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10 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

Wall to wall glorious sunshine over here Edo, perishing cold and a biting wind mind.

 

Thursday morning we had sleet early morning, the first of this winter.  It settled on my cars windows and then slowly slid down. Friday morning the heaviest frost I've seen for some time, then bright sun but very cold. Yesterday evening terrible driving conditions on the A41 where it is higher around Tring, sleet and for a while was driving into hypnotic snow. It was extremely cold, but wet, nothing settled. Shame my camera kit was in the boot plus there were noticeable smears on the inside of the windscreen, must clean it today. Sunday snow predicted, should be an interesting day.

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16 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

The version I'm getting has the second shot 3 to 4 weeks after the first and I'm properly scheduled at this point.

 

Paulette

 

If I remember correctly we were supposed to have the second jab in about four weeks but in an effort to get some protection to most of the population it was proposed that the second jab could wait for three months. Just heard on the news on radio that now someone is suggesting the second jab should now be given in six weeks.

 

Make up your minds dolts.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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5 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

Thursday morning we had sleet early morning, the first of this winter.  It settled on my cars windows and then slowly slid down. Friday morning the heaviest frost I've seen for some time, then bright sun but very cold. Yesterday evening terrible driving conditions on the A41 where it is higher around Tring, sleet and for a while was driving into hypnotic snow. It was extremely cold, but wet, nothing settled. Shame my camera kit was in the boot plus there were noticeable smears on the inside of the windscreen, must clean it today. Sunday snow predicted, should be an interesting day.

Same here Steve, snow is predicted for me also tomorrow, I hope it does I love taking snow pictures, fingers crossed.

 

Other half had his jab yesterday at Batchwood Hall, St. Albans it was superb organisation and although he was only there for a few minutes I did manage a few shots with the RX100 nobody seemed to mind.  I think it will be a while before I get my jab😉

 

Here's to snow tomorrow 😁

 

Carol

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15 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

If I remember correctly we were supposed to have the second jab in about four weeks but in an effort to get some protection to most of the population it was proposed that the second jab could wait for three months. Just heard on the news on radio that now someone is suggesting the second jab should now be given in six weeks.

 

Make up your minds dolts.

 

Allan

 

Don't even get me started on that !🙃

 

Carol

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7 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Perfect description. That's exactly what struck me right away -- the brilliant whites and blue shift. It's amazing how over the years we get used to stumbling about in a dreary, tobacco-tinted world. Can't believe how much you had to pay. 😮

 

Basically it was a choice between paying or not getting the op done. A few years before and it would have been free on the NHS but continual underfunding of this magnificent organisation meant that the criteria for having the op done had changed. This is how the NHS deals with the funding cutbacks which were continual over many years since 2010 - they change the criteria (raise the bar) for referrals and operations so people have to pay for private care for many procedures that used to be free. In any case it was the correct decision for me as the benefits of near-perfect eyesight are impossible to measure financially.

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34 minutes ago, MDM said:

the benefits of near-perfect eyesight are impossible to measure financially.

I agree they are considerable, but it depends on whether or not you have £5000 to spare!

Edited by spacecadet
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43 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

If I remember correctly we were supposed to have the second jab in about four weeks but in an effort to get some protection to most of the population it was proposed that the second jab could wait for three months. Just heard on the news on radio that now someone is suggesting the second jab should now be given in six weeks.

 

Make up your minds dolts.

 

Allan

 

 

A couple of days ago our governor was carrying on about not wanting vaccine sitting in freezers waiting for the second dose and saying we should just use everything and hope for more vaccine in time for the second dose. His most recent email was assuring people who have had the first dose that they shouldn't worry. ...."New Yorkers who have already received their first dose do not have to worry that they will not be able to get their second dose. Second dose allocation is a separate process, and we always ensure there are enough second doses to complete vaccination for those who received the first dose." ......He must have had a deluge of email from people worried about the second dose. In any case, we are told we will have to continue taking precautions even after vaccination. There is a lot they don't know.

 

Paulette

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1 minute ago, spacecadet said:

I agree they are considerable, but it depends on whether or not you have £5000 to spare!

 

I am not loaded.. If I had to borrow it I would have done. The NHS has been seriously decimated and it was either spend the money or live with poor eyesight that was continuing to deteriorate. So I invested in my health. If you own a decent house in London then you are most probably worth a lot more than me. It's all about priorities I guess.

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4 minutes ago, MDM said:

If you own a decent house in London

I don't.

It wouldn't be about priorities, it would be about not having £5000 or the ability to borrow it. I would have to wait.

Just another viewpoint.

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6 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

I don't.

It wouldn't be about priorities, it would be about not having £5000.

 

OK. I can't argue with that. You may be confronted with a similar choice at some point and it may be that you have to borrow then or live with poor eyesight if that is not possible. Getting lens replacements on the NHS these days requires one to have extremely poor sight. 

