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Ed Rooney

A Couple of Tips

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Just thought I would share two things I learned along the way as a travel photographer and a general stock contributor. 

 

The first tip I got from an airline client of mine: "We prefer to use images that show sunshine and blue skies instead of those lovely twilight/night shots . . . because we want to send a subliminal message that the weather will be fair at this location." 

 

The second tip I got from the head of a stock agency: "Always watch TV commercials and take notes. The situations and the approaches you see can be useful when you're looking for stock photo images." 

 

If you are already aware of these things, great . . . some of you may not be.  :ph34r:

 

Edo

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Just thought I would share two things I learned along the way as a travel photographer and a general stock contributor. 

 

The first tip I got from an airline client of mine: "We prefer to use images that show sunshine and blue skies instead of those lovely twilight/night shots . . . because we want to send a subliminal message that the weather will be fair at this location." 

 

The second tip I got from the head of a stock agency: "Always watch TV commercials and take notes. The situations and the approaches you see can be useful when you're looking for stock photo images." 

 

If you are already aware of these things, great . . . some of you may not be.  :ph34r:

 

Edo

 

Great tips, thanks for sharing.

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Always include the city, state, and country, location information. Even if it is a simple flower shot. A Dayton, Ohio, USA, tourism magazine does not want to use a shot from a competing Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, market. Ohio magazine generally wants all images to be shot in Ohio. Buyers which are not location sensitive will not likely be searching by location.

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Those clear blue sky's are easier for a client to add text inside the pic. Nice puffy clouds can make a good landscape scene but are less workable for text.

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Always include the city, state, and country, location information.

Surely not if the location is irrelevant? I can think of images which would appear in a lot of irrelevant searches by location.

BTW this is an international forum, Alamy is a British company and we don't have "states" here. Nor do many countries.

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State or County or Provence, let's not split hairs! But yes, the better the location is identified, the better. Many clients won't care a toss, but for some it can save embarrassment and subsequent criticism. My Suffolk Tourist Board would feel they had egg on their face is they used a shot of the Essex side of the Stour Valley for instance. There are many shots on Alamy from visiting/wandering photographers who have got that kind of detail wrong.

 

Easily done of course!

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Always include the city, state, and country, location information.

Surely not if the location is irrelevant? I can think of images which would appear in a lot of irrelevant searches by location.

BTW this is an international forum, Alamy is a British company and we don't have "states" here. Nor do many countries.

 

 

 

Clients often put geographical limitations on a publication. A publication entitled “Birds of Alberta” would have to have all bird pictures taken in Alberta, even if it was a common bird like the Canada Goose. There is always the terror that someone with a twitter account will identify background vegetation that only grows in Nova Scotia.

 
I do not understand your BTW comments. Whats your point? Sounds Provincial to me.
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Just thought I would share two things I learned along the way as a travel photographer and a general stock contributor. 

 

The first tip I got from an airline client of mine: "We prefer to use images that show sunshine and blue skies instead of those lovely twilight/night shots . . . because we want to send a subliminal message that the weather will be fair at this location." 

 

The second tip I got from the head of a stock agency: "Always watch TV commercials and take notes. The situations and the approaches you see can be useful when you're looking for stock photo images." 

 

If you are already aware of these things, great . . . some of you may not be.  :ph34r:

 

Edo

Interesting tips! Thanks a lot for sharing Ed   :)

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Yes, absolutely no dull skies.

 

However, twilight shots do sell.

 

Btw, I just sold a really dull shot of Oxford Street to illustrate air pollution.

Edited by vpics
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The picture that has sold the most times for me on Alamy, the first I sold throuigh Alamyu, has a dark grey sky - a fierce storm was iminent. So blue skies essential?, my blue sky pictures seem to sell more rarely than almost everything else :)

 

Perhaps I don't have the right eye.

Edited by Martin P Wilson
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Thanks.. sounds logical.  Shame it's been grey and dull most of the time here in the East of the UK for the last 4 months!

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Always include the city, state, and country, location information.

Surely not if the location is irrelevant? I can think of images which would appear in a lot of irrelevant searches by location.

BTW this is an international forum, Alamy is a British company and we don't have "states" here. Nor do many countries.

 

 

 

Clients often put geographical limitations on a publication. A publication entitled “Birds of Alberta” would have to have all bird pictures taken in Alberta, even if it was a common bird like the Canada Goose. There is always the terror that someone with a twitter account will identify background vegetation that only grows in Nova Scotia.

 
I do not understand your BTW comments. Whats your point? Sounds Provincial to me.

 

Is it essential to have a twitter account to take pictures of these birds?

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I do not understand your BTW comments. Whats your point? Sounds Provincial to me.

 

I'm sometimes moved to point out that the US is not the world.

