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"Cappuccino" is the correct spelling in both Italian and English (with 21,787 hits on Alamy). But I was just doing some research and test searches on various subjects and found images with 'cappucino' 2,128, 'cappacino' 140, 'cappaccino' 50.  (Mi dispiace, gli Italiani.) 

 

Do most of you deliberately add misspellings to your keywords?  :unsure:

Edited by Ed Rooney
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"Cappuccino" is the correct spelling in both Italian and English (with 21,787 hits on Alamy). But I was just doing some research and test searches on various subjects and found images with 'cappucino' 2,128, 'cappacino' 140, 'cappaccino' 50.  (Mi dispiace, gli Italiani.) 

 

Do most of you deliberately add misspellings to your keywords?  :unsure:

Depends on how much caffeine I've taken  ;)  :D

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I think it may be a brand thing....I've also noticed....

 

Hommus and Hummus

Yogurt and Yoghurt

 

Then you have the not so obvious like coriander and cilantro

 

...and yes, sometimes I mis-spell on purpose...and other times I accidentally misspell.  :)

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How about "graffiti," which has a number of creative misspellings -- e.g. graffitti, grafitti, grafity, graffitty, etc.

 

I sometimes put a couple of misspellings like these in my keywords. Thanks a latte for bringing this topic to out attention, Edo.

 
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"Cappuccino" is the correct spelling in both Italian and English (with 21,787 hits on Alamy). But I was just doing some research and test searches on various subjects and found images with 'cappucino' 2,128, 'cappacino' 140, 'cappaccino' 50.  (Mi dispiace, gli Italiani.) 

 

Do most of you deliberately add misspellings to your keywords?  :unsure:

 

Sometimes I add misspellings deliberately and sometimes not so deliberately! 

 

If its a common misspelling or an american spelling, I add those as well

Edited by York Photographer
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How about "graffiti," which has a number of creative misspellings -- e.g. graffitti, grafitti, grafity, graffitty, etc.

 

I sometimes put a couple of misspellings like these in my keywords. Thanks a latte for bringing this topic to out attention, Edo.

 

 

 

Do you use "graffito" for a single instance of informal wall art or vandalism (depending on your viewpoint and the quality of the work) - I always use both singular and plural in this case even if there are one or many.

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How about "graffiti," which has a number of creative misspellings -- e.g. graffitti, grafitti, grafity, graffitty, etc.

 

I sometimes put a couple of misspellings like these in my keywords. Thanks a latte for bringing this topic to out attention, Edo.

 

 

 

Do you use "graffito" for a single instance of informal wall art or vandalism (depending on your viewpoint and the quality of the work) - I always use both singular and plural in this case even if there are one or many.

 

 

No, I haven't been using the singular form "graffito" (Or is it "grafitto, or "graffitto" ?) because it could open up a whole new can of spaghetti sauce. Might be a good idea. However, a quick check of Alamy Measures suggests that "graffito" isn't used much by searchers. I do usually add both singulars and plurals, though.

Edited by John Mitchell
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How about "graffiti," which has a number of creative misspellings -- e.g. graffitti, grafitti, grafity, graffitty, etc.

 

I sometimes put a couple of misspellings like these in my keywords. Thanks a latte for bringing this topic to out attention, Edo.

 

 

 

Do you use "graffito" for a single instance of informal wall art or vandalism (depending on your viewpoint and the quality of the work) - I always use both singular and plural in this case even if there are one or many.

 

 

No, I haven't been using the singular form "graffito" (Or is it "grafitto, or "graffitto" ?) because it could open up a whole new can of spaghetti sauce. Might be a good idea. However, a quick check of Alamy Measures suggests that "graffito" isn't used much by searchers. I do usually add both singulars and plurals, though.

 

 

Tis a bit like "sheep" and "sheeps" methinks. When I think of it I add alternative spellings such as American/English and occasionally misspellings.

 

Reminds me of the secretary who was called Miss Pelling. She was always getting the sack.

 

Allan

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"Cappuccino" is the correct spelling in both Italian and English (with 21,787 hits on Alamy). But I was just doing some research and test searches on various subjects and found images with 'cappucino' 2,128, 'cappacino' 140, 'cappaccino' 50.  (Mi dispiace, gli Italiani.) 

 

Do most of you deliberately add misspellings to your keywords?  :unsure:

 

Sometimes I add misspellings deliberately and sometimes not so deliberately! 

 

If its a common misspelling or an american spelling, I add those as well

 

 

. . . "or an american spelling" . . . surely a redundancy in your otherwise flawless  sentence (apostrophe's absence notwithstanding)?

 

;)

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo
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Ahhhh...yes.

 

and this morning I discovered an alternate spelling for kefir.  Apparently it's synonymous with milk, and yogurt, and even plum pie.

 

Kefir and milk are different things

Kefir and yogurt are different things

Kefir and plum pie aren't even in the same food group.

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Yes I add the misspelling when I notice them.

Westminister 1,121

Westminster 85,723

 

I keyworded some of mine 'Westmonster' once - I think it was Freudian. (still brings up 5 results though)

 

 

:lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:  :lol:   Like it.

 

Allan

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I believe that the name of the game is to get your images picked by buyers. If they misspell or use a variation appropriate to their language then if I include it I may stand a chance. I have noticed a number of such situations and always add the different spelling when I see it. This is over and above the usual UK vs  US variants such as favour & favor. 

 

dov

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I believe that the name of the game is to get your images picked by buyers. If they misspell or use a variation appropriate to their language then if I include it I may stand a chance. I have noticed a number of such situations and always add the different spelling when I see it. This is over and above the usual UK vs  US variants such as favour & favor. 

 

dov

 

That's something I have been grappling with recently. I put up a picture of a Japanese volcano - Asamayama. The problem is that it is originally written in Kanji (Chinese characters). In English it can be written as:

Asama Yama

Asamayama [probably closest to the original]

Asamasan [common misreading of the Kanji]

Asama San

Mount Asama [what it really means]

 

along with

 

Kazan

Volcano

Fire Mountain [literal translation of Kazan]

 

I could go on to Shiraitonotaki (a waterfall), but I'll save you the pain!

 

On the English and American front, it really would be sensible to have the search engine handle the translation... or does it already Alamy?

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That's a very good point about foreign alphabets and scripts. Place and people names are often transliterated very differently in different languages, because their vowels and consonants work differently. 

 

eg Tchaikovsky, Tschaikowski (German) Cajkovskij (Czech) all pronounced the same, Moscow, Moskau (Ger); Tashkent / Taschkent etc. A German picture buyer searching in English, even one with an excellent command of the language, could well use the 'German' spelling.

Edited by Phil Robinson
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That's a very good point about foreign alphabets and scripts. Place and people names are often transliterated very differently in different languages, because their vowels and consonants work differently. 

 

eg Tchaikovsky, Tschaikowski (German) Cajkovskij (Czech) all pronounced the same, Moscow, Moskau (Ger); Tashkent / Taschkent etc. A German picture buyer searching in English, even one with an excellent command of the language, could well use the 'German' spelling.

 

Which means we do not want a unified Alamy spelling. Unless we teach all clients to use it.

Teaching clients however has not been very successful here.

 

wim

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