 

EDIT - there may be a post code thing here of course but that was the situation in Cambridgeshire in 2016 and it doesn't get better.

Edited by MDM
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6 hours ago, MDM said:

 

 

OK. I can't argue with that. You may be confronted with a similar choice at some point and it may be that you have to borrow then or live with poor eyesight if that is not possible. Getting lens replacements on the NHS these days requires one to have extremely poor sight. 

 

EDIT - there may be a post code thing here of course but that was the situation in Cambridgeshire in 2016 and it doesn't get better.

 

My eyesight was deteriorating, but I could have gotten a new pair of goggles and waited a few years. However, lens replacement seemed the better option. In BC, you just have to go to your doctor and say that you would like a cataract operation, and it's a done deal. The procedure and good quality monofocal lenses are completely covered by the provincial healthcare plan. However, if you want a premium lens, such as one to correct astigmatism, you have to pay your surgeon more. This can open the door to a lot of dubious extra costs. As a result of this open-door policy, ophthalmologists are among the wealthiest medical specialists out there.

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Having watched Rick Stein cook tortilla wraps containing onion, apple and cheese I thought I'd have a go. 

 

The good news, it wasn't a complete disaster.

 

The bad news, I probably won't be doing it again. 

 

The better news, we're having another Xmas dinner tomorrow, to use up the stuff bought to feed the family.

Edited by Bryan
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2 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

My eyesight was deteriorating, but I could have gotten a new pair of goggles and waited a few years. However, lens replacement seemed the better option. In BC, you just have to go to your doctor and say that you would like a cataract operation, and it's a done deal. The procedure and good quality monofocal lenses are completely covered by the provincial healthcare plan. However, if you want a premium lens, such as one to correct astigmatism, you have to pay your surgeon more. This can open the door to a lot of dubious extra costs. As a result of this open-door policy, ophthalmologists are among the wealthiest medical specialists out there.


Quality of life is what really matters though and that improved massively for me after the op. In any case, one doesn’t know if one will actually be alive in a few years, more so now than before so one might as well see things clearly while one can. The deterioration is so gradual that it is not noticeable for a long time but the contrast after the op is unbelievable. 
 

I never got the impression that my surgeon was trying to upsell in any way either. I just got basic distance lenses which is what he recommended. I think I have minor astigmatism but I’m not sure if the lenses were corrected for that. I can’t remember the brand although I have a card somewhere with the lens ID in case there was ever a problem. 
 

 

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10 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

If I remember correctly we were supposed to have the second jab in about four weeks but in an effort to get some protection to most of the population it was proposed that the second jab could wait for three months. Just heard on the news on radio that now someone is suggesting the second jab should now be given in six weeks.

 

Make up your minds dolts.

 

Allan

 


 

These people are not dolts Allan. There is a big debate going on among expert scientists and the politicians who control the process of distribution about whether it is better to vaccinate a larger number of people with a first dose which should give some degree of immunity or to vaccinate smaller numbers twice at shorter intervals in accordance with how the tests were done. The British Medical Association have expressed serious doubts about the former process as it has not been tested and they are concerned about the gap between vaccinations if they go for higher numbers of initial ones. There are also potential problems with vaccine supply not to mention virus mutations and questions over efficacy against new variants. 
 

The fact is that science does not always have hard answers. This can be hard to accept for those not directly involved. Mix in politics and economics and you can have a right old mess. I would suggest that it is the propagators of conspiracy theories and those who deny science that should be the objects of your ire.
 

The fact that vaccines exist at all at this point is almost miraculous. We should be grateful. 

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On 22/01/2021 at 12:28, John Mitchell said:

I had cataract surgery (lens replacement) done on eye #2 earlier this week, and I can now see clearly with both eyes without glasses (a.k.a. "specs"), except for reading and computer work. The changes in brightness, clarity, and colour perception are dramatic, even shocking. It's like going directly from Kodachrome to digital. Even the gloomy Vancouver winter looks a bit less gloomy. It will be interesting to see what effects this change has on my photography and post-processing. If there is anyone out there hesitant about getting their cataracts fixed, don't be. The operation is a piece of cake.

So happy you’ve discovered a world of color and crispness again. Cataract advancement is so insidious. You don’t just wake up one day and see muddy colors. So it is rather shocking to have that all ripped away suddenly.
Did you realize how many whiskers you have and how sharp they are before you shave? Um..if you shave. OK. Just peek at your eyebrows and beard.
I kept washing my hair and slathering on conditioner because my hair looked so crisp. Then I realized the grass looked crisp, too, and I wasn’t going to condition that.

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On 22/01/2021 at 15:39, John Mitchell said:

 

Ouch! My operations were covered by the BC government. However, on the advice of my Ophthalmologist, I did shell out for some better quality monofocal lenses (for distance) than the ones provided by the gov. Do you need premium "Toric" lenses to correct astigmatism as well as cataracts? If so, they cost a lot more. I don't know what the situation is like in OZ, but eye surgeons here have a nasty habit of adding extra charges. Caveat emptor!

