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1 minute ago, The Blinking Eye said:

I want to SEE these multiple sale images! (Congrats) But now I understand why you are not sharing them.

A lot of it is pure luck, mine was anyway.

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21 minutes ago, The Blinking Eye said:

I want to SEE these multiple sale images! (Congrats) But now I understand why you are not sharing them.

 

Yep.

I will share 2 though:

My highest grossing, which was with 1 sale:

Doel nuclear power plant station in  Belgium. Across River Scheldt estuary. Antwerp in the distance. Dramatic sky - Stock Image

(At a much better rate, because it was long ago.)

 

And one of the runners up, which has been licensed 53 times for a total of 3797 gross, but which has since dried up.

Buenos Aires tango dancers. Couple dancing the tango on stage in La Esquina de Carlos Gardel theater dinner spectacle - Stock Image

(Also at better rates through the years.)

 

Now try to find out who licensed them and see if you can shoot for that market/client. If it still exists at all.

 

wim

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48 minutes ago, Avpics said:

Indeed. I'm just popping out to Mont Pourri.....

 

I wouldn't bust a gut - total fees amount to £281.78 net, though that doesn't include the September sale which hasn't cleared yet which was a little above average though not by much.

 

I spent two long summers based there in my misspent* youth, climbing the mountains (until the money ran out), and have often thought of going back to see how much it has changed but I'm held back by the thought it might have changed for the worse.   Besides, there's always new horizons....

 

* though I don't regret a minute of it!

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1 hour ago, The Blinking Eye said:

I want to SEE these multiple sale images! (Congrats) But now I understand why you are not sharing them.

 

I'm guessing that UK contributors have the most problems when it comes to copycatting as there are so many of them in a relatively compact area. Trekking to the Yukon to duplicate a shot is far more challenging than just popping over to the next county or village. 😎

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1 hour ago, Colblimp said:

How do I find this out without the bridge thing? 🤪

 

Edit:  Just counted - 78.

Andy go to your dashboard, download sales report, select "Date of Invoice" on the drop down (I think date paid is first option) Go back as far as you want on the select dates as far back as you want, select "GO" instead of download. That will give you all the licences, just scroll through them. Well that's what I did.

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7 minutes ago, aphperspective said:

Andy go to your dashboard, download sales report, select "Date of Invoice" on the drop down (I think date paid is first option) Go back as far as you want on the select dates as far back as you want, select "GO" instead of download. That will give you all the licences, just scroll through them. Well that's what I did.

Import the data into a spreadsheet of your choice (I use Excel) and set up Pivot tables to analyse the raw data.  Lots of web guidance on how to set them up but it will easily allow you to extract data such as number of sales for every sold image and total earnings per image. 

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10 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

Yep.

I will share 2 though:

My highest grossing, which was with 1 sale:

Doel nuclear power plant station in  Belgium. Across River Scheldt estuary. Antwerp in the distance. Dramatic sky - Stock Image

(At a much better rate, because it was long ago.)

 

And one of the runners up, which has been licensed 53 times for a total of 3797 gross, but which has since dried up.

Buenos Aires tango dancers. Couple dancing the tango on stage in La Esquina de Carlos Gardel theater dinner spectacle - Stock Image

(Also at better rates through the years.)

 

Now try to find out who licensed them and see if you can shoot for that market/client. If it still exists at all.

 

wim

 

WOW. I think the main lesson is it pays to take mindboggling amazing photos, whatever the topic. These are works of art.  Have you ever had an exhibit of your work?

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9 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I'm guessing that UK contributors have the most problems when it comes to copycatting as there are so many of them in a relatively compact area. Trekking to the Yukon to duplicate a shot is far more challenging than just popping over to the next county or village. 😎

 

Makes sense.

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My best seller has still hardly been copycatted after 8 years and it would be so easy to do. The occasional similar ones occasionally dribble in but I still have half the images for that search term. It's about 10% of my total revenue. And mine are slightly better IM(H)O.

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9 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

WOW. I think the main lesson is it pays to take mindboggling amazing photos, whatever the topic. These are works of art.  Have you ever had an exhibit of your work?

 

Thank you.

 

And yep, until it became too expensive. And when a museum director and curator told me: You're not a real artist are you?

I decided you know what, you are right, I get just the same satisfaction out of taking commercial images. So that was that.

I figured out I am in it for the problem solving mainly.

