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Betty LaRue

Post a beautiful nature picture

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I’m a bit late to the party with this but here’s a hoverfly from last summer 

W11H7J.jpg

 

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10 hours ago, Sally R said:

 

Thanks, that's a brilliant video 😀 😂 Love the music/dance combo. Yes I had seen it before on a nature documentary. It's quite amazing the complex world of small creatures that most of the time we don't see. They are pretty groovy dancers too!

 

What did I say? No further new species to be discovered? That's what Jurgen Otto said months ago. And today, this. 5 out of 7 new species are your way in WA.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-02/seven-new-species-of-peacock-spider-discovered/12110306

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4 hours ago, gvallee said:

What did I say? No further new species to be discovered? That's what Jurgen Otto said months ago. And today, this. 5 out of 7 new species are your way in WA.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-02/seven-new-species-of-peacock-spider-discovered/12110306

 

Wow, there's more! Nature comes up with the most artistic designs. Thanks for the link. I hope you are finding some nice little creatures to see and photograph in central Australia.

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11 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

It is called a "Gaper".

 

At least when I was a lot younger and a breeder of budgerigars the young with the wide mouth were called gapers.

 

Allan

 

Thanks Allan. I hadn't heard of gapers before. When really small in the nest, baby birds do seem to be mostly a mouth attached to a body. Must be nature's way of ensuring they get fed! That would have been lovely raising baby budgerigars. 

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7 hours ago, Sally R said:

 

Thanks Allan. I hadn't heard of gapers before. When really small in the nest, baby birds do seem to be mostly a mouth attached to a body. Must be nature's way of ensuring they get fed! That would have been lovely raising baby budgerigars. 

 

Rewarding but a lot of work. Every chick had to be checked each day for food stuck to their little beaks as it would harden and their beaks would become deformed.

Adults are messy feeders of their young.

Can't remember exactly how many nest boxes we had going at any one time but we were only a small concern with around 20 and usually an average of three young per nest. Breeding was year round too.

Added to that there was the regular daily cleaning of the nest boxes and cages as well as the aviary and outdoor flights.

Then topping up feeding containers and water bottles.

 

But the birds are great fun and we had a good time watching their antics. In the winter when snow was on the ground we would open the doors to the outside flights and the birds would roll in the snow on the bottom of the flights.

 

Allan

 

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Posted (edited)
My last bird picture, I think.
Ardea cinerea (on top), vulpes vulpes, brenta canadensis.
Oh, and a few anas platyrhynchos in the pond.
 
a-grey-heron-on-top-of-carshalton-war-memorial-by-eh-bouchier-1921-H6MA5B.jpg
Edited by spacecadet
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17 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Rewarding but a lot of work. Every chick had to be checked each day for food stuck to their little beaks as it would harden and their beaks would become deformed.

Adults are messy feeders of their young.

Can't remember exactly how many nest boxes we had going at any one time but we were only a small concern with around 20 and usually an average of three young per nest. Breeding was year round too.

Added to that there was the regular daily cleaning of the nest boxes and cages as well as the aviary and outdoor flights.

Then topping up feeding containers and water bottles.

 

But the birds are great fun and we had a good time watching their antics. In the winter when snow was on the ground we would open the doors to the outside flights and the birds would roll in the snow on the bottom of the flights.

 

Allan

 

 

You might enjoy the videos and photos by this photographer.... https://www.leilajeffreys.com/video-art  I saw this exhibit here and loved it.

https://www.olsengruin.com/artworks.php?artist_id=422 The videos are hypnotic.

 

Paulette

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25 minutes ago, NYCat said:

 

You might enjoy the videos and photos by this photographer.... https://www.leilajeffreys.com/video-art  I saw this exhibit here and loved it.

https://www.olsengruin.com/artworks.php?artist_id=422 The videos are hypnotic.

 

Paulette

That white budgie sitting there enjoying the air from (presumably) a hair dryer- hilarious.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

You might enjoy the videos and photos by this photographer.... https://www.leilajeffreys.com/video-art  I saw this exhibit here and loved it.

https://www.olsengruin.com/artworks.php?artist_id=422 The videos are hypnotic.

