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39 minutes ago, AlbertSnapper said:

I made a rhubarb and raspberry crumble this afternoon. Anybody want some ? ūüėč

 

Now processing some pictures... ūüėź

 

Rhubarb and apple crumble here. Caramelised fruit as in a Gordon Ramsay  recipe and a little nutmeg in the crumble.  Nothing like it!

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2 hours ago, Bryan said:

Excitement this aftenoon as I watched a small rat run across my allotment and into the neighbour's plot.  Had I brought a semi automatic weapon and a few rounds of ammo, I could have missed the rat but destroyed next door's polytunnel as collateral damage.

 

You didn't happen to have your spade at hand?

I stood next to my grandfather once in his backyard when we spotted a rat running along a board. He reached behind him for his spade, the one we call a German spade and the Germans call an Idealspaten (though that's a brand name): a heavy rather narrow very sharp blade with a long handle and a T shaped end. It's for clay. He swung it forward in one smooth motion and it flew, blade forward, six or seven meters cutting the rat in two.

He must have had lots of practice. He was in his late sixties, I was about 15.

 

wim

 

edit: a spade like this

 

 

Edited by wiskerke
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11 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

 

Rhubarb and apple crumble here. Caramelised fruit as in a Gordon Ramsay  recipe and a little nutmeg in the crumble.  Nothing like it!

 

My friend's Mum gave me a recipe for the crumble topping that I make.

As before when I made it, the crumble resembled concrete. But much harder !

 

Your crumble sounds nice. Enjoy ūüėč

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My day’s been filled with a range of fun activities. This afternoon involved wheel barrowing just over a tonne of compost around to our new raised veg patch and then tonight I had the joy of finding the toilet wouldn’t flush. This led to a thrilling night of everyone’s favourite game...... rodding drains, what fun I’ve been having:)

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3 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

You didn't happen to have your spade at hand?

I stood next to my grandfather once in his backyard when we spotted a rat running along a board. He reached behind him for his spade, the one we call a German spade and the Germans call an Idealspaten (though that's a brand name): a heavy rather narrow very sharp blade with a long handle and a T shaped end. It's for clay. He swung it forward in one smooth motion and it flew, blade forward, six or seven meters cutting the rat in two.

He must have had lots of practice. He was in his late sixties, I was about 15.

 

wim

 

edit: a spade like this

 

 

You have to be impressed by a person who can bisect a rat with a thrown spade!  I was using the wrong sort of tool, a garden rake in fact, but had I had a spade to hand would no doubt have missed the rat and taken out a row of cabbages.   

 

It was my grandfather who introduced me to gardening. My dad kept the garden tidy but had no real interest, but my grandfather built a greenhouse from scrap timber and even installed a second hand piped heating system. He taught me how to plant leeks using a dibber, and to remove the seed leaves from brassicas and drown them in when transplanting etc.

 

I've tried to interest our grandchildren, recently organising the World Series pea growing competition, but the lure of electronic gadgetry is all pervasive, and I've made little progress.

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3 hours ago, Bionic said:

My day’s been filled with a range of fun activities. This afternoon involved wheel barrowing just over a tonne of compost around to our new raised veg patch and then tonight I had the joy of finding the toilet wouldn’t flush. This led to a thrilling night of everyone’s favourite game...... rodding drains, what fun I’ve been having:)

 

I once used an expired Christmas tree to rod a drain, not to be recommended, as the branches sprang back into position as it was removed producing a shower of .......

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1 hour ago, Bryan said:

You have to be impressed by a person who can bisect a rat with a thrown spade!  I was using the wrong sort of tool, a garden rake in fact, but had I had a spade to hand would no doubt have missed the rat and taken out a row of cabbages.   

 

It was my grandfather who introduced me to gardening. My dad kept the garden tidy but had no real interest, but my grandfather built a greenhouse from scrap timber and even installed a second hand piped heating system. He taught me how to plant leeks using a dibber, and to remove the seed leaves from brassicas and drown them in when transplanting etc.

 

I've tried to interest our grandchildren, recently organising the World Series pea growing competition, but the lure of electronic gadgetry is all pervasive, and I've made little progress.

 

I'm rubbish at gardening. Besides this is all we have. But I do have a dibber!

Just never knew it was called a dibber. Thank you!

Dibber - only 474 x on Alamy.

Plus: one more thing the Romans did for us.

Hmm no mention of any dibber here. ūüėā

 

wim

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4 hours ago, wiskerke said:

 

I'm rubbish at gardening. Besides this is all we have. But I do have a dibber!

Just never knew it was called a dibber. Thank you!

Dibber - only 474 x on Alamy.

 

wim

 

But you have covered every available mm with plants, a magnificent effort !

 

Perhaps you should investigate a Volkstuinen ?

 

Re Dibber, that reminds me of the time I tried to buy a Gimlet in France.

