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6 hours ago, MDM said:

 

So that assumes that following the rules will keep you safe. I would think that is a very dangerous (literally dangerous that is) assumption given the unbelievable levels of incompetence we have experienced and continue to experience by those who make up and apply these rules.

 

In order to get on with my day I will try to keep this short. Testing capacity is currently at about 20% of what is needed so once again nobody has any realistic idea of the actual number of cases, locally or nationally. I find it truly incredible that those who supposedly manage all this did not foresee that there would be a greatly increased need for tests by now, firstly after society opened up again in most parts of the country over the summer and secondly as kids go back to school simply because of all the interactions. But testing capacity is greatly depleted again because nobody had the foresight to realise that the number of cases would start to increase again significantly. 

 

Open the schools at any cost - they are safe places is the message, but don't forget that a lot of kids are asymptomatic and infectious at the same time. Keep them in year group bubbles - that should work. Of course they won't meet up with their friends or family outside of those bubbles - or will they? Shut the pubs early - that might work. What insight they have into the drinking habits of the masses. How about a rule of 6 (did they throw a dice for that one)? Don't wear a mask, wear a mask. 

 

Trust the rules to keep you safe. Tell that to all those who died in care homes. But don't forget this is not just about death. This is a serious and potentially life-shattering illness for those of us who got through round 1. We await round 2.

 

OK I said short. It could be a long essay. Take care Allan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

we are having same problems in Ontario.   Testing is a mess, people lining up at 4:30am today in 1 degree weather to be told at 7:30, here is a time slot,  come back at 11am (when they will have to wait for 3-4 hours based on last few days).  

 

Kids not allowed back in class if they had sniffles until they get negative testing.   

 

We now have 2 Federal party leaders testing positive this week (while thankfully parliament was prorogued ), including the new Conservative leader of the opposition,  who said he was going to use Boris Johnson as model, I guess he is going literal on this.  

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9 hours ago, MDM said:


 

 


I recall talking about this before with you  but having lens replacement surgery was the closest thing to rebirth I have ever experienced. I had mine done 4 years ago and wish I had done it years before. Like you I was being told the cataracts were not ripe and I was waiting to get it done for free on the NHS here but due to ongoing government cutbacks they kept raising the bar every year for how bad they had to be so by the time I decide to pay for the surgery you had to be virtually blind in an eye test to get it done. By the sounds of it your eyes are probably worse than mine were. I guess most people go for years before getting surgery and then wish they had done it much sooner. 

 

As a photographer it becomes even more critical. For me it was like having old, yellow filters in front of my eyes. The experience of waking up the day after the first operation and seeing everything really sharp with beautifully clear colours, properly saturated and the yellow filter gone is one of the standout moments of my life. As I didn’t get the other eye done for a few weeks, I was able to compare and the difference was amazing. My only regret was waiting so long to get it done. 
 

Mine are mono focal  and I still wear reading glasses but I have perfect distance vision. The surgeon recommended the mono vocals as he said they are a lot less likely to have complications afterwards. The bit about age is also likely true. I was in my early 60s. 
 

So my advice is get them done now, yesterday, ASAP.  


One other thing. The deterioration is so gradual you don’t notice it happening so it becomes normal to have imperfect eyesight. The change when you take the eye shield off after the operation is truly  and literally  amazing. 
 

 

 

Thanks. I remember that conversation. At the time, my eye doctor was not suggesting that I get the cataracts done yet. From what I've been reading online, I've gotten the impression that the monofocal lenses are less problematic. That's good to know. BTW, do you now need glasses when doing work on the computer?

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1 hour ago, meanderingemu said:

we are having same problems in Ontario.   Testing is a mess, people lining up at 4:30am today in 1 degree weather to be told at 7:30, here is a time slot,  come back at 11am (when they will have to wait for 3-4 hours based on last few days).  

 

Kids not allowed back in class if they had sniffles until they get negative testing.   

 

We now have 2 Federal party leaders testing positive this week (while thankfully parliament was prorogued ), including the new Conservative leader of the opposition,  who said he was going to use Boris Johnson as model, I guess he is going literal on this.  

 

It's a disease and so is Covid-19. Say no more lest it becomes political 😎.

