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Dyn Llun

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About Dyn Llun

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    Forum regular

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  • Website URL
    http://www.pete-davis-photography.com

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Wild Wales

Alamy

  • Alamy URL
    https://www.alamy.com/contrib-browse.asp?cid={E555D374-0D48-4532-B7DA-6FAA4A6DF2A6}&name=Pete+Davis
  • Images
    1261
  • Joined Alamy
    14 Jun 2012

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. I was on a long photographic trip in Northumberland some years ago and was shopping for veg to take back to the place we had rented for the duration. A very nice guy who worked in the shop came up to me and asked me if I wanted anything weird. I couldn't imagine what veg would come under that category until i realised he had said weighed in a Geordie accent. Pete
  2. Your ear will get attuned in time. I have a cottage in far northwest Wales and the accent there - like the Welsh language, is as different from here (mid west) and S. Wales as you can imagine. You get an 'ear' for it. Many people argue that Pembrokeshire isn't Wales at all. I'm saying nothing as I have several long-time friends who live there! Pete Davis
  3. How would you manage in a S.Wales veg market if you heard someone asking for gibbons?!
  4. MDM said that Leicas are "overpriced toys for old boys with more money than sense" I'm sorry but I find that grossly offensive. I, along with many others throughout the long time period they have been around, have been using that particular type of camera as an everyday working tool since I was 15 and still am. If others have other preferences that suit their workflow, that's great. But please don't spit out grotesquely offensive remarks because you may have another opinion.
  5. Chuck, The M10P body is probably my next purchase. I already have good lenses so just need the body. I have a couple of exhibitions coming up, delayed because of the pandemic and three books waiting to be launched at the same time, so with a handful of print sales plus some books I'll bag one. Or of course, 2,000 sales here for so-called 'personal use'. (Assuming 50% commission, more sales if you only get 40%). Of course half of those will be refunded so probably around 3,000 + sales to buy one! I loved the RX8. V smooth engine as you would expect from a rotary. C of G very low and central and when combined with DSC meant that you could not lose it on corners and we have many corners on rural Welsh roads. Surprisingly practical for me too. I could pack my big 10" x 8" camera Pelican case into the boot. (trunk) plus (very) big Gitzo tripod and a couple of Billingham's with Leica stuff and 10" x 8" film holders etc. Pete
  6. Chuck: I think there is software called Vue Scan which is supposed to work on all scanners with Mac or Windows. I think I used a free download of that years ago for a scanner I acquired from somewhere. Now I use the specific software for the large format scanner I have. However, Vue Scan is still around. If that's what you meant. Talking about engines. I reluctantly got rid of my Mazda RX8 last year which has a unique engine. It was still working fine but a few other parts were failing and they were horrendously expensive. (As was filling it up frequently (25 mpg) and road tax, servicing etc.). Plus not many roads in the UK where you dare give it a real blast. Top speed about 150. I got it to 120 once on a quiet stretch. (Don't tell anyone).
  7. Had to learn to use a screw mount Leica on my first day of work at - only just - 15. (1962) Bought my own a few years later (which I still have) and now also have a few M models and they are well used for my 'personal' - non project work and the digi M I use for the stuff that needs to be digi. It's great that I can use all my older lenses even on the newest digi M's - even screw lenses with a simple adaptor and they are still superb. I tend to use 35mm and 50 most, all Summicrons. Analogue M bodies also increase in value even more than rare single malt whisky! A good pension fund - except I'm never going to retire! Pete Davis
  8. Chuck said: "I do really miss the days of a couple of Leica M's" . I don't miss a couple of Leica M's because I still use them!. Film and digital. Pete Davis
  9. I have never been keen on the term 'street photography', not the photography that is made just the term. I prefer to say 'urban documentary' but I'm not too fussed about it to argue or debate. I was on a bus in NYC some years ago and saw saw Bruce Gilden stalking the streets outside with his Leica and flashgun. I have heard him speak a few times and he is brusque and direct and doesn't suffer fools. Especially when they ask dumb questions. We all have our 'lines in the sand' when it comes to liking folk. However, I do like him, his attitude and his work. Urban documentary has always been part of my ongoing work (not Alamy type work) and there are some here: https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/city-stories here: https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/home-and-away and here - new book: https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/innocence-of-eye Alamy told me off for posting my links here but I notice that others post links to their blog so I hope I may be excused for just posting these to just to join in and add to the discussion. Pete Davis
  10. Lockdown has, of course, been a depressing pain for everyone but for those of us who need to get about for our self-employed work, more difficult. While, in theory, I could have been out and about a bit in the landscape, the five mile restriction in Wales has only just been lifted. I live in a very rural area so meeting folks on my excursions into the wider landscape for the bulk of my non-library and non-urban photography is quite rare. However, I have been a good boyo and kept strictly to the Welsh guidelines until they were relaxed on Monday. In the meantime I have used the enforced studio time wisely by producing three books. The top three on this page: https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/newpage Apart from 'Silentium' which contains some new work made during the lockdown period in the studio, the other two are of existing work. I spent the time editing and sequencing and putting these together. They will be launched when my postponed one-person exhibition opens finally in August. It was originally planned to open in May. That was a disappointment of course but I have compensated with these books. For someone who is as photographically and physically active as me it's been hard but these projects have sustained me and given me a fillip. 'Silentium II' is in progress too. I can't wait to get out there again and pick up projects that have been on hold. I use my work to help get me out of the blues even though it's hard at the time. Producing new work is good. Pete Davis
