the holiday makers don't get confused". Moving swiftly onwards.....

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5 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Moving swiftly onwards

How swiftly, though........?:blink:

Edited by spacecadet
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I got my first jab/shot/vaccination this morning.

 

It was AstraZeneca, the Oxford vaccine. Two 25 minute taxi rides were inconvenient and costly, but the NHS temporary operation set up in this Village Hotel Pharmacy was very impressive. Very.

 

I'm lucky to be here in the UK with the NHS on my side. 

 

Edo

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I met my new primary care doctor today and I'm delighted to say I really like him. I think he is gay, though I could be wrong. Anyway, very easy to talk to and apparently it won't be difficult to schedule appointments. I had been with the same doctor for 30 years so it was rather nerve-racking to look for someone new... especially during a pandemic. I wonder what he looks like without a mask... Hmmm. Strange times.

 

Paulette

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7 hours ago, NYCat said:

I met my new primary care doctor today and I'm delighted to say I really like him. I think he is gay, though I could be wrong. Anyway, very easy to talk to and apparently it won't be difficult to schedule appointments. I had been with the same doctor for 30 years so it was rather nerve-racking to look for someone new... especially during a pandemic. I wonder what he looks like without a mask... Hmmm. Strange times.

 

Paulette

I had to do that when I moved. It’s tough finding a new family doctor, dentists and specialists. I had been with my Oklahoma doctor for many years, also. So far I like them all, but my cardiologist will never get me to take another chemical stress test.  
 

I managed to see their faces before all this hit, except for the dentist. I still have to find an Ophthalmologist.

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In March I will be two weeks out from the second dose of vaccine so I will schedule medical visits I've been putting off. I think five appointments in one month is going to feel like an awful lot. A wonder which ones I can delay a little longer. March is going to be medical month.

 

Paulette

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On 27/01/2021 at 13:03, Ed Rooney said:

I got my first jab/shot/vaccination this morning.

 

It was AstraZeneca, the Oxford vaccine. Two 25 minute taxi rides were inconvenient and costly, but the NHS temporary operation set up in this Village Hotel Pharmacy was very impressive. Very.

 

I'm lucky to be here in the UK with the NHS on my side. 

 

Edo

 

I was given the Pfizer. So there.ūü§ď

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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29 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

I was given the Pfizer. So there.ūü§ď

 

Allan

 

 

Really? Hmm. They make Lipitor, a drug I hate. I hear the new Russian jab turns you into a Putin supporter. 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Really? Hmm. They make Lipitor, a drug I hate. I hear the new Russian jab turns you into a Putin supporter. 

Well, the Moderna turns you into a hipster.

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This weekend is the RSPB garden birdwatch event, when you are asked to spend one hour counting the birds that alight in your garden and report the results back. It was too cold to be motionless outside so I had to observe from a bedroom window. I've done this for a few years, and, in our north facing back garden, have previously not registered a single bird.

 

This time it appeared to be going the same way, but then I noticed a blurred shape passing close to the window and twigged that it might be an inhabitant of our bird box. Sure enough it was a blue tit sussing out a possible nest. There were two of them, but I only saw one alight at any time, and it was impossible to know which was which, so in the rules of the game, that counts as just one.  On two occasions a pigeon settled on the neighbour's roof and then flew just above my head to presumably alight on our roof, I think I'll count that one as well.

 

I might spend an hour at the allotment tomorrow in the relative warmth of the greenhouse, should do a whole lot better there!

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We have a Snowy Owl in Central Park and we Big City folk get VERY excited about nature.

 

A half-dozen park rangers flocked to Manhattan’s Central Park on Wednesday to control the crowd. Photographers moved in, while onlookers bundled up in hats, gloves and face masks gathered around. The rangers told everyone not to shout, use flash photography or deploy drones to get shots. 

At the center of it all was a small white-faced owl standing in a ballfield.

 

Paulette

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2 hours ago, NYCat said:

We have a Snowy Owl in Central Park and we Big City folk get VERY excited about nature.

 

A half-dozen park rangers flocked to Manhattan’s Central Park on Wednesday to control the crowd. Photographers moved in, while onlookers bundled up in hats, gloves and face masks gathered around. The rangers told everyone not to shout, use flash photography or deploy drones to get shots. 

At the center of it all was a small white-faced owl standing in a ballfield.

 

Paulette

That’s so cool! And so understandable about the excitement. My nephew has a farm in Oklahoma about 65 miles from me. I went down once to shoot the resident Great Horned owl family on his property. At the time, a male, female and female fledgling. I was beyond excited. But I screwed up big time. I got there, got out my Fuji X-T2 and took out my 100-400 lens, only to find I had put my 50-135 in my bag instead. I can’t believe I did that. Excitement, I guess. I made do the best I could. The sky wasn’t the best, either.

This is the female fledgling.

 

PHWF1H.jpg
 

The male

 

PHWF1T.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
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16 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Really? Hmm. They make Lipitor, a drug I hate. I hear the new Russian jab turns you into a Putin supporter. 

 

Six days in and no problems so far.ūüĎć

 

Allan

 

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16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Well, the Moderna turns you into a hipster.

 

Except for the outfits, the tattoos, drugs, and bad attitude, I thought I was a hipster. 

 

I remember the term as jazz slang in the '50s. The only thing I had in common with those folks was the music. 

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Happy Birthday, Doug!

 

In Scotland, is 60 younger than in England? I was still a lad at 60. At 85 I still was feeling okay. At 86? I'm feeling new aches and pains in my old chronic aches and pains. 

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3 hours ago, Sultanpepa said:

It's my birthday. 

Mine 2 only 2 more years to qualify for the winter fuel allowance( which is allot in Ireland)¬†ūüôā

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1 hour ago, aphperspective said:

Mine 2 only 2 more years to qualify for the winter fuel allowance( which is allot in Ireland)¬†ūüôā

 

Happy Birthday to you too, Andy. 

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3 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Happy Birthday to you too, Andy. 

Thanks Edo got a few more years wisdom to catch you up. A quiet day due to lockdown but hopefully raise a jug later in the year.

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3 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Happy Birthday, Doug!

 

In Scotland, is 60 younger than in England? I was still a lad at 60. At 85 I still was feeling okay. At 86? I'm feeling new aches and pains in my old chronic aches and pains. 

 

As a doctor once told me. "Getting old is not good for you."

 

Allan

 

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