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Our car failed the MoT because the lacquer had fallen off the indicator bulbs. I replaced them, but I've just tinted the old ones with an orange marker pen. They are now the spares and I have saved about £1.96 which we will spend on booze and chocolate.

Edited by spacecadet
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45 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

We’ve got a good few inches of snow here in Oxford and plenty more to come by the looks of it. Might get the sledge out of the loft!! 

Snow here in West Cork for the first time since the last Meteor Strike! There is gridlock (5 cars) where drivers have stopped to look at a snow flake settled on the road. 😀

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1 hour ago, Thyrsis said:

We’ve got a good few inches of snow here in Oxford and plenty more to come by the looks of it. Might get the sledge out of the loft!! 

 

Just arrived home. Now just a few small snowflakes in the air. Here it settled at around 1.5", was hoping for more. 

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i'm getting my Covid vaccination tomorrow. Big surprise. I haven't had cancer for 20 years but I am still seeing a nurse-practitioner once a year so am still a patient at Sloan-Kettering. This morning I had an email that there was a message in my portal. I hate all these portals and internet stuff where I get lost and don't know how to get back but I am sure glad I went in. My email said the message was not important??? These computers don't know what they are talking about. They probably just opened this opportunity up and the only dates available were today and the next couple of days. I made my appointment for tomorrow. Yea!!! It is not a convenient location but who cares.

 

Paulette

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1 hour ago, sb photos said:

 

Just arrived home. Now just a few small snowflakes in the air. Here it settled at around 1.5", was hoping for more. 

After scraping the ice of the car windows it wouldn't start !  Same thing happened the other day, it took a jump start so first stop Halfords to get the battery tested, they said it was ok - guess it's just it's not getting used much nowadays.  Second stop home to get my snow gear and cameras as by that time it had started snowing.  Living on a fairly steep hill it seemed like ok now or not at all so popped to our local park.  Very thick snow and everything looked lovely, managed an hour or so before heading home and drying everything out.  It was good to see a few people out and enjoying themselves socially distanced.  It's a very big park so no problem.  Lots of snowmen suddenly appearing, good to see😁

It's still snowing here now, my chances of driving up our hill are now zero, already one car stuck and left.....

 

Carol

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4 hours ago, aphperspective said:

Snow here in West Cork for the first time since the last Meteor Strike! There is gridlock (5 cars) where drivers have stopped to look at a snow flake settled on the road. 😀


One of the human lefty liberal Guardian reader type of snowflake? Settling on the road. Unbelievable These people would live up your nose if they got a chance. Probably an English hippie. They are all over West Cork these days. 😎

Edited by MDM
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2 hours ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

After scraping the ice of the car windows it wouldn't start !  Same thing happened the other day, it took a jump start so first stop Halfords to get the battery tested, they said it was ok - guess it's just it's not getting used much nowadays.  Second stop home to get my snow gear and cameras as by that time it had started snowing.  Living on a fairly steep hill it seemed like ok now or not at all so popped to our local park.  Very thick snow and everything looked lovely, managed an hour or so before heading home and drying everything out.  It was good to see a few people out and enjoying themselves socially distanced.  It's a very big park so no problem.  Lots of snowmen suddenly appearing, good to see😁

It's still snowing here now, my chances of driving up our hill are now zero, already one car stuck and left.....

 

Carol

Did you charge it up after the test? The cold won't have helped, but occasional short runs are not enough. I give our battery a top-up charge for a day every three weeks without fail and haven't had a bad start since. Keeping it in a garage is cheating, I suppose, but it was  zero even in there the other day according to the car thermometer😮

Edited by spacecadet
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33 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Did you charge it up after the test? The cold won't have helped, but occasional short runs are not enough. I give our battery a top-up charge for a day every three weeks without fail and haven't had a bad start since. Keeping it in a garage is cheating, I suppose, but it was  zero even in there the other day according to the car thermometer😮