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40 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Thanks. I remember that conversation. At the time, my eye doctor was not suggesting that I get the cataracts done yet. From what I've been reading online, I've gotten the impression that the monofocal lenses are less problematic. That's good to know. BTW, do you now need glasses when doing work on the computer?

 

Yes but only for computer and reading. Four years on and I still have perfect distance eyesight. It is no exaggeration to say what a huge effect it had on my life and especially on my photography. I was having the same problem not seeing things really clearly on screen in terms of sharpness. And the colours - really incredible change. If you can get this done free go for it.

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1 minute ago, MDM said:

 

Yes but only for computer and reading. Four years on and I still have perfect distance eyesight. It is no exaggeration to say what a huge effect it had on my life and especially on my photography. I was having the same problem not seeing things really clearly on screen in terms of sharpness. And the colours - really incredible change. If you can get this done free go for it.

 

Thanks again. I've been very lucky with my eyesight. I didn't need reading glasses until I was in my early 50's, and my distance vision held up until I was 65. It has been a gradual decline since then. I was hoping that I wouldn't need glasses for computer work after the cataract surgery. Oh well, it's a trade-off, I suppose...

 

Stay well.

 

Never Mind Homer GIF by MOODMAN

 

 

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On 18/09/2020 at 21:29, MDM said:

This is what you are looking for?

 

 

i was going to say the same as Bionic.  Already answered.

 

Allan

 

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58 minutes ago, MDM said:

 

So how about this  and/or this and/or this 

 

I have the Huawei Y6 2019 smartish phone which I had to get quickly in Lincoln when my Sony Experia Compact packed up just before travelling back to Cambridge. Also a Nokia Lumia 530 which was a backup phone purchased a few years ago and do not like it. Then I bought an original iPhone SE from a friend last year and wondering why.

 

Used to have an iPad but gave it to my daughter.

 

Also have an Epson XP-335 printer which I bought quickly after my previous printer packed up.

 

Allan

 

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On 19/09/2020 at 00:52, John Mitchell said:

Thanks very much for all the info, Betty. I obviously asked the right person. Are your IOL's the monofocal type? Those are the kind that I'd be getting as the Canadian healthcare system doesn't pay for the much more expensive multifocal ones. The lenses would be set for distance, which means I will still have to wear glasses for reading and perhaps computer work (not sure about this). I currently wear glasses with progressive lenses. As it is, I can see OK, with a few exceptions -- e.g TV subtitles. Driving at night can be a bit tricky sometimes as I start to see halos and "stars" around oncoming headlights. One of my eyes is worse than the other. Sounds like that's common. BTW, "not ripe" was the term my eye doctor used. I assumed he meant that my cataracts still have a way to go before I'm in big trouble.

 

P.S. I guess this discussion is sort of photography related. No eyes, no pics. Sorry if I'm boring anyone.

Mine are mono. I could have had the other, but chose not to. For instance, I’ve only ever worn reading glasses. The kind (half glasses) that I can look up over to see distance, but I only put them on for close work.  I tried the multi focal glasses. Didn’t like tilting my head to find the narrow strip that brought something into focus.

When my astigmatism got worse, I had a seldom used pair for driving with the astigmatism correction. They were distance only. 
I just carry on with reading glasses now, but no longer have to have a prescription for them. The astigmatism was corrected with the implants. Now I can go to the drugstore and buy off the shelf readers that save me a lot of dollars.
Don’t let anyone push you into the surgery. You will know when it’s time, when you are no longer happy with your vision. I must say, though, once you do it you’ll find the difference in how the world looks to you quite remarkable.
 

About the “ripe” word. I guess my opinion came from listening to the Ophthalmologist I worked for. If a patient used that word, the doctor quickly said “no such thing”.  Probably so people wouldn’t think of cataracts like a ripe tomato with the next stage going to rot!

 

When I observed cataract surgery, the procedure involved a small hand tool that broke up the cloudy material and sucked it out. That’s why I said waiting until that material becomes harder makes the procedure a bit harder. The material would need a bit of extra time to get the pieces broken down small enough for suction.

I've been out of the profession for years. Considering the amazing advancements always going on in medicine, the tools most assuredly have changed. Perhaps there is no difference in older, stiffer cataract removal these days. Plus no matter what, even back then it wasn’t at all any big problem to wait for surgery anyway. Possibly an extra minute or two difference during the procedure.

