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Can covid-19 disease outbreak influence photos sales worldwide?

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This old map image concept was once about globalization and how we are all connected over the internet. I just added "covid-19"as a keyword.

On the home front we have a 20 day supply of meds and food on hand.

The Prime Minister of Canada and his wife are today in self isolation pending outcome of tests.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-trudeau-in-self-isolation-as-wife-sophie-tested-for-new-coronavirus/

 

map-of-the-world-with-lines-of-communica

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12 minutes ago, Bill Brooks said:

This old map image concept was once about globalization and how we are all connected over the internet. I just added "covid-19"as a keyword.

On the home front we have a 20 day supply of meds and food on hand.

The Prime Minister of Canada and his wife are today in self isolation pending outcome of tests.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-trudeau-in-self-isolation-as-wife-sophie-tested-for-new-coronavirus/

 

 

 

The NHL season has been cancelled as well, which is a bit like banning religion in Canada.

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Posted (edited)
On ‎11‎/‎03‎/‎2020 at 09:04, stipe said:

I was wondering if covid-19 disease outbreak can influence (negatively) photo sales worldwide by stock agencies somehow. Most of my photos here on Alamy are travel related, for example. Consequently, being tourism industry is one of the main victims of coronavirus outbreak I expect to see a partial drop of my sales in the next few weeks. Or not? It would be interesting to hear here anyone enough old on Alamy to let us know his direct experiences about sales during difficult times such as the 9/11 or the 2008 global economical crisis.

What are your thoughts about it?

 

Stefano

Travel Photographer

Sorry to say, but in my opinion "Travel Photography" NOT Photojournalism is a going to be a thing of the past

for a period of time.  Addition: I was writing about making it not licensing it.  P.S. I am more concerned about

my children then licensing images right now.

 

I've seen a few major stories (human disasters) in my time, but this (COVID-19) appears to be really large and it

is time for all to act like adults.

 

I also believe that really well thought out and well captioned images of what is happening are going to be important

for a long time to come.

 

Chuck / semi retired photojournalist 

Edited by Chuck Nacke
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Posted (edited)

 

Edited by Marianne

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16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Marianne, call outlying towns, smaller ones, and see if they have it in stock. Transfer your prescription if they do. That’s what I had to do. If your taking estrogen and progesterone, maybe stop it. You might trade hot flashes for migraines. I did. Hot flashes are miserable but they don’t hurt. 😄

 

Thanks Betty et ai, . Hot flashes have been a thing of the past for years, Betty, I'm over 60. My migraines originally stopped at age 48. Not sure why I then started getting vestibular migraines (pain and horrible vertigo lasting up to two weeks), in the past few years, but the most recent seem to be a result of medicine I've been given for Sjogren's Syndrome, to help with the dry mouth that was hurting so badly it kept me up at night. I've stopped that medicine, but the replacement seems to be having the same effect. Meanwhile, as you recommended Betty, I have been calling around to pharmacies for the anti-seizure stuff that I actually take for Fibromyalgia. I've never had seizures,  but if I run out and stop it abruptly, I could. 

 

We need to manufacture more here - medicine, face masks, etc. NY is making their own hand sanitizer with prison labor. What a world huh? My husband made us hand sanitizer with Aloe Vera and alcohol. One batch should last us. 

 

Just got off the phone with a friend who may have just recovered from coronavirus. She takes the subway daily. Her whole family was sick, fever, chest pain, etc. One of her 20-something daughters ended up hospitalized due to her asthma with the fever, etc. Her tests for flu and pneumonia came back negative. Although she had all the symptoms, the NYC hospital she was in would not test here for Covid-19 since she hadn't been to China, S Korea or Italy - traveling on the subway in a city of millions of people wasn't enough. They said once her fever went down she probably wouldn't be contagious and could go back to work. Craziness. It would really have behooved them to test her to see if there is continuing community transmission, since the guy sho started the Westchester epidemic may well have gotten it traveling on the subway or who knows how but he got it . They are clearly underreporting and don't have enough tests. But how do we contain it if even people who are hospitalized and test negative for flu and pneumonia don't get tested? They said maybe she could wear a mask but they didn't give her one and there haven't been any available for weeks. 

 

The best thing would be to manufacture masks so we could help sick friends if needed and even so people could go out and be less likely to spread it. I worry for people like you Betty, Ed and Alan who live alone. With proper masks you could be cared for at home if you get sick. If my friends had it, it was like a bad flu (but it wasn't the flu) and her 50-something husband and other daughter who both have asthma made it through without hospitalization. It would sure be helpful to know if they had it, if we are going to learn more about transmission and survival. And more testing could mean the survival rate is higher than we think. 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Marianne said:

the NYC hospital she was in would not test here for Covid-19 since she hadn't been to China, S Korea or Italy

Anyone told them you don't have to have been there! Scandalous. The reason you have fewer cases is........you're not testing enough people! Your testing rate is a twentieth of ours.