Edited by Bryan
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Went for my walk down to the river and along to the lock and back.  Blasted runners and cyclists are not adhering to the two meter rule, well some are but a lot do not. I am going to take a meter long pole next time and hold it out to the side so they will have to go around it. Should be a bit exciting as the tow path to the lock is about two meters wide so the runners and cyclists will have to go into the river to get round me.

 

I was just thinking that this is going to be the longest holiday I have ever had - and the cheapest.

 

Allan

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Went for my walk down to the river and along to the lock and back.  Blasted runners and cyclists are not adhering to the two meter rule, well some are but a lot do not. I am going to take a meter long pole next time and hold it out to the side so they will have to go around it. Should be a bit exciting as the tow path to the lock is about two meters wide so the runners and cyclists will have to go into the river to get round me.

 

 

I last walked only a few hundred yards on a local canal towpath a few weeks before the lockdown, and as it felt unsafe I exited ASAP. The CRT have since advised that you do not exercise on towpaths. Even though the light was not ideal, harsh and contrasty, I got the photo's I had been thinking about for some time. Yesterdays walk was 9.9 km on local footpaths across fields, country lanes, a B road the through a housing estate. On roads I would cross over if meeting another walker, preferring the road width than 2M. Easy now with minimal traffic.  I will record anything interesting I come across with a camera I rarely use now, a Nikon D7200 with its 16-85mm lens. Once I'm familiar with my RX100 MK7 that will probably end up as my walk about camera. Now for a tidy up I've been putting off for some time. 

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10 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

 

Re Dibber, that reminds me of the time I tried to buy a Gimlet in France.

 

Somehow that reminds me of trying to buy tampons in a pharmacy in Thailand a long time ago in 1986 when little English was spoken.

 

My wife was back in the hotel sick so it was down to me. 

 

I still cringe at the miming that I resorted to in the shop.¬†ūüėó

 

Why we didn't think of getting the hotel to write it down for us in Thai I don't know. We were young and stupid. 

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21 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Went for my walk down to the river and along to the lock and back.  Blasted runners and cyclists are not adhering to the two meter rule, well some are but a lot do not. I am going to take a meter long pole next time and hold it out to the side so they will have to go around it. Should be a bit exciting as the tow path to the lock is about two meters wide so the runners and cyclists will have to go into the river to get round me.

 

Allan

 

 

We have the coast to coast C2C cycle path running nearby, and it is seeing increased usage during lockdown. I'm a keen cyclist, but have been avoiding it of late as it is crowded by folk cycling too fast and not using a bell, people walking dogs that are not on a lead, or using a lead that is 10m long, sweaty runners who barge in and want to own the path, families occupying the entire width of the path etc etc. Confrontations are frequent. There needs to be rules of the path applied. Cyclists slow down and use a bell, all dogs on short leads, everyone keep left, runners only pass if there is ample room to do so etc. Proportional policing required, all offenders to be flogged.

Edited by Bryan
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2 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

We have the coast to coast C2C cycle path running nearby, and it is seeing increased usage during lockdown. I'm a keen cyclist, but have been avoiding it of late as it is crowded by folk cycling too fast and not using a bell, people walking dogs that are not on a lead, or using a lead that is 10m long, sweaty runners who barge in and want to own the path, families occupying the entire width of the path etc etc. Confrontations are frequent. There needs to be rules of the path applied. Cyclists slow down and use a bell, all dogs on short leads, everyone keep left, runners only pass if there is ample room to do so etc. Proportional policing required, all offenders to be flogged.

Those rules of the path could catch on, especially the flogging bit! 

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One self-isolation activity I hadn't bargained on is saving money. No more take-away food; it's nearly all home-cooked. I'd forgotten just how nutritious boring a baked potato can be, and it's easy to classify a bowl of cornflakes as a meal!

 

No visits to the pub, just a few cans from the supermarket. The petrol gauge of my vehicle has remained 'half full' for a month. No 'impulse  buys', but just stocking up on the basics.

 

No new clothes; I buy my threads from charity shops (if you saw me, this would be obvious!).

 

Maybe I'm learning some valuable lessons about 'home economics. Or maybe, when the lockdown is over, I'll go on a massive spending spree. Who knows?

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42 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

One self-isolation activity I hadn't bargained on is saving money. No more take-away food; it's nearly all home-cooked. I'd forgotten just how nutritious boring a baked potato can be, and it's easy to classify a bowl of cornflakes as a meal!

 

No visits to the pub, just a few cans from the supermarket. The petrol gauge of my vehicle has remained 'half full' for a month. No 'impulse  buys', but just stocking up on the basics.

 

No new clothes; I buy my threads from charity shops (if you saw me, this would be obvious!).

 

Maybe I'm learning some valuable lessons about 'home economics. Or maybe, when the lockdown is over, I'll go on a massive spending spree. Who knows?

 

Husband: you know what's great about confinement? We don't spend any money.

Me: Click, add to cart.