 

Paulette

 

Thank you Paulette. Brings back memories. I noted that there are quite a few all white budgies in the clips but did note see an albino which have pink eyes.

 

There were a lot of colours and combinations of colours around then but no pink budgies. There was a push on to be the first breeder to try to beed a pink budgie and we joined in the race.

The nearest we got was an Albino with a very slight tinge of pink in its' feathers when the light shone on it in a certain way. Unfortunately as it grew older the pink tinge disappeared.

As far as I know no one has bred a pink budgie but I have not kept up with the news on that front since I finished breeding them when I left home to go to another job in another part of the country.

 

Allan

 

Just come back from googling "Pink Budgerigar".  Seems to be a few pink budgies on there but I am not convinced they are real.

 

ITMA

 

 

Edited by Allan Bell

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Posted (edited)

Some lovely images around showing animals slowly (in some cases rapidly) adapting to the lack of people on the streets--the wild goats in the little unpronounceable Welsh village are a delight.

Never one to ignore a trend, here's my take on this phenomenom, taken in downtown New York . . .

 

trexnyc.jpg

 

She'd actually come into town to see the movie you can see advertised on the building in the background . . .

 

DD

 

Edited by dustydingo
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20 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Just come back from googling "Pink Budgerigar".  Seems to be a few pink budgies on there but I am not convinced they are real.

 

 

Allan, if you search for "pink budgies" you'll find several forum entries of budgie breeders. The consensus on those forums is that budgies cannot produce red or any variations thereof, it simply is impossible genetically. So your scepticism is warranted and correct it seems.

 

DD

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4 minutes ago, dustydingo said:

 

Allan, if you search for "pink budgies" you'll find several forum entries of budgie breeders. The consensus on those forums is that budgies cannot produce red or any variations thereof, it simply is impossible genetically. So your scepticism is warranted and correct it seems.

 

DD

 

Thanks for the information DD.

 

Allan

 

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On 01/04/2020 at 09:51, dustydingo said:

 

Bewdiful. He seems to be stuck working out the best approach?

 

DD

Yes, a moment later he plucked out a sunflower seed. I think the moment I snapped the image, he was just securing himself enough to not land on his back in the grass. 😊

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On 01/04/2020 at 05:08, gvallee said:

Proboscis monkeys, Borneo

 

M024PX.jpg

A bit of Jimmy Durante in her family tree?

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On 01/04/2020 at 10:43, spacecadet said:

These geese are fattened up for Christmas in a favourite Flemish town of ours. It has elaborate 17th- century fortifications, including moats, and they alternate between the grass and the water. When they wish to cross the road, the traffic waits, of course.

 

a-flock-of-domestic-and-toulouse-geese-crossing-the-road-and-stopping-H3EB5W.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
a-flock-of-domestic-and-toulouse-geese-crossing-the-road-and-stopping-H3EB5Y.jpg

I really like it when I see people stopping their busy lives for animals. I recently watched a video showing a cop halting traffic to allow a duck and about 10-12 ducklings to cross. Then he walked them down the sidewalk and around a fence, herding them to a lake. 

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12 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Rewarding but a lot of work. Every chick had to be checked each day for food stuck to their little beaks as it would harden and their beaks would become deformed.

Adults are messy feeders of their young.

Can't remember exactly how many nest boxes we had going at any one time but we were only a small concern with around 20 and usually an average of three young per nest. Breeding was year round too.

Added to that there was the regular daily cleaning of the nest boxes and cages as well as the aviary and outdoor flights.

Then topping up feeding containers and water bottles.

 

But the birds are great fun and we had a good time watching their antics. In the winter when snow was on the ground we would open the doors to the outside flights and the birds would roll in the snow on the bottom of the flights.

