Jump to content

Post a beautiful nature picture


Recommended Posts

On 03/04/2020 at 23:47, Sally R said:

 

I love the idea of budgies rolling around in the snow. It's something they'd never get to do in their natural habitat here. Yes it must be quite a responsibility keeping the chicks alive and well.

 

In 2018 I visited Stewart Island in southern New Zealand. A giant, flightless parrot called a kakapo used to live there. They are extremely endangered and so they moved them to Codfish Island where there are no introduced predators. However, people claim to have heard their call on remote parts of Stewart Island. I hoped I might encounter one, knowing that it was highly unlikely. I thought you might like this video about the most famous kakapo named SIrocco with one of his carers. He thinks he's a human as he was raised by humans as a chick. He is now considered the official spokesbird for his species. They are so loveable and cute:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQn90slumUY

Ohhh, Sally! Thank you for this! It made me cry. What a darling 🦜 parrot, wish I could hold it. It has such tender eyes. 🥰

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:
On 04/04/2020 at 12:47, Sally R said:

 

I love the idea of budgies rolling around in the snow. It's something they'd never get to do in their natural habitat here. Yes it must be quite a responsibility keeping the chicks alive and well.

 

In 2018 I visited Stewart Island in southern New Zealand. A giant, flightless parrot called a kakapo used to live there. They are extremely endangered and so they moved them to Codfish Island where there are no introduced predators. However, people claim to have heard their call on remote parts of Stewart Island. I hoped I might encounter one, knowing that it was highly unlikely. I thought you might like this video about the most famous kakapo named SIrocco with one of his carers. He thinks he's a human as he was raised by humans as a chick. He is now considered the official spokesbird for his species. They are so loveable and cute:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQn90slumUY

Ohhh, Sally! Thank you for this! It made me cry. What a darling 🦜 parrot, wish I could hold it. It has such tender eyes. 🥰

 

Glad you enjoyed it Betty! Yes they are lovely. As Sirocco is so used to people and thinks of himself as a human, he has been taken around New Zealand to teach people about the endangered Kakapo. There seems to be a nice arrangement where he is with humans some of the time but also off in the wild some of the time. I really hoped he might have been doing one of his tours when I was there and I might get the chance to meet him. He is a bit of a rock star in New Zealand!

 

And yes they have the most beautiful eyes and face. If ever feeling a bit down I think one answer must be to look into the eyes of a Kakapo parrot! We don't have any parrots that big here in Australia, but this is one of the local species from here is Western Australia. They are called the Australian Ring-necked Parrot and probably most commonly here the Twenty-Eight Parrot, as one of their calls sounds like they are saying twenty eight:

 

australian-ringneck-parrot-barnardius-zonarius-subspecies-semitorquatus-also-known-as-the-twenty-eight-parrot-because-of-their-call-2A4W6DR.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's all from NZ alas.....

Lymington River SSSI, Hampshire

lymington-river-site-of-special-scientific-interest-sssi-lymington-hampshire-england-W1R74K.jpg
 
Straight into the sun with a kit zoom, I think the gods of optics were smiling on me.
Edited by spacecadet
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
5 hours ago, NYCat said:

How about a big bird...  

 

F3K90W.jpg

Cocoi Heron in the Pantanal, Brazil

 

Paulette

Good catch, both of you! That’s been one of my most fun things to do, trying to catch the herons around here, the Blue Heron, fishing.

I was never as talented at it as you, Paulette, I kept getting them without as much action.

 

AC1FMK.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

Good catch, both of you! That’s been one of my most fun things to do, trying to catch the herons around here, the Blue Heron, fishing.

I was never as talented at it as you, Paulette, I kept getting them without as much action.

 

AC1FMK.jpg

 

We were cheating. It was a photo tour and fish were being thrown to the heron. Oooops.... giving away secrets.

 

Paulette

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of yellow-bellied marmots in rural British Columbia (Okanagan area).   These were spotted on the road to a winery, near a sign that said "Marmot Crossing".  Two yellow-bellied marmots on a rock in the Okanagan area of British Columbia Canada. Marmota flaviventris Stock Photo

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot this a while back at a Key West, Florida butterfly conservatory and I thought it was a monarch but now I am pretty sure I am wrong....any ideas?

 

usa-florida-key-west-butterfly-nature-conservatory-A86AWY.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

Shot this a while back at a Key West, Florida butterfly conservatory and I thought it was a monarch but now I am pretty sure I am wrong....any ideas?

 

usa-florida-key-west-butterfly-nature-conservatory-A86AWY.jpg

Michael, I think this is the Paper kite butterfly, Idea leuconoe.  Check out the wiki link here:

It is a beautiful butterfly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idea_leuconoe

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Michael Ventura said:

Looks like good call Betty, thank you!

You are so welcome, Michael. I’ve shot enough butterflies and searched to ID them that it was no problem at all. Now you can keyword your butterfly.

Tip. Search Alamy first. I searched first page or two of “black and yellow butterfly” and got a few similars, but none were identified other than “black and yellow butterfly”.  Next I searched “white and black butterfly” and brought up some new ones. I found one that was properly identified, then went to the Internet to verify. Got the wiki site, and a few other links and confirmation. Many times on Alamy keywords include the colors. This butterfly is basically white and black, but it has a blush of yellow over the top of the wings. So always search colors as a starting point.

I doubt I spent over 10 minutes total.

Edited by Betty LaRue
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, gvallee said:

Great Egret displaying

 

AC7XKW.jpg

Oh, Gen, I’ve never shot one displaying! Green with envy.