 

(Not mine but can't share it here)

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On 12/04/2020 at 01:44, Bryan said:

 

I once used an expired Christmas tree to rod a drain, not to be recommended, as the branches sprang back into position as it was removed producing a shower of .......

Also remember when taking out the old Christmas tree to make sure it is narrower than the doorway, otherwise you end up with a pile of needles in the doorway!

 

John.

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On 11/04/2020 at 14:00, Thyrsis said:

 

We have a half acre plot so lots to compost! Two big containers made from pallets, one with fresh stuff rotting down and one with the previous year’s compost. That goes onto the vegetable beds along with some local manure and the rotting down stuff gets turned over into the empty side. 

Fascinating stuff eh?!

 

 

I'm a 3 bin man myself!

 

1 for new green stuff, 1 rotting away and ready for 'mining' and another for 'mined' compost.

 

In this case, once i've mined the middle bin I will turn the right hand bin's contents into the middle bin and start again. Fascinating - well maybe!

 

John.

 

home-made-3-three-bin-compost-heap-garden-bins-CXJERE.jpg

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No images of our compost bins on Alamy! So here is our wisteria from a few years ago. Not quite out at the moment.

japanese-wisteria-CW0W3K.jpg

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Not to be outdone on the compost front, our bin is made from old wooden pallets held together by plastic ties. Fresh stuff goes in the left, and once a year the right is emptied and the LHS chucked across. We are fortunate in that the local riding stables provide a free suppy of horse muck/bedding which mixes with the vegetable remains from the garden. Getting allotment withdrawal symptoms as I write this, need to get out......

 

An allotment compost bin made from recycled pallets. Stock Photo

 

Or at home 

 

 

A chicken wire cage used to hold leaves to make leaf mould, England, UK Stock Photo

 

Making leaf mould

 

Amateur gardener with a handful of leaf mould, England, UK - Stock Image

 

lovely stuff!

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, Bryan said:

Not to be outdone on the compost front, our bin is made from old wooden pallets held together by plastic ties. Fresh stuff goes in the left, and once a year the right is emptied and the LHS chucked across. We are fortunate in that the local riding stables provide a free suppy of horse muck/bedding which mixes with the vegetable remains from the garden. Getting allotment withdrawal symptoms as I write this, need to get out......

 

An allotment compost bin made from recycled pallets. Stock Photo

 

Or at home 

 

 

A chicken wire cage used to hold leaves to make leaf mould, England, UK Stock Photo

 

Making leaf mould

 

Amateur gardener with a handful of leaf mould, England, UK - Stock Image

 

lovely stuff!

 

 

 

 

Found this Guy very interesting Bryan. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LH6-w57Slw

 

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There was a coyote at the end of my street as I was walking around twilight, so now I'm taking my two walks a day in the late morning and mid-afternoon. We live on a main road within walking distance to town, but we have a huge herd of deer that regularly run through our yard, sometimes to scary and startling effect, and various rabbits (though fewer bunnies since a bobcat was seen two doors down last summer). One surviving pair of rabbits and their offspring lived under a large bush in our yard last year. 

 

I was going to turn the compost pile today but it was pouring, so I just printed out a new recipe for orange cranberry bread. We were going to make Swedish meatballs (using cranberries instead of lingonberries, since they don't sell the latter near us) but hubs decided to make regular spaghetti & meatballs instead, so I'm about to bake some bread. The cinnamon coffee cake I made last week was delish and we had no trouble eating all 15 servings before it went stale.

 

I have not gotten on a scale since this started and luckily my sweatpants fit fine. I

 

Should take some pix as I bake but I don't need to wash my hands many extra times (before touching camera with sticky fingers for each stage, again to go back to the food so 2 x ?  )

My hands look 20 years older than I do despite liberal amounts of hand cream. Trying different hand creams to see which works best is another leisure activity LOL. So far no recommendations. 

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17 hours ago, Bryan said:

 

We have the coast to coast C2C cycle path running nearby, and it is seeing increased usage during lockdown. I'm a keen cyclist, but have been avoiding it of late as it is crowded by folk cycling too fast and not using a bell, people walking dogs that are not on a lead, or using a lead that is 10m long, sweaty runners who barge in and want to own the path, families occupying the entire width of the path etc etc. Confrontations are frequent. There needs to be rules of the path applied. Cyclists slow down and use a bell, all dogs on short leads, everyone keep left, runners only pass if there is ample room to do so etc. Proportional policing required, all offenders to be flogged.

 

UK solution from 1901.

Solution from Texas (ok a bit predictable).

But not that uncommon : velodog. More here in the online bicycle museum.

There was a time ca. 1880 that bicycle manufacturers gave away for free one of those with the purchase of a bike.

Although Smith and Wesson may have done the opposite.

These being free giveaways may be urban legends though.

 

A squirt gun maybe? I know that one dates back to 1880 as well, but here's is a more modern approach.

 

wim

 

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