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17 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Mine are mono. I could have had the other, but chose not to. For instance, I’ve only ever worn reading glasses. The kind (half glasses) that I can look up over to see distance, but I only put them on for close work.  I tried the multi focal glasses. Didn’t like tilting my head to find the narrow strip that brought something into focus.

When my astigmatism got worse, I had a seldom used pair for driving with the astigmatism correction. They were distance only. 
I just carry on with reading glasses now, but no longer have to have a prescription for them. The astigmatism was corrected with the implants. Now I can go to the drugstore and buy off the shelf readers that save me a lot of dollars.
Don’t let anyone push you into the surgery. You will know when it’s time, when you are no longer happy with your vision. I must say, though, once you do it you’ll find the difference in how the world looks to you quite remarkable.
 

About the “ripe” word. I guess my opinion came from listening to the Ophthalmologist I worked for. If a patient used that word, the doctor quickly said “no such thing”.  Probably so people wouldn’t think of cataracts like a ripe tomato with the next stage going to rot!

 

When I observed cataract surgery, the procedure involved a small hand tool that broke up the cloudy material and sucked it out. That’s why I said waiting until that material becomes harder makes the procedure a bit harder. The material would need a bit of extra time to get the pieces broken down small enough for suction.

I've been out of the profession for years. Considering the amazing advancements always going on in medicine, the tools most assuredly have changed. Perhaps there is no difference in older, stiffer cataract removal these days. Plus no matter what, even back then it wasn’t at all any big problem to wait for surgery anyway. Possibly an extra minute or two difference during the procedure.

 

I'd only ever worn reading glasses as well -- the inexpensive magnifiers that you buy at the drugstore. It took me quite a long time to get used to tipping my head back and forth like a woodpecker with my current multi-focal "specs", but I'm used to it now. One thing I do like about the progressive lenses is that I don't have to keep taking my glasses on and off all the time, except when using my camera's viewfinder of course. Anyway, I'm going to book another appointment with my eye doc so that I can ask him a few more questions. Shall probably have the surgery done early next year, depending how the COVID disaster goes. Thanks very much for all the info. I feel much better now. 🌞

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I’m sure glad improvements have advanced treatment since the time my father had his cataracts removed in the mid-1970s. Though he was younger than fifty, he had developed terrible cataracts from being a radarman in the US Navy during WWII. For the removal, he had to be hospitalized for a couple of days and kept immobile for the first 24 hours after the surgery. Afterwards, his vision was forever horrible, and he had to wear hard contact lenses that were constantly getting dislodged, along with different types of glasses, depending on what he was doing. It was all quite frustrating. These days, it seems such a comparatively simple procedure. Still, I plan to avoid surgery until mine start to become problematic. Hopefully, that’s a few years away. I’ve worn two different contacts for years: one in my non-dominent eye for reading and the other for distance. I rarely ever wear my glasses and my optometrist tells me having the same type of lenses implanted after cataract removal should work well for me. That would be nice since glasses drive me nuts.

 

John, would a second opinion from another doctor be an option?
 

 

 

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On 20/09/2020 at 12:36, Cecile Marion said:

I’m sure glad improvements have advanced treatment since the time my father had his cataracts removed in the mid-1970s. Though he was younger than fifty, he had developed terrible cataracts from being a radarman in the US Navy during WWII. For the removal, he had to be hospitalized for a couple of days and kept immobile for the first 24 hours after the surgery. Afterwards, his vision was forever horrible, and he had to wear hard contact lenses that were constantly getting dislodged, along with different types of glasses, depending on what he was doing. It was all quite frustrating. These days, it seems such a comparatively simple procedure. Still, I plan to avoid surgery until mine start to become problematic. Hopefully, that’s a few years away. I’ve worn two different contacts for years: one in my non-dominent eye for reading and the other for distance. I rarely ever wear my glasses and my optometrist tells me having the same type of lenses implanted after cataract removal should work well for me. That would be nice since glasses drive me nuts.

 

John, would a second opinion from another doctor be an option?
 