 

Here's a brilliant video of someone facing something of the same dilemma on a live broadcast recently: Adam Savage (of MythBuster fame)

 

wim

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I quite like that handy Adam Savage bloke. The question really reminds me of all those times I struggled when meeting picture researchers in gatherings. Always they would ask"what do you specialise in?" usually I would be  rescued by some clever wag who would chime in "He specialises in lost transparencies!" I wouldn't dare say I do general photography so would go for Megalithic Archaeology as an response but of course that was a very incomplete answer  and I would have starved if that had been factual. In fact, stock photography is a very handy way of wearing several hats according to circumstances. And if you do it badly, nobody is going to give you grief, it will just sink out of sight

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8 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

WOW. I think the main lesson is it pays to take mindboggling amazing photos, whatever the topic. These are works of art.  Have you ever had an exhibit of your work?

 

It's interesting to see the other examples of the same thing below that photograph.   Very much proves your point, I think, and goes against the "art" professor or whoever who told you stock photography would spoil your eye. 

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, spacecadet said:

My best seller has still hardly been copycatted after 8 years and it would be so easy to do. The occasional similar ones occasionally dribble in but I still have half the images for that search term. It's about 10% of my total revenue. And mine are slightly better IM(H)O.

But slightly better is all it takes. I often remember my mate Mark Burns who worked as picture editor at Stony Stone who said "Second best hardly ever sells" It's not 100% the case, but it'll do as a working principle.

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I have a healthy handful of repeats. Strangely enough, the best-selling of those is an activity I saw, ran for my camera and captured. Totally unplanned. I think the spontaneity of those might be recognized by buyers. I have more spontaneous images that are repeats also.

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I've had 13 sales and 15 sales from individual images with Alamy. Both bland subjects.

 

Another library, different pictures, I have a twelve, which has netted me £1779.79 so far.

 

Some impressive numbers in this topic.

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I have best selling collection from years ago a dozen images of the same subject (taken on a 6mp Canon). They have sold regularly for over a decade making in excess of $20k. Ive tried re-shooting the photos every way and variation I can think of, but its only the originals images that sell. I think they must have reached escape velocity!.

 

I had a image of a castle in Serbia that sold every month for around $20 it lasted about for years and hasn't sold since!

 

My best selling image went for $2865 just before lockdown.

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10 hours ago, MizBrown said:

 

It's interesting to see the other examples of the same thing below that photograph.   Very much proves your point, I think, and goes against the "art" professor or whoever who told you stock photography would spoil your eye. 

 

 

 

 

 

Did somebody tell me that? Or was it a question that appeared in my own mind? 🙂 It takes a lot more work (for me) to take mindboggling amazing photos though. A lot more. And I'm not sure Alamy feels like an appropriate outlet if I were to go to such lengths.

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1 minute ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Did somebody tell me that? Or was it a question that appeared in my own mind? 🙂 It takes a lot more work (for me) to take mindboggling amazing photos though. A lot more. And I'm not sure Alamy feels like an appropriate outlet if I were to go to such lengths.

  

It takes everyone a lot more work to take mindboggling amazing photos.  Patience, people handling, getting the right lighting, natural or otherwise, framing, talking people into being interesting in front of you and your lens, or capture a rare moment when they're unconsciously being mind-boggling amazing themselves.

 

I think it's good for people to try to take mind-boggling amazing photos. 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

  

It takes everyone a lot more work to take mindboggling amazing photos.  Patience, people handling, getting the right lighting, natural or otherwise, framing, talking people into being interesting in front of you and your lens, or capture a rare moment when they're unconsciously being mind-boggling amazing themselves.

 

I think it's good for people to try to take mind-boggling amazing photos. 

 

 

 

It also takes a lot more thought. And practice. I'm grateful for the people who do it so I can enjoy their photos.

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14 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

Thank you.

 

And yep, until it became too expensive. And when a museum director and curator told me: You're not a real artist are you?

I decided you know what, you are right, I get just the same satisfaction out of taking commercial images. So that was that.

I figured out I am in it for the problem solving mainly.

 

Here's a brilliant video of someone facing something of the same dilemma on a live broadcast recently: Adam Savage (of MythBuster fame)

 

wim

 

I rotate between artistic media - music, film, photography, dance, poetry and others, on and on, my whole life. I finally decided that's my inherent nature and I had to stop resisting it because being a generalist doesn't build the resume very well or lead to many accolades. Now it sort of fascinates me where my energy gets pulled. Lately, I've been into making handmade collaged postcards. It's fine to not fit into someone else's mold and to escape definition.

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On 16/12/2020 at 23:47, Mr Standfast said:
This statue has paid the car park fee in various forms a few times, I don't mind sharing him now, after he tripped and fell in the water.

These statues also have a tendency to trip and fall in Denmark.

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