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Betty LaRue

Post a beautiful nature picture

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Posted (edited)

The Pipevine swallowtail, so pretty,  is found in these parts also. They are the hardest butterfly to photograph unless the light allows a really fast shutter speed. They flutter their wings really fast.

This is what they look like from the side. Taken in my garden.

KBC275.jpg

 

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Western Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis) really tiny 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch

 

a-western-pygmy-blue-brephidium-exile-butterfly-on-a-phacelia-plant-at-the-san-luis-national-wildlife-refuge-in-the-central-valley-of-california-usa-W97RNA.jpg

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Johnnie5 said:

Western Pygmy Blue (Brephidium exilis) really tiny 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch

 

a-western-pygmy-blue-brephidium-exile-butterfly-on-a-phacelia-plant-at-the-san-luis-national-wildlife-refuge-in-the-central-valley-of-california-usa-W97RNA.jpg

Johnnie, I’ll bet that’s about the size of a gray Hairstreak. They are very tiny like that, too. The soft edges on the wings of your butterfly is very pretty. Isn’t it amazing how you don’t really appreciate the beauty of something

So tiny until you see all the enlarged details on the computer? I’ve learned so much through the eye of a camera, too. Especially a macro lens.

2A5MKHC.jpg

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Black Skimmer (Rynchops nigra) doing what he knows best: skimming the water in search of fish.

It's not uncommon to see skimmers with a broken lower jaw. It happens when they hit a rock in the water.

 

EJ6KB2.jpg

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9 hours ago, gvallee said:

Black Skimmer (Rynchops nigra) doing what he knows best: skimming the water in search of fish.

It's not uncommon to see skimmers with a broken lower jaw. It happens when they hit a rock in the water.

 

EJ6KB2.jpg

 

They will be developing sonar in the next generation.

 

Allan

 

Lovely image and well caught.

 

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12 hours ago, gvallee said:

Black Skimmer (Rynchops nigra) doing what he knows best: skimming the water in search of fish.

It's not uncommon to see skimmers with a broken lower jaw. It happens when they hit a rock in the water.

 

EJ6KB2.jpg

+1 A lovely image, i once watched some fledglings "practicing" skimming charging up and down a shingle beach pushing pebbles, very entertaining like little snooker players pushing balls along.

Andy 

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I’m glad we don’t have skimmers here. I’m such a dipwit that the first broken jaw I saw would undo me.

It is a beautiful image, Gen, and you have an amazing ability to give life to your images.

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We plant various milkweed and other plants specifically for Monarch butterflies - here's Joe-Pye weed plant covered with newly hatched Monarchs in our back yard  last September just before the migration south.

 

many-newly-hatched-monarch-butterflies-danaus-plexippus-feeding-on-joe-pye-weed-flowers-in-a-garden-in-speculator-ny-usa-WWP13T.jpg

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9 hours ago, Dave Nelson said:

We plant various milkweed and other plants specifically for Monarch butterflies - here's Joe-Pye weed plant covered with newly hatched Monarchs in our back yard  last September just before the migration south.

 

many-newly-hatched-monarch-butterflies-danaus-plexippus-feeding-on-joe-pye-weed-flowers-in-a-garden-in-speculator-ny-usa-WWP13T.jpg

Oh, Dave!! I have an empty bed where I’ve wanted to plant one of the milkweeds. I haven’t figured out which one. Some send underground runners that will spread everywhere, and I don’t want those. How does this one do?

What a beautiful image, I’m so envious. I’m on one of the Monarch migration paths. I’m counting 10 butterflies here. Did I miss any?

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Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis), Brazil

 

A61WJT.jpg

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37 minutes ago, gvallee said:

Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis), Brazil

 

A61WJT.jpg

That looks like one mean bird! Red eyes, open beak...

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14 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

That looks like one mean bird! Red eyes, open beak...

 

Alright then, I'll post something sweet.

Male Red Cheeked Cordon Bleu (Uraeginthus bengalus), The Gambia

 

B6WD8R.jpg

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On 19/04/2020 at 23:37, gvallee said:

Red breasted Toucan (Ramphastos dicolorus) 

 

 

Love the Toucan!

 

Gen, I just peeked at top of your crop.  My, my what is this???

 

carpet-python-morelia-spilota-bredli-cur

 

Not a household pet I hope? :)

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Posted (edited)
23 minutes ago, Autumn Sky said:

Love the Toucan!

 

Gen, I just peeked at top of your crop.  My, my what is this???

