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21 minutes ago, LawrensonPhoto said:

YES!!!

Well done. Is this yours? 

T4C0N2

 

I checked the feed a little earlier and I couldn't see any. Now I see there is at least one batch.

 

I was just wondering how effective Alamy really is with proper breaking news. This is happening in a big world city, so there must be some Alamy photographers nearby? 

 

Edit: The only batch I can see is from Stoyan Vassev/TASS 

Edited by andremichel
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2 hours in and only 6 live news images on Alamy?  Rubbish.

Mind you, I saw images of the fire on Twitter first and then checked the news programmes to see what was happening.

So people on the ground tweeting are ahead of the news people?

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15 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

Mind you, I saw images of the fire on Twitter first and then checked the news programmes to see what was happening.

So people on the ground tweeting are ahead of the news people?

 

The present and future press photos of this sort.

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Not sure what its like in Europe now but here in the states every news company would be saying to their viewers , "send us your live photo's and video and we will do our best to feature them on our news report". They would get 100s of free images . 

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Is it just other agency photos that are coming through the live news feed?

Trying to figure out what has happened. Have they decided to only take on those who can contribute the most?

Edited by piperand
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I can see 26 pics of the fire in 2 sets.  Anyway, it's irrelevant as one of the big agencies has images available within minutes of the fire starting.

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With something like a fire, and many other news events, it's not all about speed and being the first one on the scene. The most dramatic shots may take place hours after it starts, such as part of the structure giving way.

 

I personally would hate to be off uploading when something like that happened, but I'm planning to do my best to conform to Live News standards. 

 

So go shoot, and do your thing, and don't worry about what other photographers or agencies may or may not already be there. They may be off keywording when you get the money shot. (And I don't mean to be crude in the face of tragedy; just using that as a generic industry term.)

 

But anyway, very sad for Notre Dame. I only visited it once, when I was younger, and didn't have the same appreciation for it I probably would now. I hope they save some of it.

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1 hour ago, KHA said:

But anyway, very sad for Notre Dame. I only visited it once, when I was younger, and didn't have the same appreciation for it I probably would now. I hope they save some of it.

I've been speaking to my fire service contact - he says the fire is unstoppable because it's so high.  Heartbreaking.

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10 minutes ago, Colblimp said:

I've been speaking to my fire service contact - he says the fire is unstoppable because it's so high.  Heartbreaking.

Thanks for the update. It seems weird that height would be a problem. Do they not have a fire plan in place for the Eiffel Tower, for instance?

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2 minutes ago, KHA said:

Thanks for the update. It seems weird that height would be a problem. Do they not have a fire plan in place for the Eiffel Tower, for instance?

Who knows...  I'm not sure a fire in any high building can be fought effectively - Twin Towers, Grenfell, that skyscraper in The Towering Inferno.

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Notre Dame is a very sad story,  I have walked past many times and I was in once.

 

On a more important note, I've covered a number of major stories, mostly for the international

media, print at a time, when all was shot on film and many of the most important images that

I did are posted now on Alamy. 

 

If I was working on assignment, via my agent at the time, for a weekly magazine they would

send a courier to pickup my unprocessed film every night or hour depending on the story. 

That was back in the days when even a mobile phone was a big deal.  The major wires had

photographers shooting, couriers picking up and techs at a base to process caption and

upload, on one story back in the 1990's in central Asia AP processed their film without

water (I am not joking) so a tech could "wet scan" no time to dry it and transmit it via satellite uplink.

 

I now think, Just my opinion, I understand what Alamy is attempting to do and once again they did not do it

well.  In my opinion News coverage and accreditation needs to be coordinated. 

 

On a number of large events, I've contacted Alamy in advance and they have been wonderful to work with.

I've found Alamy News extremely professional and efficient to work with, but I've been in the news photo

business for decades.  I also refuse to leave a story to edit and upload.  I would rather have an image

that is licensed for decades than one that makes the front page of the New York Times the next day

and is forgotten.