Medicare took care of mine and I did have the toric lenses that correct astigmatism. No extra charges for post op care. I could have gotten a pair of free reading glasses, but didn’t avail.

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On 22/01/2021 at 19:39, gvallee said:

 

My thoughts entirely. It was my first reaction. We checked them out and they have good reviews. They are the only outfit in Oz catering for uninsured people. I will have a thorough chat with them and follow my gut feelings. Perhaps I should choose to see it in GBP equivalent, it would be less painful ah ah.

 

I had comments once on this forum about the saturation of some of my pix. Perhaps I overdid it because of my eyes, it will be interesting to see after the op. I hope I won't recoil in horror at my uploads...

Gen, I taught myself to paint watercolor. A couple of years later I took a class, more to be around other painters. There was an elderly man there who kept painting muddy and off-color work. Toward the end of the lessons, I heard he had cataract surgery. I worked for an ophthalmologist at the time and instantly understood why his colors were off. The lens of your eye tend to cloud up in a brownish or brownish-amber color. Put on a pair of brownish-tinted sunglasses and see how they affect color perception.

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13 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Medicare took care of mine and I did have the toric lenses that correct astigmatism. No extra charges for post op care. I could have gotten a pair of free reading glasses, but didn’t avail.

 

In Australia, Medicare would also pay for a cataract op. But not if you're an expatriate on a retirement visa. 

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4 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Gen, I taught myself to paint watercolor. A couple of years later I took a class, more to be around other painters. There was an elderly man there who kept painting muddy and off-color work. Toward the end of the lessons, I heard he had cataract surgery. I worked for an ophthalmologist at the time and instantly understood why his colors were off. The lens of your eye tend to cloud up in a brownish or brownish-amber color. Put on a pair of brownish-tinted sunglasses and see how they affect color perception.

 

I'm looking forward to 'see' the difference. I just hope that all my editing has not been not too far off.

Edited by gvallee
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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Medicare took care of mine and I did have the toric lenses that correct astigmatism. No extra charges for post op care. I could have gotten a pair of free reading glasses, but didn’t avail.

 

That's a really good deal. Medical coverage differs from province to province in Canada. Here in BC, you have to pay extra for toric lenses (which I didn't need), however at a substantially reduced cost.  No charge for post-op care here either, but I did have to pay for additional pre-op (screening) tests and more complex calculations because I chose a "premium" aspheric monofocal lens that studies have shown develops fewer imperfections ("glistenings"). Hopefully the extra costs will pay off eventually.

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2 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

In Australia, Medicare would also pay for a cataract op. But not if you're an expatriate on a retirement visa. 

 

Bummer. I believe that it would be covered for all residents in Canada, but I don't know the details.

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3 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Bummer. I believe that it would be covered for all residents in Canada, but I don't know the details.

 

In Oz, it depends which visa you're on. When I was on a work visa, I was covered by Medicare. When I switched to Retirement Visa, I lost it. If and when (one can dream) I manage to get a permanent resident visa, then I will get it back. All very complicated. 

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Nipped out to the local Co-op store earlier, entering a 7am opening time. Was only a short walk, puddles had frozen solid and there was a thick frost. A great time for a walk. While I was there only one other person came in, to avoid the snow forecast for later. An ideal time to shop. I only shopped as we missed a few items off Saturday's click and collect Aldi order. 

 

I was just about to go out for a walk to pace out the length of some local flood defences. Now heavy snow has arrived and it's beginning to settle, wonderful. Just changing shoes and jacket into something more suitable. Unlike many years ago, we don't see heavy snow that much here. Yesterday while out for a walk it tried to snow, but all that came down was a combination of snow and hail, small hard round snow pellets. Now out into the snow.

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5 minutes ago, sb photos said:

Nipped out to the local Co-op store earlier, entering a 7am opening time. Was only a short walk, puddles had frozen solid and there was a thick frost. A great time for a walk. While I was there only one other person came in, to avoid the snow forecast for later. An ideal time to shop. I only shopped as we missed a few items off Saturday's click and collect Aldi order. 

 

I was just about to go out for a walk to pace out the length of some local flood defences. Now heavy snow has arrived and it's beginning to settle, wonderful. Just changing shoes and jacket into something more suitable. Unlike many years ago, we don't see heavy snow that much here. Yesterday while out for a walk it tried to snow, but all that came down was a combination of snow and hail, small hard round snow pellets. Now out into the snow.

Snow envy - I'm all packed up and ready to go out but still waiting😉 be careful out there

 

Carol

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9 minutes ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

Snow envy - I'm all packed up and ready to go out but still waiting😉 be careful out there

 

Carol

We’ve got a good few inches of snow here in Oxford and plenty more to come by the looks of it. Might get the sledge out of the loft!! 

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