Anything to do with the test costing $3000, as has been reported?😉

 

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I'm actually seeing quite a few travel-related zooms -- and some sales -- this month, so I don't think that all is lost in that department. Travel publications and websites always think far ahead. Coronavirus will pass (the sooner the better).

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5 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

I'm actually seeing quite a few travel-related zooms -- and some sales -- this month, so I don't think that all is lost in that department. Travel publications and websites always think far ahead. Coronavirus will pass (the sooner the better).

 

 

Yes and if you can't go somewhere the next best thing is to read about it and think about the future. 

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3 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

 

 

Yes and if you can't go somewhere the next best thing is to read about it and think about the future. 

 

There might even be a surge in demand, especially for "local" and "domestic" travel images as people will be reluctant to venture too far from home, which should have the side-effect of being good for the planet (less air pollution), but not of course for the cruise and airline industries. 

 

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Posted (edited)
40 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

The reason you have fewer cases is........you're not testing enough people! Your testing rate is a twentieth of ours.

Anything to do with the test costing $3000, as has been reported?😉

 

That social media meme about the cost of tests in the US has been debunked .

 

It is beyond doubt that the number of cases in the UK is far greater than the number of confirmed cases. The UK Government Chief Scientific Adviser has this evening said that the number of actual cases in the UK is likely to be 10-20 times the confirmed number - see 19.06 on the linked page. The capacity of for testing is way less here than what would be required for accurate information. And still they are doing almost nothing except blatering about what they might do in a week or two when the situation is exponentially far worse. Deal with it now - not a chance. We can't see it so let's pretend it's not happening for a little while longer, no doubt for economic reasons. Learn a lesson from Italy. Not a chance. Unbelievable. 

 

 

 

Edited by MDM
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1 minute ago, MDM said:

That social media meme about the cost of tests in the US has been debunked .

Just $1000 to visit the doctor and/or ER, then! That's a relief😉

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1 minute ago, spacecadet said:

Just $1000 to visit the doctor and/or ER, then! That's a relief😉

 

I think insurance covers the cost. American health care is beyond the scope of my knowledge and likely to stay that way. Life is too short and might be getting even shorter than envisaged. 😎

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3 minutes ago, MDM said:

 

I think insurance covers the cost. American health care is beyond the scope of my knowledge and likely to stay that way. Life is too short and might be getting even shorter than envisaged. 😎

One hears that most insurance has a large excess to pay and a also a contribution to medication. And insurance is mostly conditional on employment. That hasn't been debunked.

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One way to ensure it spreads more is to charge for the test. If people cannot afford the test through lack of insurance cover they will put it off until it becomes urgent, meanwhile spreading the virus around.

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That’s very good news. Congratulations on your mother’s improving health!

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, riccarbi said:

Be positive. After a week with serious fever and cough and no way to make her drink and feed enough, my 93-year-old mum is no longing having fever since yesterday morning. Thanks to my sister, a neurologist who came from Genoa to assist her and my barely useful help (I am an architect, though I'd been a voluntary paramedic in my youth), she is alive and well.  She clearly got the COVID-19, all doctors agree with it, though there was no way to test her, since they can only test people who is serious respiratory distress (they did about 5,000 tests in Lombardy only, yesterday). Therefore, if a 93-old bad-tempered lady can survive the virus, everybody can. This virus is not invincible.


Fantastic 👏👏👏 and best of luck to her. My father got pneumonia in his mid-80s and it went mostly undiagnosed as I don’t think he even went to the doctor until he was almost through it.  I don’t know if it was viral or bacterial but he survived and he had a copd from his years of smoking. 

 

56 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

One hears that most insurance has a large excess to pay and a also a contribution to medication. And insurance is mostly conditional on employment. That hasn't been debunked.


I believe you. Let’s hope the NHS can cope when it really takes off. 

Edited by MDM
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17 minutes ago, riccarbi said:

Be positive. After a week with serious fever and cough and no way to make her drink and eat enough, my 93-year-old mum is no longing having fever since yesterday morning. Thanks to my sister, a neurologist who came from Genoa to assist her and my barely useful help (I am an architect, though I'd been a voluntary paramedic in my youth), she is alive and well.  She clearly got the COVID-19, all doctors agree with it, though there was no way to test her, since they can only test people who is serious respiratory distress and happily she had not been so (the NHS did about 5,000 tests in Lombardy only, yesterday, but only to people with pneumonia). Therefore, if a 93-old bad-tempered lady can survive the virus, everybody can. This virus is not invincible.

That is very good to hear. My mum is 92 and Ian’s mum is 98 and we are concerned for them both.

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I worry for people like you Betty, Ed and Alan who live alone. With proper masks you could be cared for at home if you get sick.
True, but I think persons living alone “might” stand a better chance of not getting it. As we make rare trips for supplies, we know our own hand washing responsibility, but you can’t force a family member to be as careful, and you don’t know if they are doing things like touching their faces. I know what I do, but I wouldn’t necessarily know what a family member is doing.