Edited by spacecadet
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Have a look at this AoA result:

 

growth           64
technology       42
success          38
change           32
social media     32
building blocks  32
innovation       32
teamwork         30
support          29
future           27
insurance        26
leadership       25
concepts         25
education        25
diversity        25
transformation   24
network          23
strategy         22
choices          21
working together 21
partnership      21
business         20
knowledge        20
communication    20
happiness        19
connection       19
finance          19
trust            19
risk             18
protection       17
divorce          17
together         17
evolution        16
concept          16
vision           16
memory           16
relationship     16
time             16
confidence       15
opportunity      15
competition      14
journey          14
collaboration    14
excellence       14
improvement      14
marketing        14
cloud computing  14
progress         14
aging            13
motivation       13
strength         12
sunrise          12
helping hands    12
advertising      12
savings          11
time travel      11
uk map           11
freedom          11
decision making  11
internet         11
rich and poor    11
world map        11
pension          10
maze             10
value            10
marriage         10
chess            10
listening        10
perspective      10
flexibility      10
business growth  10
saving money     10
creative         10

 

horror           5    
hungry           5    
failure          5
global warming   4
poverty          4
drugs            3    
economic crisis  2
gender gap       2    
bad mood         2
sinking ship     2

 

 

This is from an actual AoA search. Total items found: 3800. It's clear that I have left stuff out, it's all completely true nonetheless. I did not leave out negative keywords from the first part.

I don't think I have to spell it out, but negativity is a niche subject on Alamy.

 

wim

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Although the majority of my travel sales have blue skies, about one-third of them have been taken at sunrise, sunset, or during the blue hour. A tiny handful also have dull skies. Those fine weather shots are certainly what we all aim for but sometimes the weather doesn't cooperate. 

 

My first sale ever on Alamy was of barbed wire with a cloudy gray sky behind. It's sold a few times. 

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Blue sky in Scotland!! About as common as a blue moon. ;)

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For clarity, let me make the point that these are not my tips, nor my ideas. That's why I used quotation marks (even if the quotes are not exact). 

 

When the airline dude made the comment on "blue skies," he was looking at some of my dusk/night shots that I had just delivered to him . . . and he liked them, and said so. On trips, every evening that I could, I would setup somewhere and do one of those key images. (We can only do one setup a night.) We used to call them "Slick," a noun rather than an adjective. Everybody likes those images, right? I know I do. 

 

The stock agency guy's suggesting that I watch TV commercials? That sounds logical, no? Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) I've not owned a TV for about 10 years now. 

 

dusk-settles-on-the-tiber-river-in-rome- the-empire-state-building-as-seen-from-m washington-state-department-of-transport

Edited by Ed Rooney

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You ought to give TV another try Ed - the picture's in colour now   ;)

 

Great thread btw :)

Edited by John Walker
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You ought to give TV another try Ed - the picture's in colour now   ;)

 

Great thread btw :)

 

 

Color? Come on!  Pull the other one; it's got bells on it.  :wacko:

 

I do watch TV shows on my iMac. I have two streaming services: Netflix and Hulu, and most of the Networks let me stream shows a day after they have them on television. 

 

And thanks -- I can't believe I have 19 Green Flags. It seems like just a few weeks ago that people were getting ready to stone me to death. 

 

Edo

Edited by Ed Rooney
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"Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) I've not owned a TV for about 10 years now. "

 

You haven't missed a thing, unless you are into programs like "Swamp People".

 

Nice tips, and thanks for sharing. Another reason is blue skies psychologically imply positive feelings, whereas overcast is associated with more of a gloomy state of mind.

 

Been in kind of photo slump myself lately, so I find the tips, and your nice shots inspiring! They all took some real effort, plus you waited for the little details (the ferry, or the group of individuals conversing by the light) to arrive in the scenes that compositionally add so much more to an image.

 

​I was once told including water in a scene can be good boon for appeal as well.

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Another "no blue skies" of course, is storm clouds, other weather like rain, snow, etc.

But like Ed said, if you want to sell to travel guides, those dogs won't hunt.

 

I noticed when I called the resort owner before my first trip to St. Croix, he acted reluctant to talk about rainy days, and give me much of an idea of what to expect other than high/lows.

Edited by Betty LaRue

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Seems reasonable to assume that blue skies will be required to sell holiday brochures, but grey skies are sometimes preferred to illustrate newspaper stories. An editor might pick an image that mirrors the current weather for example, or the seriousness of the situation. I went out to shoot a local landmark building on a sunny day and uploaded a couple of shots. One has made a few pennies, but the last view I had saw the only zoom go to the only competing image, that was shot in the gloom!

 

The current rate of remuneration for travel brochure ready pics far exceeds that for any newspaper sales that I have made. Horses and courses.

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Thank you for the kind words, MM.

 

Since Manhattan is an island, I'm surrounded by water . . . not so many palm trees as on St. Croix, though.  B)  

 

Now that I'm shooting for general stock, the blueness of the sky, the fairness of the day, are not so important . . . but habits die hard.

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