 

If you would like to see a small example of the type of "Photojounalism" I'm talking about go to

http://chucknacke.com/thezine.html

 

Chuck Nacke 

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19 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

I have this work and it is a classic.  Although, initially, it may seem dated, it is an outstanding manual of the craft of photojournalism.  

 

Um, the price.  Sounds like an interesting book, though. 

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2 hours ago, MizBrown said:

 

Um, the price.  Sounds like an interesting book, though. 

 

You can get it second hand in the UK for about £7 hardback and £15 paperback. I suspect that the hardback version is from 1978, and the paperback from 1997. Well worth it though.

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1 hour ago, Gerry Rousseau said:

April 3, I had flown from Vancouver to Hong Kong, I had Accreditation from Alamy News to cover the HK Rugby 7's.

It wasn't all business of course, it was pleasure as well. It being my third time for this event being held at Hong Kong Stadium, which is such a wonderful venue, with a gorgeous backdrop and an incredible fan base, and I was looking forward to shooting the Sevens again.

April 4, the day before the event I received my letter as well. At first it took me by surprise, and I wasn't sure how to feel. Obviously any photos I took would not be going any further than my laptop. 

I have nothing bad to say about Alamy News, Jessica and the team ( not sure if she is still there or not, or who all the team consisted of) have always been good people to deal with.

What got to me, was the lack of professionalism on the part of whoever is there now, might be the same people, I don't know.

I am very aware that it is Alamy's game board and they make the rules and have every right to decide how the game is played. But, one would think that if you have Accredited Photographers attending events or assignments, as a professional News outlet you should be aware of this, and you could maybe cull them afterwards. It would have been a more honorable approach.

 

Gerry Rousseau

 

 

Till now I thought Alamy's action was just crass and incompetent.

Now, it's shameful as well. Pulling the plug on someone you've actually accredited- I'm speechless.

Edited by spacecadet
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1 hour ago, Gerry Rousseau said:

April 3, I had flown from Vancouver to Hong Kong, I had Accreditation from Alamy News to cover the HK Rugby 7's.

It wasn't all business of course, it was pleasure as well. It being my third time for this event being held at Hong Kong Stadium, which is such a wonderful venue, with a gorgeous backdrop and an incredible fan base, and I was looking forward to shooting the Sevens again.

April 4, the day before the event I received my letter as well. At first it took me by surprise, and I wasn't sure how to feel. Obviously any photos I took would not be going any further than my laptop. 

I have nothing bad to say about Alamy News, Jessica and the team ( not sure if she is still there or not, or who all the team consisted of) have always been good people to deal with.

What got to me, was the lack of professionalism on the part of whoever is there now, might be the same people, I don't know.

I am very aware that it is Alamy's game board and they make the rules and have every right to decide how the game is played. But, one would think that if you have Accredited Photographers attending events or assignments, as a professional News outlet you should be aware of this, and you could maybe cull them afterwards. It would have been a more honorable approach.

 

Gerry Rousseau

 

 

I fully agree with you.

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1 hour ago, Gerry Rousseau said:

April 3, I had flown from Vancouver to Hong Kong, I had Accreditation from Alamy News to cover the HK Rugby 7's.

It wasn't all business of course, it was pleasure as well. It being my third time for this event being held at Hong Kong Stadium, which is such a wonderful venue, with a gorgeous backdrop and an incredible fan base, and I was looking forward to shooting the Sevens again.

April 4, the day before the event I received my letter as well. At first it took me by surprise, and I wasn't sure how to feel. Obviously any photos I took would not be going any further than my laptop. 

I have nothing bad to say about Alamy News, Jessica and the team ( not sure if she is still there or not, or who all the team consisted of) have always been good people to deal with.

What got to me, was the lack of professionalism on the part of whoever is there now, might be the same people, I don't know.

I am very aware that it is Alamy's game board and they make the rules and have every right to decide how the game is played. But, one would think that if you have Accredited Photographers attending events or assignments, as a professional News outlet you should be aware of this, and you could maybe cull them afterwards. It would have been a more honorable approach.

 

Gerry Rousseau

 

 

I am not buying this, I have dealt with Jessica many times without problem and under major difficult circumstances and also on much larger stories

than a Rugby Game, and she was professional and efficient.