 

Of course, if I get it, I’m probably out of luck because the one person in town that could care for me (my daughter) has an autoimmune disease like you, Marianne. She catches everything!  I’d probably keep my illness a secret from her as long as I could. 

I did get a few masks back in January, but they aren’t the absolute safest proper ones. I got them when little was known what worked and didn’t work. Even so, they were the last box in the store.

The NCAA basketball tournament that was announced yesterday it would still go on but without fans has been cancelled completely today. it’s sad, but if it helps contain community spread I’m for it. We have 3 more cases in Kansas now, making it 4. All are in the Kansas City area, though. Pretty far from me.

Betty

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I don't know if my small photography income will be affected but I just had a cat-sitting client let me know she is coming home three days early so I'll have to give her a refund for that time. I'm sure things will be very s...l...o....w for a while but suspect once we are free of constraints people will travel a lot.

 

Paulette

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My zooms this past week are very healthy, and my CTR has soared. But I have absolutely no sales for March. I doubt the person who zoomed 65 more images along with mine will choose mine.

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9 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

 

I worry for people like you Betty, Ed and Alan who live alone. With proper masks you could be cared for at home if you get sick.

 

 

I presume you meant Allan since I've never mentioned I live alone. At 72 I'm supposedly in the high risk category but I'm perfectly healthy and have hardly troubled the NHS for most of my life. I may well catch Covid19 (though I'm quite happy sitting at home and not going out for a while so I have less chance of doing so) but I'm not at all worried about it. I'm hoping, and expecting, that it will just be like a bad dose of flu.

 

Alan

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Posted (edited)

At this point, in Central America, Honduras, Panama, and Costa Rica have verified cases, while Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua don't.   We have had people planning to come anyway if they can, some imagining that getting out in the countryside will be an escape from the virus.   Nobody quite knows if the various health agencies have test kits to verify cases or not.  Guatemala, El Salvador, and Belize seem to be restricting some to a lot of travel.   Guatemala is closed to Europeans and returning citizens will be quarantined for 14 days. 

 

The US and the UK seem to be deliberately under testing and under reporting.   Cuba has reported two cases after not reporting any.   Cases in Central America are from either tourists from the US or from nationals returning from trips to Italy.   Hadn't realized Italy was such a popular travel destination for wealthier Central Americans, but here are immigrant families from there who've done well. 

Edited by MizBrown

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Posted (edited)

Glad your elderly mom is on the mend.

 

Here in the US it appears that our government is close to a bill that will make tests free. I'm grateful for people like Nancy Pelosi, who, despite her advanced age, (79) is urging both houses of Congress to stay until they can agree on a bill to help saying, “We are the captains of the ship. We are the last to leave.” Let's hope most of the men in Congress are as brave as she is, it seems like many are, and hopefully they will put their differences aside and get us some help. Here in NY our Governor is being proactive and trying to do as much as he can, though there are certainly shortages, including a severe shortage of tests.

 

Hospitals, doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals don't want to hide the numbers, but since there are nowhere near enough tests, they are saving them for those who become ill and are at high risk, since it is more important that someone at risk of death get an accurate diagnosis, than someone who is ill but not in serious distress. Though it would seem like anyone sick enough to be hospitalized should be tested, with severe shortages it's currently not possible. It's irresponsible to say anyone should be tested even if they have no symptoms, when there aren't even enough tests for those who are quite sick.

 

Sure, it seems unfair that someone who is ill but not in severe distress can't get a test and may have to be quarantined just to be safe, but we are all being told to self-isolate anyway. Ultimately, the decisions being made on how best to use scarce resources should be left up to health care workers. Not one story I've read or heard about testing or not testing had anything to do with whether the person had insurance or the ability to pay for the test. 

 

The worst fault here is not our healthcare system (I'm a fan of the European system, but that's beside the point).  The more serious issue is that we had a few month's warning and did nothing to come up with a test, testing guidelines, or a plan for the inevitable epidemic. In fact, the epidemic response team set up by President Obama was dismantled. All the money and insurance in the world won't get you a hospital bed or a ventilator if there isn't a a bed left. And that's really the biggest threat. 

 

There should be a protocol for testing health care workers, cops, firefighters, food industry workers, and others for whom it is essential that they do their job and be around other people. This is where the lack of preparedness has really gotten us down.

 

Grocery store shelves are already empty. The national guard is delivering food to quarantined people in New Rochelle, a town about 20 miles from here hit the hardest in NY so far. it's going to be a lot harder when one town becomes hundreds. I guess empty shelves show people are trying to prepare, though of course some are hoarding too. 

 

I have seen our country pull together many times. After Hurricane Sandy, we had carpenters from Mississippi putting up light poles and utility workers from Massachusetts stringing up the lights on our street here in NY. This is different since it will affect so many more people, but I have faith that people will still pull together. And some will hoard and make things worse. It's human nature. 

 

The United States is not just our government, we the people are stronger when we stand together and most of us actually care about our friends and neighbors. Just like most other people around the world. 

Edited by Marianne
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