It only got charged when I went out and that wasn't too far  also so it's probably not enough, will see how it is in the morning and like you say give it full charge and/or phone my local garage as I think it's still under warranty, it did happen the other day also, again it only had a relatively short run.....ha ha keeping it in the garage no, no room even for dinky toy in there it's the other half's mancave😁

 

Thinking about it, it did happen in the summer and my local garage tested it and said it wasn't showing any faults - I would rather it did and get the battery replaced🙃

 

Carol

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6 hours ago, MDM said:


One of the human lefty liberal Guardian reader type of snowflake? Settling on the road. Unbelievable These people would live up your nose if they got a chance. Probably an English hippie. They are all over West Cork these days. 😎

Got a few eccentrics down here as you know, and not all English. My partner had an Uncle that lived out on The Mizen Peninsular near a village called Goleen. In 1979 when they finally got mains electricity to the area he refused to have it in the house saying "Its the devils work". Absolutely true as I stand or sit here.

Andy. 

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31 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Got a few eccentrics down here as you know, and not all English. My partner had an Uncle that lived out on The Mizen Peninsular near a village called Goleen. In 1979 when they finally got mains electricity to the area he refused to have it in the house saying "Its the devils work". Absolutely true as I stand or sit here.

Andy. 

 

I know. My great uncle who lived in Beara was similar. He refused mains electricity. I can recall visiting as a kid in the early 60s and they were using oil lamps. He was not a man to argue with. Small in stature but very fierce. I get my middle name from him I believe. 

 

PS. Just in case of misinterpretation, The reference to English hippies was not a slight in any way by the way. When I lived in Ireland I used to travel about quite a bit in the west and south and befriended lots of so-called hippies of various nationalities (Irish, English, Welsh, Dutch, German ...) living the rural lifestyle. My wife and son are English as well 😀

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Never thought for one minute a slight was intended. I think the reason we have more than of few oddballs down here plus your common or garden celebrity is that they just get treated as "normal" by everybody. People just get on with anybody. Long may it continue.

Andy. 

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28 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Never thought for one minute a slight was intended. I think the reason we have more than of few oddballs down here plus your common or garden celebrity is that they just get treated as "normal" by everybody. People just get on with anybody. Long may it continue.

Andy. 

 

No I didn't think you would think anything Andy from past conversations but I didn't want anyone else reading it to misinterpret. It happens online so easily. I would hate to be perceived as a nationalistic bigot, given my intense dislike of that sort of behaviour. 

 

When I first went to West Cork as a kid coming from Dublin, it used to amaze me how everyone was so friendly. And people still salute when you are driving despite how touristy it has become. 

 

It is my favourite place on Earth really - if only it didn't rain so much. I remember my father telling me he never saw snow as a child growing up in Beara until he moved to Dublin. There was a very rare really heavy snow in Beara in the winter of 2010-11  and they didn't know what to do as I doubt they have any machinery to deal with it as it so rare. 

Edited by MDM
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9 hours ago, aphperspective said:

Got a few eccentrics down here as you know, and not all English. My partner had an Uncle that lived out on The Mizen Peninsular near a village called Goleen. In 1979 when they finally got mains electricity to the area he refused to have it in the house saying "Its the devils work". Absolutely true as I stand or sit here.

Andy. 

 

When we bought our first house in West London in 1974 it still had all the original gas lighting and a ‘copper’ in the kitchen, and no bathroom. The old lady wouldn’t have the workmen in!  Spent 5 years renovating it before we moved to Oxfordshire  and started all over again renovating an old thatched cottage. 

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6 hours ago, Thyrsis said:

 

When we bought our first house in West London in 1974 it still had all the original gas lighting and a ‘copper’ in the kitchen, and no bathroom. The old lady wouldn’t have the workmen in!  Spent 5 years renovating it before we moved to Oxfordshire  and started all over again renovating an old thatched cottage. 