 

 

If you’ve had one eye at different focus than the other, yes, you should adapt to implants done that way as well. When I first needed readers, I tried a contact for near. I really didn’t get on with it. Part of that, for me, is when one eye focuses near and the other far, it messes with your depth of field because both eyes never focus together.  
Apparently you got used to it easily, I didn’t. My oldest sister had her implants split like that. She’s complained about her vision and avoids reading ever since. I think she didn’t adapt, like me.  Her doctor (Not my doctor) should have done the contact thing with her first to see if she could adapt to it.  He talked her into doing it that way.

Back when your dad had his done, there were no implants probably, but they were on the horizon soon after. The whole lens was taken out and the only way to see was contacts or coke bottle thick lenses. If one had astigmatism, which is caused by the cornea having a different degree of slope than the other plane, shaped a bit like the back of a spoon, the only way to correct astigmatism was through hard contacts or glasses. Astigmatism couldn’t be corrected with soft ones.
The way it’s done now is the cloudy insides are taken out, and the front “skin” of the capsule. The back “skin” is left for retinal stability.  Since the back of the lens is left in, sometimes, after surgery, it gets cloudy a few years later. Sometimes called a secondary cataract. Extremely easily fixed by burning a hole through it with a laser. No pain, no trouble, not much more trouble than an ordinary eye exam when your eyes are dilated. My other sister had it done on one eye.

John, if any of the information I’ve imparted helps you firm up questions, that's good.

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On 20/09/2020 at 10:36, Cecile Marion said:

I’m sure glad improvements have advanced treatment since the time my father had his cataracts removed in the mid-1970s. Though he was younger than fifty, he had developed terrible cataracts from being a radarman in the US Navy during WWII. For the removal, he had to be hospitalized for a couple of days and kept immobile for the first 24 hours after the surgery. Afterwards, his vision was forever horrible, and he had to wear hard contact lenses that were constantly getting dislodged, along with different types of glasses, depending on what he was doing. It was all quite frustrating. These days, it seems such a comparatively simple procedure. Still, I plan to avoid surgery until mine start to become problematic. Hopefully, that’s a few years away. I’ve worn two different contacts for years: one in my non-dominent eye for reading and the other for distance. I rarely ever wear my glasses and my optometrist tells me having the same type of lenses implanted after cataract removal should work well for me. That would be nice since glasses drive me nuts.

 

John, would a second opinion from another doctor be an option?
 

 

 

 

That's quite a story about your father, Cecile. I certainly wouldn't want to go through an ordeal like that. However, as Betty suggests, the operation is a piece of cake nowadays, taking only 15 minutes according to my eye surgeon, so I'm not especially worried about it. I will ask him about implanting two different strength lenses, though. Thanks for the suggestion. My guess is that I could easily wait longer, but it sounds as if there are advantages to getting cataracts done earlier. I know someone who decided to have them done in her 50's, which is now verging on ancient history for me.

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11 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

I will ask him about implanting two different strength lenses, though


I had a cataract in one eye and had a distance lens put in that one.  My other eye works for closer up.  I haven't worn glasses in decades now.  One lens for close work and one lens for distance seems to work well for some.  The doctor asked me what I wanted.

 

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3 hours ago, MizBrown said:


I had a cataract in one eye and had a distance lens put in that one.  My other eye works for closer up.  I haven't worn glasses in decades now.  One lens for close work and one lens for distance seems to work well for some.  The doctor asked me what I wanted.

 

 

I'd end up having to wear a monocle if I did that. 🧐

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Devastating thing for me. I brought in a monarch caterpillar when it was about twice as long as a grain of rice. I quickly bought a butterfly cage with extras. Fed the little guy milkweed which I planted this spring. Nurtured it, loved it...I know, I invested too much of myself.

It made a chrysalis about 10 days after bringing it in, attached to the top of the cage. Two more weeks waiting.

The butterfly emerged two days ago but didn’t thrive. Never could fly. Then died.

I spent yesterday crying off and on, then buried it this morning. I had this little creature for a month and spent much time watching it munch on milkweed I brought in. I’m so sad.
I’m sure you think I’m pretty lame to cry over a butterfly. That's just who I am.

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9 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Devastating thing for me. I brought in a monarch caterpillar when it was about twice as long as a grain of rice. I quickly bought a butterfly cage with extras. Fed the little guy milkweed which I planted this spring. Nurtured it, loved it...I know, I invested too much of myself.