 

Allan

 

Allan! I’m surprised the budgies survived snow!
We had parakeets for a big part of my life. Their constitutions were delicate. One time we left to go to a drive-in movie in south Texas where winters were mild. The door on our apartment was out of plumb and hard to shut securely. While we were gone, a cold front came through and blew the door open. The bird cage sat clear across the room but was in the cold draft. It was already fluffed up, like they do when sick, by the time we got home.  It died the next day.

The reason I finally wanted a parrot is because I got tired of mourning our precious parakeets. The longest we had one was 8 years, the shortest was 4 months. I took great care of them and they had everything recommended a budgie should have. I kept the cage spotless.  
 

Each was tamed by me within a couple of days of bringing it home, and rode around on our shoulders and had lots of out-of the-cage playtime. I taught them to talk. One said Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. They all learned “pretty bird” and “give me a kiss”.  Each one was part of the family, and the whole family cried when one died. They would be healthy and active one day, get sick and die quickly.

The veterinarians were not schooled in how to take care of birds.

Parrots have stronger constitutions. I’ve had Echo 27 years.

A funny thing. My mother took out a small life insurance policy on me as a child. I kept up the premiums after marrying. One day a new agent, a young lady, came to collect on the policy. This was back before God made dirt when agents actually called on people.

 

I invited her in and as she walked across the room to sit down, Scrapper flew in from his cage in the next room and tried to greet her by landing on her head. She was taken so unaware that she screamed bloody murder and flattened on the floor like a soldier diving into a foxhole!  🤣😄😂.

I was so embarrassed. Even so, after she left I laughed until I cried.

Betty

 

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On 01/04/2020 at 07:54, dustydingo said:

Well, it's not just Australia that has cranky birds . . . here's "proof" that a giant cockatoo, that just happens to live in a zoo in Bali, harassed a couple of women from Australia who were walking through a well-known Florida USA holiday resort . . . oh, and I have a lovely arched bridge over in Sydney I can sell you for a song . . . 

attack.jpg

DD

😂

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Posted (edited)

Overlooking the Plateau d'Emparis near Besse en Oisans with La Meije mountain in the background.

Just a few miles away from the Lake Lérié picture I posted on this topic a few days ago.

I really love this place. I tend to go there once a year.

 

overlooking-the-plateau-demparis-near-be

Edited by Olivier Parent
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35 minutes ago, Olivier Parent said:

Overlooking the Plateau d'Emparis near Besse en Oisans with La Meije mountain in the background.

Just a few miles away from the Lake Lérié picture I posted on this topic a few days ago.

I really love this place. I tend to go there once a year.

 

overlooking-the-plateau-demparis-near-be

 

You're a man of reefs and mountains Olivier.

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Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

You're a man of reefs and mountains Olivier.

 

For the time being, I feel I am mostly a man of my own flat Gen… 😉

With the Covid-19 epidemic and the confinement procedures that apply, I haven't been outside for almost 3 weeks.

Fortunately, I still have enough beer and Green Charteuse supplies to withstand a siege. 😀

I hope everything goes better for you in Australia and that you can still take beautiful pictures in the wilderness.

Edited by Olivier Parent
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Posted (edited)
21 minutes ago, Olivier Parent said:

 

For the time being, I feel I am mostly a man of my own flat Gen… 😉

With the Covid-19 epidemic and the confinement procedures that apply, I haven't been outside for almost 3 weeks.

Fortunately, I still have enough beer and Green Charteuse supplies to withstand a siege. 😀

I hope everything goes better for you in Australia and that you can still take beautiful pictures in the wilderness.

 

A flat? Lucky you! Walking space in our motorhome is about 6m x 1m. We've been staying put for about 6 weeks now and by the look of it, it will be another 6 months. The good thing is that we are in a vast very sparsely populated State, Northern Territory, with only a handful of coronavirus cases (22), 19 of which in Darwin which is over thousand kms from us.

 

We also have a copious amount of white wine, we made sure of that. And Internet. I'm so glad I took my big screen on our travels, I can learn more and play with Photoshop. We had planned to isolate ourselves in a vast 1 million hectare homestead in the wilderness but they closed down roads and restricted travel. There are numerous remote aboriginal communities around which have to be protected from the devastating virus if they ever get it.