  11. My parents were not great readers but they encouraged me which was great. They didn't have much money when I was a kid but they bought me those cheap hardback 'classics' with gaudy illustrations on the dust jackets. If I persevered with them I'd get an 'Airfix' plane kit as a treat every few weeks. They got them, books and kits, from Woolworth's in Splott, Cardiff when they went to the shops and our butcher's which was opposite. I still have them now. 'Black Beauty', 'Moby Dick', 'Treasure Island', 'Ivanhoe' and many others. It sparked a love of reading and was a huge help to me educationally. I have read a lot on that list, plus I was in to Dostoevsky in my late teens. Precocious? Moi? 😇 😀 On a photographic note I have just had delivered the big fat Joel Meyerowitz book 'Where I find Myself'. It spans his whole career to date. I have many of his monographs but good to have this chronological overview in one volume. Pete Davis https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/ http://peteslandscape.blogspot.com/ https://www.instagram.com/petedavisphoto/
  12. We have rabbits that eat everything. The joys of country living. Whole rows of young runner bean and other young, tender plants will all disappear overnight. The squirrels used to eat all the strawberries until I fashioned some removable chicken wire clad wooden frames to make a temporary cage just for the fruiting season. The strawberry bed is 6 metres by 2 so we have plenty of fruit. The raspberry bed is same size and we will have many pounds of those later on but they seem less prone to attack. The birds have a few, but not too many. At the moment I'm picking asparagus almost every day. Short season but a perennial so worth the effort and the wait in the beginning years. Globe artichokes will follow later as will tomatoes in the greenhouse and (Carolina Reaper - v hot) chillies in the conservatory. Plus salad stuff and Maris Piper spuds will crop in their time. Pete Davis https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/ http://peteslandscape.blogspot.com/ https://www.instagram.com/petedavisphoto/
  13. Chuck said "I do believe that there will always be a demand for historically important images." He's absolutely right of course in terms of what we are defining as traditional 'stock' a la Alamy, 'G' etc. and what I did as a reasonably large part of my 'commercial' work back in the 80's with another well-known picture library. It provided a chunk of my income. Not huge, but important. I'm fortunate that, for many years, I made what I term 'personal' work alongside of my 'commercial' photographic life and being quite successful in exhibiting this stuff worldwide. In many ways, I did the 'commercial' stuff to subsidise my real interest in photography which has always been the images and bodies of work that I made primarily for myself. I have been selling original prints of this work both privately and through galleries for over forty years and sales - and prices, have increased. Because I have been around and doing this for a long time and having gained a bit of a reputation, my prints are well regarded by collectors. My older work still sells but I am constantly embarking on new projects and making new work and these are in demand too. This means that I am relatively unaffected by the falloff in commissions and stock licence fees. Of course for this strategy to work for an individual photographer a few things are needed. A history of making work that might be considered relevant but outside of traditional 'stock' or 'commercial' photography. Also having your work exhibited widely in significant galleries and the accumulation of some sort of a reputation among print collectors for this work. The ability to make fine prints, in my case archival silver / gelatin B&W prints and for some of my work, platinum prints. For many years, my concentrating on this work probably meant that my income from what we might call traditional commissioned 'commercial' work was less as I ploughed income from that into partly subsidising my 'personal' projects. I am reaping the benefits now as we see less commissioned work and the decline in fees for stock. I feel for those many photographers for whom stock has been a major part of their income and investment in time and I am not going to try and predict what the future may see. However, I can't see it returning to its heydays. In addition to what Chuck noted, there is also always going to be an interest in the purchase of fine original prints of significant work. Admittedly, this is a smaller, very different and specialist market but open to those who are prepared to widen their photographic horizons and make, what is a considerable commitment to it. I understand that this is not for everyone and the commitment necessary is considerable. However, It's paid off for me in the longer term so it might for others in the future too. I only offer this as a suggestion that might interest a few here. In the meantime, do keep safe. Pete Davis https://www.pete-davis-photography.com/ http://peteslandscape.blogspot.com/ https://www.instagram.com/petedavisphoto/
  14. Still using Ilford HP5 for almost everything. 35mm in my film Leicas, 120 in my Rollei and 10" x 8" with my, well, 10" x 8" camera. Sales of my silver / gelatin and platinum prints are v healthy and preferred by discerning print collectors to inkjet. (They also sell for much more). I sell both prints from my 'archive' of older work and new work being made currently. Keeping me busy in these strange times. I can escape into the darkroom for periods and pretend, for a while at least, that what's happening outside, isn't. I suppose it's also the ultimate in self-isolation. Although I have my beer to keep me company. Not too much or I won't be able to focus the enlarger. Pete Davis https://www.pete-davis-photography.com http://peteslandscape.blogspot.com/ https://www.instagram.com/petedavisphoto/
  15. I think I'll pass on that one although I could bring my own asparagus knife. They will have the same problem come strawberry time too. By then I will be bending and picking my own from the bed which is next to my asparagus bed. Hopefully the lockdown will be over before the raspberries later so the pickers can come over. I will be too busy picking my own again then.
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