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16 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

Pays to gan canny Mark 

 

 

Do folks 'gan canny' when they 'gan on the hoy?' Me oh my. I was hoping not to have to learn another language. I can say hello and thank you in 47 tongues but little else in most of them. 

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1 minute ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Do folks 'gan canny' when they 'gan on the hoy?' Me oh my. I was hoping not to have to learn another language. I can say hello and thank you in 47 tongues but little else in most of them. 

 

Thank you is the most important phrase in any language.

 

Allan

 

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15 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Do folks 'gan canny' when they 'gan on the hoy?' Me oh my. I was hoping not to have to learn another language. I can say hello and thank you in 47 tongues but little else in most of them. 

 

In my view it's a shame that these regional dialects are fading away Edo. 

 

It's a matter of personal taste, but two of my favourites are Lancastrian and Northumbrian. They are both soft and friendly, easy on the ear, if occasionally hard on the brain. We lived for a while in Wigan and grew to appreciate the local patois. Happily our younger son's partner is from that part of the world and speaks a diluted form of the lingo. I guess that our grandson will pick up some of it. 

 

My wife's uncle came from deepest Northumberland and I recall he had two ways of saying water, dependent upon temperature. It would be het wettor or cauld wattor!

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I hear you, Bryan. 

 

Back in the '80s my mate was from Northumbria. She normally spoke with a soft Oxbridge accent, but I heard the local dialect when she talked to her uncle just north of Newcastle. She was awarded the Queen's highest sword tap for work she did. She was a great person.  

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I remember in Sunderland I would say "Pass the bu'a please."  Dad would say "It is butter."  I repeated "Butter."  Dad said "That's Be'a."

 

Allan

 

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I think I may have to avoid Washington Square Park altogether these days... not to mention many streets on the way from the Village to Soho. Really bad day today. I went down there 10:30 am and came back 2:30 pm. Sightings included... one guy barely on his feet high on something. At least his eyes were closed and he wasn't on the move. Then a beggar came into a deli while I was buying a banana. I saw two more beggars and two definitely crazy guys.. one was shadowboxing with a lamppost. The east side of the park is pretty OK but now the west side --- even along the edge and the corner with the chessboard tables is full of sketchy characters. Sad. I know I am not "politically correct" calling these guys beggars but I'm feeling out of sorts about what is happening to my city.

 

Paulette

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8 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Back in the '80s my mate was from Northumbria. She normally spoke with a soft Oxbridge accent, but I heard the local dialect when she talked to her uncle just north of Newcastle. She was awarded the Queen's highest sword tap for work she did. She was a great person.  

 

Are you not going to reveal who this mysterious person is Edo ?

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13 hours ago, geogphotos said:

May I introduce you all to the local Suffolk accent near to me as shown by Brian from Melton.

 

https://nicholaspandolfi.co.uk/radio-brian-from-melton/

 

🙂 Dialect but easily understood.

 

I have encountered people in the UK who are completely incomprehensible to my ears.  I was once cycling in Scotland and asked directions of a man. He helpfully obliged.  Fortunately he also pointed the way to go, as I had no idea at all what he had said. 

 

Allan - Re Sunderland - I was cycling home from work one day when I came across a man holding a large bird - as you do. I asked him what type of bird it was and he said Arisarc  I nodded politely and cycled on, only later realising that he was saying Harris Hawk A bit like the French,  some folk around here don't sound  the H.

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48 minutes ago, Bryan said:

 

Are you not going to reveal who this mysterious person is Edo ?

 

Not without her permission, and we are not in contact. 

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UK clocks have gone back an hour as summertime ended. The only problem being that cats do not realise. After a busy day then a late night yesterday our cat Brán woke me up just after 5am. Sometimes I would welcome it, but not today.

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26 minutes ago, sb photos said:

UK clocks have gone back an hour as summertime ended. The only problem being that cats do not realise. After a busy day then a late night yesterday our cat Brán woke me up just after 5am. Sometimes I would welcome it, but not today.

 

A number of years ago I was housesitting for a woman with a very elderly cat. From memory he was an amazing age, something like 29 years I think. He also woke me at 5am with the loudest, most torturous sounding meow as he was deaf and had no idea how loud he was. He was loveable though and I remember it was a cold winter and we would both lounge in front of the heater to keep warm. If I did some yoga stretches he would too. He was a great character.

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4 minutes ago, Sally R said:

 

A number of years ago I was housesitting for a woman with a very elderly cat. From memory he was an amazing age, something like 29 years I think. He also woke me at 5am with the loudest, most torturous sounding meow as he was deaf and had no idea how loud he was. He was loveable though and I remember it was a cold winter and we would both lounge in front of the heater to keep warm. If I did some yoga stretches he would too. He was a great character.

 

My mother-in-law once house sat (?) for a lady with a cat. As bad luck would have it, one day she heard a very loud Meow and the cat dropped dead.

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1 minute ago, gvallee said:

My mother-in-law once house sat (?) for a lady with a cat. As bad luck would have it, one day she heard a very loud Meow and the cat dropped dead.

 

That sounds like a black comedy! My biggest fear was that the elderly cat I was looking after might die under my watch before his owner returned. On the second day he went off his food and I got quite worried. I told the owner over the phone about it and she said she had forgotten to tell me that that is normal for him and that he loses interest in food about every second day. Phew!

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2 minutes ago, Sally R said:

 

That sounds like a black comedy! My biggest fear was that the elderly cat I was looking after might die under my watch before his owner returned. On the second day he went off his food and I got quite worried. I told the owner over the phone about it and she said she had forgotten to tell me that that is normal for him and that he loses interest in food about every second day. Phew!