I used to have an old (very old) thatched cottage in Dorset. The deeds and records for the property went back hundreds of years, grade 2 listed. When we started renovating found an original Elizabethan window covered in the gable end. That promptly got a preservation order slapped on it by the council, found a flint lined well in the garden, that got a preservation order slapped on it by Dorchester museum, then founds bats roosting in the attic under the thatch so it became a registered bat roost!!! monitored by Dorset Bat protection Society.

Old buildings can be quickly loose the romantic idea of owning one.🙂

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3 hours ago, aphperspective said:

Old buildings can be quickly loose the romantic idea of owning one.

 

The houses in Philadelphia weren't that old, 18th or 19th century, but a friend said of those houses that it was like building a new house inside the old one. 

 

I had a 19th Century one. 

 

 

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12 hours ago, Thyrsis said:

 

When we bought our first house in West London in 1974 it still had all the original gas lighting and a ‘copper’ in the kitchen, and no bathroom. The old lady wouldn’t have the workmen in!  Spent 5 years renovating it before we moved to Oxfordshire  and started all over again renovating an old thatched cottage. 

 

Similar experience at a similar time. We bought a stone built terraced house without a bathroom, and no piped hot water. Had to use the local bathhouse to take a bath. Horsehair ceilings etc. Cured me of the need to renovate, and with bairns on the way, we subsequently bought new houses. Our younger son is clearly a chip off the old blockhead, as he's just about finished rebuilding a three storey Victorian terraced house that had been laid waste as a rental house of multiple occupancy, including cockroaches. Shameful to think of people living in those conditions in this country in the 21st century.  Nice house now mind.

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28 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

They don’t build things to last these days like in the old.

 

Mheh, anything that didn't last, we don't know about.  Nicaragua has many two room brick houses (solid brick with rebar reinforcing) that are built to last, but also built because people expect that their grandchildren will also be poor.  And some houses are build of wood and won't last.  My Philly house was built out of brick seconds, and the plumbing was crap, and some of the jousts weren't in great shape.  Had to also do work on the stairs.  Other things were up to the new landlord when I left.  New landlord took it over as a rental and had a crew who could do the rest of the work.   It was a worker's cottage -- brewery had been at the end of the street, and that was gone.

 

Current rental house is probably early to mid 20th century, split into three smaller houses.  Cinder block.  I got the garage part and a back two story set of two bedrooms.  A  study and kitchen are on the ground floor behind the garage turned livign room, and there's a second floor studio over the kitchen.  Central courtyard has a shed addition for a toilet and shower, now toilet and washing machine.  Cement stucco inside and out.  Wooden floor on the second floor studio, probably wood under the tiled upstairs bedroom.  Whole different set of priorities about houses here.   Houses often get rebuilt and across the street, the owners went up a story and then have a rooftop space above that.  Ground floor is now a two car garage, parked one behind the other.   Someone added a toilet and shower in each of the two back bedrooms, no walls, just shower curtains on poles.

 

My impression is that Nicaraguan houses are works in progress. 

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13 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

 

Mheh, anything that didn't last, we don't know about.  Nicaragua has many two room brick houses (solid brick with rebar reinforcing) that are built to last, but also built because people expect that their grandchildren will also be poor.  And some houses are build of wood and won't last.  My Philly house was built out of brick seconds, and the plumbing was crap, and some of the jousts weren't in great shape.  Had to also do work on the stairs.  Other things were up to the new landlord when I left.  New landlord took it over as a rental and had a crew who could do the rest of the work.   It was a worker's cottage -- brewery had been at the end of the street, and that was gone.

 

Current rental house is probably early to mid 20th century, split into three smaller houses.  Cinder block.  I got the garage part and a back two story set of two bedrooms.  A  study and kitchen are on the ground floor behind the garage turned livign room, and there's a second floor studio over the kitchen.  Central courtyard has a shed addition for a toilet and shower, now toilet and washing machine.  Cement stucco inside and out.  Wooden floor on the second floor studio, probably wood under the tiled upstairs bedroom.  Whole different set of priorities about houses here.   Houses often get rebuilt and across the street, the owners went up a story and then have a rooftop space above that.  Ground floor is now a two car garage, parked one behind the other.   Someone added a toilet and shower in each of the two back bedrooms, no walls, just shower curtains on poles.