 

As for taking pictures, I'm limited to walking around the near empty campsite where I found countless beautiful bugs which brought me back to macro photography. I keep switching between macro and bird photography. When I lose patience with one, I switch to the other.

 

Patience is the order of the day. It could be a lot lot worse. At least so far, we're healthy.

Edited by gvallee
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9 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Allan! I’m surprised the budgies survived snow!
We had parakeets for a big part of my life. Their constitutions were delicate. One time we left to go to a drive-in movie in south Texas where winters were mild. The door on our apartment was out of plumb and hard to shut securely. While we were gone, a cold front came through and blew the door open. The bird cage sat clear across the room but was in the cold draft. It was already fluffed up, like they do when sick, by the time we got home.  It died the next day.

The reason I finally wanted a parrot is because I got tired of mourning our precious parakeets. The longest we had one was 8 years, the shortest was 4 months. I took great care of them and they had everything recommended a budgie should have. I kept the cage spotless.  
 

Each was tamed by me within a couple of days of bringing it home, and rode around on our shoulders and had lots of out-of the-cage playtime. I taught them to talk. One said Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. They all learned “pretty bird” and “give me a kiss”.  Each one was part of the family, and the whole family cried when one died. They would be healthy and active one day, get sick and die quickly.

The veterinarians were not schooled in how to take care of birds.

Parrots have stronger constitutions. I’ve had Echo 27 years.

A funny thing. My mother took out a small life insurance policy on me as a child. I kept up the premiums after marrying. One day a new agent, a young lady, came to collect on the policy. This was back before God made dirt when agents actually called on people.

 

I invited her in and as she walked across the room to sit down, Scrapper flew in from his cage in the next room and tried to greet her by landing on her head. She was taken so unaware that she screamed bloody murder and flattened on the floor like a soldier diving into a foxhole!  🤣😄😂.

I was so embarrassed. Even so, after she left I laughed until I cried.

Betty

 

 

😆😆

 

Budgies are hardy birds. In fact we have wild flocks of them in the UK. They have formed over the years where pets in cages have escaped and bred in the wild.

 

Allan

 

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7 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

A flat? Lucky you! Walking space in our motorhome is about 6m x 1m. We've been staying put for about 6 weeks now and by the look of it, it will be another 6 months. The good thing is that we are in a vast very sparsely populated State, Northern Territory, with only a handful of coronavirus cases (22), 19 of which in Darwin which is over thousand kms from us.

 

We also have a copious amount of white wine, we made sure of that. And Internet. I'm so glad I took my big screen on our travels, I can learn more and play with Photoshop. We had planned to isolate ourselves in a vast 1 million hectare homestead in the wilderness but they closed down roads and restricted travel. There are numerous remote aboriginal communities around which have to be protected from the devastating virus if they ever get it.

 

As for taking pictures, I'm limited to walking around the near empty campsite where I found countless beautiful bugs which brought me back to macro photography. I keep switching between macro and bird photography. When I lose patience with one, I switch to the other.

 

Patience is the order of the day. It could be a lot lot worse. At least so far, we're healthy.

 

Sorry to hear that!

I was somehow hoping that less populated areas could escape from it…

Macrophotography is one of my favorite activities, although I have not had the opportunity to practice for a very long time.

I wanted to catch up this spring… well, no luck at all obviously!

Have a good time with those amazing creatures (and the wine 😉).

I wish you the best.

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11 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

😆😆

 

Budgies are hardy birds. In fact we have wild flocks of them in the UK. They have formed over the years where pets in cages have escaped and bred in the wild.

 

Allan

 

There are also large flocks of Green Parrots in London now Alan, very noisy and gregarious birds. My friends Budgies love the hose put on mist sprayed over the Aviary, they roll around on the wet leaves.

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I was very surprised to see a large flock of what looked like small green parrots in central Paris last fall.

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