It made a chrysalis about 10 days after bringing it in, attached to the top of the cage. Two more weeks waiting.

The butterfly emerged two days ago but didn’t thrive. Never could fly. Then died.

I spent yesterday crying off and on, then buried it this morning. I had this little creature for a month and spent much time watching it munch on milkweed I brought in. I’m so sad.
I’m sure you think I’m pretty lame to cry over a butterfly. That's just who I am.

 

Not lame it is natural.

For anyone who has an affinity with animals, insects and other living things who have spent some time caring for them usually have a feeling of sadness, and, yes a tear or two when they pass away.

 

Allan

 

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5 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Not lame it is natural.

For anyone who has an affinity with animals, insects and other living things who have spent some time caring for them usually have a feeling of sadness, and, yes a tear or two when they pass away.

 

Allan

 

Thanks for your empathy, Allan.

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On 18/09/2020 at 17:03, Allan Bell said:

 

I really ought to start my own blog for this.

 

Went into Lincoln this morning on the bus to look for a new street map of Lincoln as my existing map is way our of date and there have been a lot of major road works since. I also wanted a "Pathfinder map" for the area showing all the public rights of way, footpaths, and bridleways etc. Went to WHS and they did not have either. Then I tried Waterstones and they did not have them either but an attendant told me that they were waiting for Ordnance Survey to start producing the Lincoln street map again. He also told me that OS did not produce the "Pathfinder" maps any more either. WASTE OF TIME.

 

Back to bus station to catch the bus home again. Now I should have had my glasses (specs) on - but I didn't. Caught the bus that was at the stand where the number 3 waits. We set off and after a little while I noted the bus was going a different way. I ended up at Lincoln hospital. Had a word with the driver when he stopped at a stop in the hospital grounds pointing in the opposite direction to which I needed to go and told him I think I have caught the wrong bus. "Where do you want to go?" he said. "To Cherry Willingham" I replied. "You want the number 3 bus" he said. "I know that and thought I was on the number 3" I said. "This is the X6 for the hospital only" he said. "Stay on the bus and I'll try to get back to the bus station so you will be in time to catch the the next number 3" he said. As we approached the bus station the driver said "The number 3 is just leaving, sorry". "Thank you for trying" I said.

 

Went into the bus station and looked at the notices with my specs on this time and noted that both the numbers 3 and X6 were now sharing the same stand. So I went on a circular trip and WASTED 20 minutes on the X6 for nothing. The next bus for C W would not depart for another 20 mins and time was getting tight for my next appointment at the surgery.

Went into The Grand Coffee House, attached to the bus station, and had a coffee and tried to calm down. Well I could not do anything else and I wasn't paying for a taxi. Caught the next bus for C W which arrived at the stand a bit late. Horror of horrors the driver left the bus and walked off. Oh! MG they are changing drivers. After another 10 minute wait I was starting to hop from one foot to the other.

Finally the new driver arrived and we soon set off about 20 minutes late. The driver seemed he wanted to make up time and sped along when he could but still seemed as though he had to stop at every bus stop on the route.

 

When we arrived in C W I managed to get off at the stop before the one I wanted. ARRRRGH! Another extra 5 minute walk on top of the time it usually takes me to get to my bungalow from the correct stop.

 

After all that the only good thing to come out of it was I still managed to get to the surgery on time for my appointment.

 

Sorry I just had to get the above off my chest. Enjoy and have a laugh on me.

 

Allan

 

 

Allan, Only just caught up on the thread.

 

The OS don't make Pathfinder maps any more, but they have changed the name to Explorer and the maps are the same (1:25,000 or 2 and half inches to the mile)

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Explorer-Map-Lincoln-Paper-Active/dp/0319244695

 

Hope this helps.

 

John.

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44 minutes ago, Stokie said:

 

Allan, Only just caught up on the thread.

 

The OS don't make Pathfinder maps any more, but they have changed the name to Explorer and the maps are the same (1:25,000 or 2 and half inches to the mile)

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Explorer-Map-Lincoln-Paper-Active/dp/0319244695

 

Hope this helps.

 

John.

 

Thank you John For the information. We did sort it, eventually.