Edited by Betty LaRue
Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Oh, Gen, I’ve never shot one displaying! Green with envy.

 

It was taken at St Augustine Alligator Farm in Florida. There is a colony of Egrets, Spoonbills and American Woodstorks, all nesting there in the bushes above the crocs. When I went, you could buy a photographer's pass and you were let in before the public, and could stay after closure time. It was a great atmosphere and fun amongst photographers. You would hear  'Innnncominggg!!!!' tac tac tac tac tac 10 frames per seconds from dozens of cameras. It was all good until the ranger forgot us in the evening after closure time and left us locked in with the crocs for a good while before realising. I have great memories of that solo trip. Wildlife photography can be a heap of fun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Always loved puffins. Last year I went back to Skomer Island off the coast of South Wales, where they congregate in (sadly decreasing) numbers.  This was one of my favourite shots.  Makes me long to go back.  Not long before they begin to return to nest, but who knows if we'll be allowed out? :(

 

Atlantic Puffin, Fratercula arctica, on Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire, Wales Stock Photo

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, losdemas said:

Always loved puffins. Last year I went back to Skomer Island off the coast of South Wales, where they congregate in (sadly decreasing) numbers.  This was one of my favourite shots.  Makes me long to go back.  Not long before they begin to return to nest, but who knows if we'll be allowed out? :(

 

Atlantic Puffin, Fratercula arctica, on Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire, Wales Stock Photo

Yes, Puffins were always on my bucket list. But the one and only chance I had was timed wrong, (nesting season) and the boats shut down. This one posed for you, I see!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

It was taken at St Augustine Alligator Farm in Florida. There is a colony of Egrets, Spoonbills and American Woodstorks, all nesting there in the bushes above the crocs. When I went, you could buy a photographer's pass and you were let in before the public, and could stay after closure time. It was a great atmosphere and fun amongst photographers. You would hear  'Innnncominggg!!!!' tac tac tac tac tac 10 frames per seconds from dozens of cameras. It was all good until the ranger forgot us in the evening after closure time and left us locked in with the crocs for a good while before realising. I have great memories of that solo trip. Wildlife photography can be a heap of fun.

Yes it is fun! I met a nice lady here on the forum years ago. I lived in Oklahoma City, she lived in Houston, Texas. She invited me down, and had a whole birding tour planned out along the Gulf of Mexico. Most places were in Texas, but we traveled to Louisiana also. We were on a charter off of Texas to shoot whooping cranes, then on a boat in Louisiana that took us through the swamps. Most shooting, though were places and rookeries accessed by car, then on foot.

I loved every minute, even the time I obliviously stood on an ant hill, so excited to shoot my first spoonbills. Oblivious until I felt the ants crawling up my legs. They didn’t quite reach the edge of my shorts. Thank heavens. There could have been a strip tease involved.

Louise had the pleasure of watching my gyrations while I held my camera and monopod as I beat off the ants. I’m sure it was funny from her safe observation point. Not so much mine.  Only in retrospect.  Actually, truth told, we had a good laugh.

For the life of me, I don’t understand how everything I do with other people gives them good, funny stories to tell their grandchildren.

Betty

Edited by Betty LaRue
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a bit of a story behind this little lady.

If you notice she is blind in her left eye.

I kept seeing her for a couple of weeks and even saw her hunt successfully once which I was amazed at due to her disability and that they rely so heavily on their acute vision.

Unfortunately I haven't seen her since but as we have regular nesting kestrels nearby maybe (hopefully) she found herself a new territory.

 

Juvenile Kestrel, Falco tinnunculus, blind in the left eye, perched on a branch against a blue sky. Taken at Stanpit Marsh UK Stock Photo

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Martin L said:

There is a bit of a story behind this little lady.

If you notice she is blind in her left eye.

I kept seeing her for a couple of weeks and even saw her hunt successfully once which I was amazed at due to her disability and that they rely so heavily on their acute vision.

Unfortunately I haven't seen her since but as we have regular nesting kestrels nearby maybe (hopefully) she found herself a new territory.

 

Juvenile Kestrel, Falco tinnunculus, blind in the left eye, perched on a branch against a blue sky. Taken at Stanpit Marsh UK Stock Photo

Aww, poor thing. She’s beautiful.
 

I once tamed a wild baby squirrel. He and his sister came to my yard after leaving the nest. She was very wild, he was very curious and interested in me. I spent days sitting on the grass tossing pecans to him, slowly bringing him closer. Finally, he took one from my hand, his tail going ‘round and ‘round, like a crank, with nervousness. I named him and he knew his name.

The time came when all I had to do was step out of my back door and loudly call his name, and he’d come running. By then, I was giving him shelled pecan halves he took from my fingers. I could tell when he was gathering himself on the fence to jump on my shoulder, but I was afraid and stepped back. I had witnessed a squirrel bite my friend when I was 9, and it was a bloody event.

 

Then, he didn’t show up for a few days when I called. Finally he came back with a very swollen front elbow. I think someone had shot him with a BB gun.

I found some antibiotic capsules I had. Took the powder out and coated the pecans with antibiotic and fed him.

It was working. Day after day, I saw the swelling/infection decrease.

He was gone again for a few days, but this time when he came back he was very sick. Unmedicated, the infection overtook him. I think that last visit was goodbye. He didn’t eat, but sat on the fence with dull eyes while I talked to him, then limped away on 3 legs.

Then he was gone...forever.

Betty

  • Sad 1
  • Upvote 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.