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Hi everyone,  I would like to get advice from a professional photographer, if possible, about what is the best DSLR camera to use in your experience, which one should I buy for selling images through Alamy? I plan to take snapshots of still imagery (I believe that is what is called), in other words, only for still shots.  I want to get different views on how you guys utilize various cameras, so that then I can weigh in the best possible answer.  Thank you :)

 

 

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, jcampo said:

Hi everyone,  I would like to get advice from a professional photographer, if possible, about what is the best DSLR camera to use in your experience, which one should I buy for selling images through Alamy? I plan to take snapshots of still imagery (I believe that is what is called), in other words, only for still shots.  I want to get different views on how you guys utilize various cameras, so that then I can weigh in the best possible answer.  Thank you :)

 

 

'still imagery' doesn't quite quite cut it I'm afraid.

The answer to what camera you need is like how long is a piece of string. every camera has its plus and minus points.

What are you going to be taking pictures of? When are you taking them? what situation? Basically it all comes down to convenience. and what you can physically do with it. if you are always shooting indoors then a full frame may be better than apsc. but if you are always shooting birds outside then you may prefer the opposite. can you give more of a clue of your subjects?

Edited by James Hodgson
typo (probably others)
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Alamy doesn't take videos these days, so it's all going to be still photos.  You can use anything from an older 12 MP Nikon D300 (cheap, still good) to a very high MP newest model of Canon, Nikon, or go mirrorless and get Fuji or Sony.  Where are you and what kind of lenses can you find locally if you're not in the US or a major EU country or the right parts of China or Japan.  Buy the lenses and then the body.  I have mirrorless Sony cameras, one APSC a6000 and two a7 full frame cameras.  The a6000 is easy to carry and would be cheap to replace, and since the popup flash doesn't work anymore, I'll keep it until it dies and then give it to someone who wants to play with the electronics.   I like Sony mirrorless because they're lighter than my former Nikon D300.  Basically, if you can find a lightly used somewhat older camera, you can get into a system cheaper.    Think system, not individual camera body model.   Can you get the lenses for what you want to do? 

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I highly recommend the Nikon D5.  Most of my news work is fast moving and low light.  The D5 works well in low light and shoots at 12 frames per second.  Costs about USD 6,000 plus lens.  Downside is that it is very heavy, loud and large so no inconspicuous Street photography.

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43 minutes ago, IanDavidson said:

I highly recommend the Nikon D5.  Most of my news work is fast moving and low light.  The D5 works well in low light and shoots at 12 frames per second.  Costs about USD 6,000 plus lens.  Downside is that it is very heavy, loud and large so no inconspicuous Street photography.

The Canon equivalent the 1DX is great if you do a lot of news or sport. Again expensive. I find the lighter Canon 6d to be a good stills stock camera and the new canon mirror less seem to be the ideal comprise of quality and lightness. 

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Posted (edited)

You do really need to give the forum a bit more information. If you just want to dip your toe in the water of stock photography you don't need an expensive camera to take pictures that will easily exceed the quality demanded by Alamy (and they are strict on quality) but if you've never used a DSLR before (rather than a phone perhaps) then you will have a bit of a learning curve but it won't be too steep and it will hopefully be very enjoyable.

 

The lessons you learn from using just an inexpensive DSLR will be very valuable in helping you decide what to get if and when you decide to invest more. I think I would be looking at at either a Micro 4/3 camera from the likes of Panasonic or Olympus or APS-C cameras from Nikon, Sony, Canon or Fuji together with a mid-range zoom lens. Some 'kit' lenses have good reputations and in your position it might even be better to choose the lens before choosing the camera brand.

 

Edited by Harry Harrison
and Fuji!
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You will get so many different answers to this question as nearly everyone will have their own preferences. You don't mention a budget but if budget is no issue then the latest and greatest Nikon, Canon or Sony models are probably what people might suggest. To be honest, almost any DSLR from the last decade would be good enough for stock photography. And do you truly mean DSLR or does your consideration include mirrorless cameras which would bring the likes of the Nikon Z6 and Z7 into the frame (so-to-speak) as well as more Sony cameras.

 

Personally I use a Nikon D7000 (can be purchased secondhand for £200) with a kit lens and a Sony RX100M3 (not a DSLR) .. but I am a hobbyist rather than a professional..

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Posted (edited)

I am guessing that jcampo is a beginner and the idea of him buying  D5 or Canon 1DX is more than a little over the top I think. The D5 is an incredibly expensive tool for a very specific type of professional photogapher. For beginners I would recommend the Nikon D3500 DSLR which is a superb entry level camera with amazing image quality and all that a beginner could possibly need, opening up the vast world of Nikon lenses and accessories should he continue with his hobby.

Edited by MDM
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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, MDM said:

I am guessing that jcampo is a beginner and the idea of him buying  D5 or Canon 1DX is more than a little over the top I think. The D5 is an incredibly expensive tool for a very specific type of professional photogapher. For beginners I would recommend the Nikon D3500 DSLR which is a superb entry level camera with amazing image quality and all that a beginner could possibly need, opening up the vast world of Nikon lenses and accessories should he continue with his hobby.

Agreed! Frankly any modern APS-C or full frame DSLR will supply files suitable for Alamy - so JCampo,  if you've money to spend - then buy good lenses!

🙂

Edited by TeeCee

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Most importantly, do you already have a camera that you are familiar with? If so, and if the sensor size is suitable, use that at first to see how you get on, and what sales you might make. If you are considering buying a camera just for shooting stock, are you aware what images sell, how much for, and what expertise is required before considering what could be a considerable financial outlay.