 

Ah that reminds me of another story. I was cat sitting for a friend. The cat used to be a stray cat that ventured into my friend's house and he adopted it. The cat became completely obsessed with him. Anyway, he left me with a provision of salmon cat food tins. On the first day, I opened one. The cat looked at it in disgust and walked away. On the third day, he still hadn't eaten. Upon his return, my friend told me 'I forgot to tell you, he's not fussy or anything [obviously not!! Come on, salmon!!] but he doesn't like one brand I bought for him.

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5 minutes ago, gvallee said:

Ah that reminds me of another story. I was cat sitting for a friend. The cat used to be a stray cat that ventured into my friend's house and he adopted it. The cat became completely obsessed with him. Anyway, he left me with a provision of salmon cat food tins. On the first day, I opened one. The cat looked at it in disgust and walked away. On the third day, he still hadn't eaten. Upon his return, my friend told me 'I forgot to tell you, he's not fussy or anything [obviously not!! Come on, salmon!!] but he doesn't like one brand I bought for him.

 

Cats are so funny with how particular they can be about food. In recent years I was intermittently looking after two Staffy dogs and it was the opposite situation - eating anything and everything and in about 10 seconds flat!

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As the clocks went back last night I had to stay in bed an extra hour this morning.

 

Allan

 

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17 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

As the clocks went back last night I had to stay in bed an extra hour this morning.

 

Allan

 

Shouldn't that be in the "good things" thread"? I'm over 59, you know.

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On 18/07/2020 at 15:17, geogphotos said:

Went to an auction viewing about 12 miles away to see a lot listed as consisting of an old slide projector ( not interested in it) and two big cardboard boxes of slides ( back to film project). 

 

Probably several thousand 'slides' but only the mounts. Just tray after tray, box after box of slide mounts of different sorts, some plastic, some card, without any actual sliver of film to be seen anywhere. Wasted journey. No idea what that was all about. 

 

 

 

Now thats an "outing" that is.  Or is that not one of the rules or is one of the rules or might be one of the  . . . . . . 

 

A disingenuous listing on the auction site re the slides but if you are lucky, as I'm sure you know anyway, there can be some real "social history" images (slides / pictures / transparencies?) - a colleague of mine came across about 30+ "Kodaks" showing a family's days out in America circa 1960+ ; fantastic images of the times. The cars, the clothes, the advertising - the Americana.   A joy just to look at them and wonder who they are (were) why their history turned up in the UK  etc etc. 

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On 22/10/2020 at 20:55, Bryan said:

 

🙂 Dialect but easily understood.

 

I have encountered people in the UK who are completely incomprehensible to my ears.  I was once cycling in Scotland and asked directions of a man. He helpfully obliged.  Fortunately he also pointed the way to go, as I had no idea at all what he had said. 

 

Allan - Re Sunderland - I was cycling home from work one day when I came across a man holding a large bird - as you do. I asked him what type of bird it was and he said Arisarc  I nodded politely and cycled on, only later realising that he was saying Harris Hawk A bit like the French,  some folk around here don't sound  the H.

 

I've read (and dont quote me) that some of the "Northern" words, phrases, accents are whispered echos of the Norse (so called Vikings) who populated and integrated e.g. Yorkshire and Cumbria.  The latter the last outpost of the Norse while Harold's ('arold's?) Normans went about their harrying (ethnic cleansing) of the north.   Strange really as they were effectively cousins at least.  

Not all Scottish is incomprehensible - I know of what you speak :mellow: - thats possibly just Scots "speak".  The most lilting, haunting and evocative language to me is the Gaelic of the Western Isles of Scotland ! 

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1 hour ago, Magnus said:

 

I've read (and dont quote me) that some of the "Northern" words, phrases, accents are whispered echos of the Norse (so called Vikings) who populated and integrated e.g. Yorkshire and Cumbria.  The latter the last outpost of the Norse while Harold's ('arold's?) Normans went about their harrying (ethnic cleansing) of the north.   Strange really as they were effectively cousins at least.  

Not all Scottish is incomprehensible - I know of what you speak :mellow: - thats possibly just Scots "speak".  The most lilting, haunting and evocative language to me is the Gaelic of the Western Isles of Scotland ! 

 

Yes there are still traces of Norse, I'd always assumed that Hyem for home was derived from the Norse, but apparently it's from Old English.  "Am ganin hyem. " 

 

Certainly plenty of place names  derived from the Norse

 

Have to agree that hearing a song sung  in Gaelic can be magical, while posh Scottish is very easy on the ear. 🙂

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My grandfather,  from many generations in the rural parts of Virginia, used to call "turtles" "turkles."   Found out through some Googling that was also used in Lancaster, UK.   Don't know if it shows up in other dialects of UK English.

 

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7 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Shouldn't that be in the "good things" thread"? I'm over 59, you know.

 

No, bad thing. Woke at my usual time which this morning was 5.30am so had to wait till 6.30 to get out of bed. Total waste of time.☺️

 

Allan

 

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On 22/10/2020 at 20:55, Bryan said:

 

🙂 Dialect but easily understood.

 

I have encountered people in the UK who are completely incomprehensible to my ears.  I was once cycling in Scotland and asked directions of a man. He helpfully obliged.  Fortunately he also pointed the way to go, as I had no idea at all what he had said. 

 

Allan - Re Sunderland - I was cycling home from work one day when I came across a man holding a large bird - as you do. I asked him what type of bird it was and he said Arisarc  I nodded politely and cycled on, only later realising that he was saying Harris Hawk A bit like the French,  some folk around here don't sound  the H.

Re the accents in Scotland, I also have great difficulty understanding some Scots. I'm going a bit deaf in my old age and when I visit my daughter who lives near Lanark, I'm very often totally bemused by the accent. It can be embarrassing at times.

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