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Images sold in July 2020


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2 minutes ago, Bella said:

 

Wow Andy!! 26... congrats! Has that happened before?

 

Sheralee

Thanks Sheralee!  Last month I had 44 sales, 42 of which dropped in near the end of the month.

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women-blowing-her-hair-and-old-english-s

 

Country: United Kingdom

Usage: Editorial
Media: Newspaper - national
Print run: up to 2 million
Placement: Inside and online
Image Size: 1/4 page
Start: 18 June 2020
End: 19 June 2020
Any placement in paper and online. One use in a single editorial article used within the print and digital versions of a single publication. Digital usage includes archive rights for the lifetime of the article.

 

Usual $

Edited by Abiyoyo
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Low $$ 

Country: Worldwide ; Usage: Presentation or newsletter ;  Start: 28-July-2020 ; Duration: In perpetuity ;Additional Details: Use in a single presentation (e.g. Powerpoint or Keynote) or in a newsletter.

 

chrome-globe-on-a-multi-coloured-rainbow-hut-on-southend-pier-southend-on-sea-essex-uk-mirror-ball-reflecting-thames-estuary-campus-accomodation-WHJCTF.jpg

 

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9 hours ago, Colblimp said:

Thanks Sheralee!  Last month I had 44 sales, 42 of which dropped in near the end of the month.

 

That's fantastic Andy! You're obviously in a good position there to get some good editorial content. It's a little more difficult in country Australia. If I had just kept uploading when I first started I might be doing better by now.

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1 minute ago, Bella said:

 

That's fantastic Andy! You're obviously in a good position there to get some good editorial content. It's a little more difficult in country Australia. If I had just kept uploading when I first started I might be doing better by now.

I live in what is, essentially, the middle of nowhere.  I do a lot of travelling and press is 95% of what I do.  I'm guessing it's very difficult in Oz, unless you live in one of the big cities where news stories happen more often than in the sticks?

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5 hours ago, Colblimp said:

I live in what is, essentially, the middle of nowhere.  I do a lot of travelling and press is 95% of what I do.  I'm guessing it's very difficult in Oz, unless you live in one of the big cities where news stories happen more often than in the sticks?

 

Definitely more opportunities in the cities... yep I'm in the sticks 😂

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Book - Australia - $$$+

I'm very pleased about this license. On top of a very good price, I loved the location. Ball's Pyramid off Lord Howe Island.

Until the last minute, we were not sure whether we would be able to sail there due to bumpy seas. It was all good in the end, albeit a bit rough for a few hours. The pyramid sight was very impressive. Hard to believe but on this tiny outcrop, a giant stick insect believed extinct was rediscovered in 2001.

 

HACM4W.jpg

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Anneliese Dodds MP, photographed at Kidlington in 2017, now Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer. A regular seller, but wish it was for more.

 

Country: Worldwide Usage: Editorial Media: Editorial website mid $

 

Kidlington, Oxford, UK. 25th November 2017. Campsfield House Immigration Removal Centre 24th Anniversary Demonstration. Stock Photo

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3 hours ago, gvallee said:

Book - Australia - $$$+

I'm very pleased about this license. On top of a very good price, I loved the location. Ball's Pyramid off Lord Howe Island.

Until the last minute, we were not sure whether we would be able to sail there due to bumpy seas. It was all good in the end, albeit a bit rough for a few hours. The pyramid sight was very impressive. Hard to believe but on this tiny outcrop, a giant stick insect believed extinct was rediscovered in 2001.

 

 

I hear about that giant stick insects in a TV documentary about Australia. For me it is something unbelievable that those animals could live and survive there for…millennia?
Your image gives a new and more amazing perspective of the story.
Great picture and congrats for the sale! 👏

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4 minutes ago, shearwater said:

 

I hear about that giant stick insects in a TV documentary about Australia. For me it is something unbelievable that those animals could live and survive there for…millennia?
Your image gives a new and more amazing perspective of the story.
Great picture and congrats for the sale! 👏

 

Thank you. It's hard to imagine what they feed on on this rocky outcrop. Also it makes you wonder, what is it that gives man/woman a compulsion to climb anything remotely hilly? They would not have been re-discovered otherwise.