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I shoot with mirrorless Fuji X-T2. 24 MP.  The X-T3 is out so you should be able to get the T-2 at a reasonable price. Fuji has a superior lens lineup, which is important.

Click on my image count under my avatar and you can see the quality this (T-2) camera produces.

There are many options that give good quality, though. I used to shoot Nikon, but have celebrated going to the small, lighter size of the Fuji cams.

Some of my images were taken with the Sony RX100-3. The indoor Walmart ones, among others.

Betty

 

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Hello Javier, am I right in guessing it's your plan to buy a camera and then start contributing to Alamy? Just asking to see how we might best advise?

 

James

 

 

 

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Just watched a quick first impression YouTube video on the new Nikon Z50.. I'm liking the looks of that!

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Canon 5D Mark IV which is perfect, but big and "suspicious", wanting to "scale back a bit", so consider going mirrorless - frontrunner being the Fujifilm X-T2 or X-T3, but also considering Sony RX-10 or even RX-100. We'll see.

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On ‎08‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 17:20, jcampo said:

Hi everyone,  I would like to get advice from a professional photographer, if possible, about what is the best DSLR camera to use in your experience, which one should I buy for selling images through Alamy? I plan to take snapshots of still imagery (I believe that is what is called), in other words, only for still shots.  I want to get different views on how you guys utilize various cameras, so that then I can weigh in the best possible answer.  Thank you :)

 

 

JC,

 

Your question is not possible to answer, my opinion.  There are way too many DSLR's that can make images suitable for Alamy.  I have images on Alamy shot with Leica M2's, M-6's, Nikon D100's and most film Nikon's produced from 1959 to 1999, FUJI S-2's and S-5's and my most licensed image shot with a Kodak / Nikon DCS-620.  I am currently using Nikon D800's and a D700.  There was a time when Nikon was my go to system, then Canon as a film Pro user for decades.  NOTE: in my opinion the Canon FD Pro lenses were the best, beating out Olympus by a hair.  The Olympus film cameras were great as well.

 

When you invest in a system (Glass or lenses) it pays to stay with it.  I remember in the 80's when I had three Canon F-1's and glass from 16 to 500, Leica M2's and M6's with glass from 21 to 135 and Two Hasselblad EL's with glass from 40 to 250, I thought that it does not get better than this, WOW was I wrong.  

 

I must say that I got a lot of support from Nikon in the 80's and 90's and NONE now, but I am a Nikon user and have a few lenses that are older then many of the Alamy contributors.

 

My opinion For What It Is Worth......

 

Chuck

Edited by Chuck Nacke
gramer
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I live in Caracas, Venezuela. Caracas is in top list of most dangerous cities in the world. If difficult go around with a big DSLR camera, in the Caracas city. I thing, if it's possible use compact cameras with some quality suitable for Alamy parameters. I saw in $200 a Sony RX100, i don't know if that camera works for Alamy Quality?

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14 minutes ago, alexandersr said:

I live in Caracas, Venezuela. Caracas is in top list of most dangerous cities in the world. If difficult go around with a big DSLR camera, in the Caracas city. I thing, if it's possible use compact cameras with some quality suitable for Alamy parameters. I saw in $200 a Sony RX100, i don't know if that camera works for Alamy Quality?

 

All will be answered here: https://discussion.alamy.com/search/?q=rx100 , if you have a day or two to spare.

Short answer: yes if your photography and editing skills are good enough and don't expect it to be a dslr.

 

wim

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Sigma just introduced the FP, a "pocket-size" mirrorless camera with full frame sensor for $1900.

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8 hours ago, alexandersr said:

I live in Caracas, Venezuela. Caracas is in top list of most dangerous cities in the world. If difficult go around with a big DSLR camera, in the Caracas city. I thing, if it's possible use compact cameras with some quality suitable for Alamy parameters. I saw in $200 a Sony RX100, i don't know if that camera works for Alamy Quality?

I have pictures on here shot with the RX100. If you shoot it at low ISO, or use one of the night modes (don’t remember which) for darker environments, you can be successful with it. It’s best shot in good light. I have learned to do some things with it using

selective noise reduction.  The Fuji cameras seem to not need as much care.

Not knowing your abilities, (are you just now getting into photography?) or whether you have good software for developing the photos, it’s hard to advise.

Betty

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I have photos here shot with the original RX100. Not having a viewfinder is a frustration in bright light but if you happen to have a Hoodman loupe for looking at the back of a DSLR   https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1353036-REG/hoodman_h30mb_hoodloupe_3_0_outdoor_loop.html  it is actually possible to fasten it on for excellent viewing of the back screen.

 

Paulette

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To sum it all up:

 

There is no "best".

 

If there was, we'd all be using it.

 

DD

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13 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I have pictures on here shot with the RX100. If you shoot it at low ISO, or use one of the night modes (don’t remember which) for darker environments, you can be successful with it. It’s best shot in good light. I have learned to do some things with it using

selective noise reduction.  The Fuji cameras seem to not need as much care.

Not knowing your abilities, (are you just now getting into photography?) or whether you have good software for developing the photos, it’s hard to advise.

Betty

Thank you, i'm intermediate to advance in photography. I use Adobe Photoshop and LightRoom.

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8 hours ago, alexandersr said:

Thank you, i'm intermediate to advance in photography. I use Adobe Photoshop and LightRoom.

Then you should get along fine with any of the RX100 series. There are some here that shoot with nothing else.

 

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On 13/10/2019 at 18:42, sooth said:

Sigma just introduced the FP, a "pocket-size" mirrorless camera with full frame sensor for $1900.

Pocket size until you put a lens on it.

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