 

carpet-python-morelia-spilota-bredli-cur

 

Not a household pet I hope? :)

 

I had many inverts pets  but never had a snake! This one is a fierce-looking but inoffensive Australian Carpet Python. Separated from me by an inch of glass!

Edited by gvallee
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5 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

I had many inverts pets  but never had a snake! This one is a fierce-looking but inoffensive Australian Carpet Python. Separated from me by an inch of glass!

 

Novel idea, making carpets out of pythons.

 

Allan

 

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Gen, I keep seeing new things. First, green butterflies.  Now an aqua-colored bird. Beautiful.

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I'll share a nice turtle

isolated-hawksbill-marine-sea-turtle-swi

 

This is Hawksbill Turtle, swimming in pool at Turtle Rescue Center, Cayo Largo Del Sur, Cuba.  They rescue whole bunch of hatched turtles every year that would get swept by hurricanes and die;  raise them and then release back to ocean.    If you are ever here, don't spend whole time suntanning on the beach, go and see this.  It is very small, but well worth a visit.

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Big pink tulip spotted a few days ago. Also inoffensive AFAIK...

 

closeup-of-the-petals-of-a-large-pink-tu

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20 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Oh, Dave!! I have an empty bed where I’ve wanted to plant one of the milkweeds. I haven’t figured out which one. Some send underground runners that will spread everywhere, and I don’t want those. How does this one do?

What a beautiful image, I’m so envious. I’m on one of the Monarch migration paths. I’m counting 10 butterflies here. Did I miss any?

We plant swamp milkweed, Asclepias incarnata, where the monarchs lay eggs which hatch into caterpillars.  After the butterfly emerges from the chrysalis they feast on the Joe-Pye weed.  Neither of these plants seem to spread underground.  We purchase most of the plants, but find and liberate some from the wild.  Both are common here in the Adirondacks.

I believe 10 is the correct number.

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1 hour ago, Dave Nelson said:

We plant swamp milkweed, Asclepias incarnata, where the monarchs lay eggs which hatch into caterpillars.  After the butterfly emerges from the chrysalis they feast on the Joe-Pye weed.  Neither of these plants seem to spread underground.  We purchase most of the plants, but find and liberate some from the wild.  Both are common here in the Adirondacks.

I believe 10 is the correct number.

I did some research after seeing your post and swamp milkweed is what I decided on. And I also read up on Joe-Pye.  How much sun does yours get? I have 2 beds with only 3 hours or so of sun. Not sure if that’s enough.

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3 hours ago, Autumn Sky said:

I'll share a nice turtle

isolated-hawksbill-marine-sea-turtle-swi

 

This is Hawksbill Turtle, swimming in pool at Turtle Rescue Center, Cayo Largo Del Sur, Cuba.  They rescue whole bunch of hatched turtles every year that would get swept by hurricanes and die;  raise them and then release back to ocean.    If you are ever here, don't spend whole time suntanning on the beach, go and see this.  It is very small, but well worth a visit.

Yes, I would love to see the turtles.
I caught a turtle once on my fishing line. It was huge. Poor thing. I got some needle-nosed pliers to take the hook out and release it. I put my foot lightly on its shell so it would hold still long enough to get the hook out. All of a sudden, what seemed like two feet of neck and beak shot out and whipped around to try to bite my foot.

I think they heard my scream in town ten miles away. My husband had to do the rescue work while I tried to quit shaking.

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hermit-crabs-or-decapod-crustacean-walki

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Gen, I keep seeing new things. First, green butterflies.  Now an aqua-colored bird. Beautiful.

 

Have you met our dainty Fairywrens?

 

EJ6K0R.jpg

 

2AYK0YF.jpg

 

Edited by gvallee

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I did some research after seeing your post and swamp milkweed is what I decided on. And I also read up on Joe-Pye.  How much sun does yours get? I have 2 beds with only 3 hours or so of sun. Not sure if that’s enough.

Our plants are mostly in full sun - not sure how they would do with only 3 hours.  

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5 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:


I caught a turtle once on my fishing line. It was huge. Poor thing. I got some needle-nosed pliers to take the hook out and release it. I put my foot lightly on its shell so it would hold still long enough to get the hook out. All of a sudden, what seemed like two feet of neck and beak shot out and whipped around to try to bite my foot.

I think they heard my scream in town ten miles away. My husband had to do the rescue work while I tried to quit shaking.

You can't really blame poor beast, can you.  But its a great story!  I am glad it seems to have ended well (for both sides!)

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