 

My impression is that Nicaraguan houses are works in progress. 

My grandson is a missionary in Mexico, in a very poor village. Their rentals are weird also. His wife requested my Dressing recipe to make for Thanksgiving. She had to make it without sage, because no store sold it. 😳 Dressing (stuffing) without sage is..is..unspeakable! 😁 That would be like calling a cone full of pudding an ice cream cone.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Its amazing how the old techniques stand the test of time, The roof beams Oak with Ash pegs never had a nail in it. The walls were Cob, which was horse hair,straw,trodden chalk and flint, and that old cottage was dead square to within 1/2 inch in length and width. The entrance floor stones were originaly over 3" thick worn down by the thousands of feet over the Eons of years, and the Thatch only needed the top layer renewing very 20 years or so (Norfolk Reed). I was told by a Thatcher the whole roof could last over 100 years depending on the weather.

Couldn't buy anything in B&Q for it though.😁  

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1 hour ago, Bryan said:

 

Similar experience at a similar time. We bought a stone built terraced house without a bathroom, and no piped hot water. Had to use the local bathhouse to take a bath. Horsehair ceilings etc. Cured me of the need to renovate, and with bairns on the way, we subsequently bought new houses. 

 

First child was born at the beginning of our second renovation. She learned to crawl on her hands and feet, not knees, amongst the rubble! We moved again twice after that, extending each property,  until we settled in our current house in 1987. Can’t see us moving again, but who knows........

 

 

 

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I used to have a romantic chocolate box thatch cottage in Normandy, as a weekend house from the UK.  There was a park, two fields, a river through the land. It was magic. I swore I would never-ever-ever-ever sell it. Then came the chance to live in Australia... and I did sell it. It was built around an old cider press. The staircase was a piece of the corkscrew press itself.

 

But what a nightmare for weekend visits only. There was always some kind of problems. The plumbing had frozen and was leaking, a tree had come down, a pine martin had dug a hole in the thatch roof, the cows from the next field had invaded again and destroyed the fish pond. It also tried to kill me twice. Once the wooden bridge over the river collapsed underneath me while I was holding a sharp knife which ended up pointing an inch from my heart. The second time, there was a problem with the fireplace, I woke up in the middle of the night with a splitting headache and noticed thick smoke. I couldn't open any windows as they were all jammed with the difference in temperature, the door was locked and I couldn't find the key in the thick smoke. 

 

Anyway, the first image licensed for $300 to an American magazine. 

 

ADB4FH.jpg

 

ADB4FY.jpg

 

B6GW1F.jpg

 

 

B6H41C.jpg

 

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Come the Winter very bloody rodent for miles around made their way back into the cottage. Mice would climb the out walls into the attic, sounded like a herd of horses running around above the bedroom, much to the annoyance of my 2 Siamese cats. A hair line crack in the chimney brickwork up in the attic allowed the resident bats to pop out of the massive fireplace at regular intervals into the living room, (more annoyed cats). One morning the oil fired boiler would not start because a Wren had got through the flue grill and made its nest around the burner while we were away.

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5 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Come the Winter very bloody rodent for miles around made their way back into the cottage. Mice would climb the out walls into the attic, sounded like a herd of horses running around above the bedroom, much to the annoyance of my 2 Siamese cats. A hair line crack in the chimney brickwork up in the attic allowed the resident bats to pop out of the massive fireplace at regular intervals into the living room, (more annoyed cats). One morning the oil fired boiler would not start because a Wren had got through the flue grill and made its nest around the burner while we were away.

 

We had bats roosting behind the shutters along with swarms of ladybirds. I once put my hand inside a cupboard in the kitchen to grab a plate. A mouse did a somersault and landed on my hand. Once when we entered the cottage, my OH said 'oh nice smell of lavender'. It was a decomposed mouse....

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