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23 minutes ago, NYCat said:

Editorial print and digital... $$

 

EH0X9D.jpg

Yacare Caiman in the Pantanal, Brazil

 

Paulette

 

You're doing well with your Pantanal pictures Paulette. Good on you. Well deserved. 

If I remember you went during the wet season. I see that you still managed to get sunny days. Good light.

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4 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

Thank you. It's hard to imagine what they feed on on this rocky outcrop. Also it makes you wonder, what is it that gives man/woman a compulsion to climb anything remotely hilly? They would not have been re-discovered otherwise.

 

It remains me of the Roque Chico de Salmor giant lizard (Gallotia simonyi simonyi), an subspecie extincted in the 30s, which only lived in a veeery small islet (40m high and 0,004km2) near to El Hierro Island, in Canary Islands (Spain).

In the 70s a relic population of another subspecie of the same giant lizard was re-discovered in El Hierro cliffs, and reintroduced in the Salmor islet…where they are thriving again :)

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3 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

You're doing well with your Pantanal pictures Paulette. Good on you. Well deserved. 

If I remember you went during the wet season. I see that you still managed to get sunny days. Good light.

 

We were there the end of August-- beginning of September so it was dry season but, even so, we had a helluva trip in our bus along the Transpantaneira after a rainstorm. That mud is beyond slippery and we kept slithering sideways. For a while the owner of the lodge was following and helping us but he finally had to go back. I don't know if you ever traveled that way but there is bridge after bridge after bridge and you have to speed up getting to them to go up onto the wood. At one point there was a big drop-off and Joe VanOs had us get out of the bus. He said to bring our passports. The poor bus driver couldn't get off and, thank heavens, he made it and we got back on. A two hour trip took us nine hours. Most of the time there was no cell signal but we finally were able to reach a lodge along the way and they prepared us some lunch. I know this is mild compared to some of your trips. I went with photosafaris.com and we were well taken care of but it is a company of photographers so they want you to get the shots. I never went on the really difficult trips. I'm old and have never been much of an athlete. PhysEd was my least favorite class in school though I did enjoy hiking in my early teen years. The animals are what drew me to the wild places. I have many fabulous memories and acquired a lifetime friend. She and I were traveling alone to the Masai Mara and they put us together as roommates. We laughed always during any troubles.

 

Paulette

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10 minutes ago, NYCat said:

 

We were there the end of August-- beginning of September so it was dry season but, even so, we had a helluva trip in our bus along the Transpantaneira after a rainstorm. That mud is beyond slippery and we kept slithering sideways. For a while the owner of the lodge was following and helping us but he finally had to go back. I don't know if you ever traveled that way but there is bridge after bridge after bridge and you have to speed up getting to them to go up onto the wood. At one point there was a big drop-off and Joe VanOs had us get out of the bus. He said to bring our passports. The poor bus driver couldn't get off and, thank heavens, he made it and we got back on. A two hour trip took us nine hours. Most of the time there was no cell signal but we finally were able to reach a lodge along the way and they prepared us some lunch. I know this is mild compared to some of your trips. I went with photosafaris.com and we were well taken care of but it is a company of photographers so they want you to get the shots. I never went on the really difficult trips. I'm old and have never been much of an athlete. PhysEd was my least favorite class in school though I did enjoy hiking in my early teen years. The animals are what drew me to the wild places. I have many fabulous memories and acquired a lifetime friend. She and I were traveling alone to the Masai Mara and they put us together as roommates. We laughed always during any troubles.

 

Paulette

Great story. My daughter hated PhysEd, also. That said, she skated, rode her bicycle, and snow and water skied. I don’t think she liked organized sports in gym and especially hated the lack of privacy in the showers.

Photo Safaris sounds like the way to go.

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