 

I am going to send an email to Jessica and with her permission I will post her and Alamy's response to this thread.

 

Tired of this.

 

Chuck Nacke

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7 hours ago, Chuck Nacke said:

I understand what Alamy is attempting to do and once again they did not do it

well. 

Originally I agreed with you, it was the manner of its doing that upset me and many others. But now I see the news feed full of absolute rubbish - canadian dollar bills, a car museum, ice lollies - all submitted via agencies, and virtually no UK content,  I'm no longer sure that that I understand what Alamy is trying to do.

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4 minutes ago, Russell said:

Originally I agreed with you, it was the manner of its doing that upset me and many others. But now I see the news feed full of absolute rubbish - canadian dollar bills, a car museum, ice lollies - all submitted via agencies, and virtually no UK content,  I'm no longer sure that that I understand what Alamy is trying to do.

So maybe they've just thrown out the baby and the bathwater is still there. Including whatever the baby left in it.

I'll get my coat.

Edited by spacecadet
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I haven't read every post here - I do have a life - so can anyone that was taken off the live news list and that has since applied to join has been accepted or declined. I see many people complaining that they have been taken off the list, even those with press cards but have they applied to see if they can join.  I applied last week and am waiting to see the result. 

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12 hours ago, Colblimp said:

I can see 26 pics of the fire in 2 sets.  Anyway, it's irrelevant as one of the big agencies has images available within minutes of the fire starting.

 

This is probably true, but by cutting out the majority of their suppliers Alamy are now even less likely to have images within minutes.

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34 minutes ago, BobD said:

 

This is probably true, but by cutting out the majority of their suppliers Alamy are now even less likely to have images within minutes.

 

They had no images up for ages. The major UK news websites were running stories with a multitude of images from other outlets for some time before anything appeared on Alamy Live news feed. 

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9 hours ago, Chuck Nacke said:

Notre Dame is a very sad story,  I have walked past many times and I was in once.

 

On a more important note, I've covered a number of major stories, mostly for the international

media, print at a time, when all was shot on film and many of the most important images that

I did are posted now on Alamy. 

 

If I was working on assignment, via my agent at the time, for a weekly magazine they would

send a courier to pickup my unprocessed film every night or hour depending on the story. 

That was back in the days when even a mobile phone was a big deal.  The major wires had

photographers shooting, couriers picking up and techs at a base to process caption and

upload, on one story back in the 1990's in central Asia AP processed their film without

water (I am not joking) so a tech could "wet scan" no time to dry it and transmit it via satellite uplink.

 

I now think, Just my opinion, I understand what Alamy is attempting to do and once again they did not do it

well.  In my opinion News coverage and accreditation needs to be coordinated. 

 

On a number of large events, I've contacted Alamy in advance and they have been wonderful to work with.

I've found Alamy News extremely professional and efficient to work with, but I've been in the news photo

business for decades.  I also refuse to leave a story to edit and upload.  I would rather have an image

that is licensed for decades than one that makes the front page of the New York Times the next day

and is forgotten.

 

If you would like to see a small example of the type of "Photojounalism" I'm talking about go to

http://chucknacke.com/thezine.html

 

Chuck Nacke 

Reading this my thought is that the way major stories could be/should be run by serious news collectors now would involve twin card card cameras and runners on the ground to collect cards take them process them (do captioning keywording etc) return them swap them while the photographers are left to concentrate fully on the story second by second.

I do not know if that is possible - but if I had the resources to put more than one body at a story that is the way I would do it.

 

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35 minutes ago, Starsphinx said:

Reading this my thought is that the way major stories could be/should be run by serious news collectors now would involve twin card card cameras and runners on the ground to collect cards take them process them (do captioning keywording etc) return them swap them while the photographers are left to concentrate fully on the story second by second.

 

 

no need for runners collecting cards. News photographers can shoot/upload direct from their cameras via their phones (mobile or satellite). Images sent to their agencies in real time. Edited  captioned / sent to the news desks in seconds.

 

This is what you are up against in a major breaking news story

 

km

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