 

Allan

 

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Defective Modern Things

 

So it came to pass that my only remaining usable auto focus lense has become defective. (The previous failure was the standard Sony zoom as fitted to the Nex 6). This one, a Sigma 19mm f2.8, has developed a rattle and a percentage of images are very soft down one side, so maybe an element is loose? Whatever, today I set off to cycle through to the local trusty repairer in Newcastle.

 

Not so fast said my bike, as the gear cable promptly snapped. Now this bike was a present to myself on the occasion of my 65th birthday, and has done very few miles, but this is the second gear cable to snap. The system is a slick and convenient Shimano Tiagra, but reliability is certainly not its forte.  This contrasts with my 9 year old Brompton bike that is used every day and has never required a new cable, or looking back, my first tourer which did many thousands of miles and I don't recall ever fitting a new gear cable to that.

 

This reminds me of the occasion waiting on Durham station one Xmas to pick up our son, when it was announced that the power lines were down north of Newcastle and trains were badly delayed. Shortly after a 1930s steam loco came rumbling through, quite undeterred.

 

They just don't make kit like they used to, or maybe we have sacrificed reliability in the search for convenience?

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7 minutes ago, Bryan said:

They just don't make kit like they used to, or maybe we have sacrificed reliability in the search for convenience?

 

Sorry about your bad day with unreliable things Bryan.  I think we have swapped reliability with affordability.  I just had a locking clasp on a tripod leg snap off in my hand, obviously made with cheap plastic.  I called the manufacturer and they are sending a replacement part but now I have no faith in this specialty tripod. 

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On 29/09/2020 at 12:17, Bryan said:

 

They just don't make kit like they used to, or maybe we have sacrificed reliability in the search for convenience?

 

I think they design things nowadays to fail more easily after a period of time.

That way people keep buying stuff more often !

 

Apple and Samsung fined for deliberately slowing down their mobile phones' performance..

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/oct/24/apple-samsung-fined-for-slowing-down-phones

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On 29/09/2020 at 06:17, Bryan said:

Defective Modern Things

 

So it came to pass that my only remaining usable auto focus lense has become defective. (The previous failure was the standard Sony zoom as fitted to the Nex 6). This one, a Sigma 19mm f2.8, has developed a rattle and a percentage of images are very soft down one side, so maybe an element is loose? Whatever, today I set off to cycle through to the local trusty repairer in Newcastle.

 

Not so fast said my bike, as the gear cable promptly snapped. Now this bike was a present to myself on the occasion of my 65th birthday, and has done very few miles, but this is the second gear cable to snap. The system is a slick and convenient Shimano Tiagra, but reliability is certainly not its forte.  This contrasts with my 9 year old Brompton bike that is used every day and has never required a new cable, or looking back, my first tourer which did many thousands of miles and I don't recall ever fitting a new gear cable to that.

 

This reminds me of the occasion waiting on Durham station one Xmas to pick up our son, when it was announced that the power lines were down north of Newcastle and trains were badly delayed. Shortly after a 1930s steam loco came rumbling through, quite undeterred.

 

They just don't make kit like they used to, or maybe we have sacrificed reliability in the search for convenience?

Boy, do I ever get that. My mom & stepdad bought a refrigerator when I was 7 years old. She used it for 14 years, bought a bigger one, and gave the old to my husband & I during the time we were practically paupers. We used it for about 10 years more. Then we bought a new one for the frost-free feature, not because the old one quit working. It had never had to be repaired, but defrosting it wasn’t fun.

 

The modern ones might last 10 years if you’re lucky. I’ve had my present one about 4 years and it was repaired a year ago. I do realize that some of the modern appliances have many more features to break down.

A repairman for something I was getting repaired once verified that modern things are made to last about 8-10 years. Built-in obsolescence. 
I've had a cookstove, television, a couple of refrigerators, a vacuum, garbage disposal, furnaces, air conditioners, (on and on) go out on me. None of them were very old. Some almost new.
As far as photography things go, the only thing that failed on me was a tripod head and the venerated Nikon 24-70 lens that I paid Big Bucks for. It became stuck at one focal distance. Turned out to be a common flaw. A shame, it took cracking photos. It was out of warranty so I sold it to someone who took it apart and fixed it. My hair turned white just thinking about having the guts to do that.

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