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Betty LaRue

Post a beautiful nature picture

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Came across this beauty in a boggy bit of stream. Rather surprised to find it’s not native to the UK and it’s actually illegal to sell it. 

 

western-skunk-cabbage-in-flower-S354E3.j

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Posted (edited)

 

Small Tortoiseshell butterfly feeding on blossom of Buddleja bush.

 

small-tortoiseshell-butterfly-feeding-on-blossom-of-buddleja-bush-JFYTWW.jpg
 
 

Peacock butterfly feeding on blossom of Buddleja bush.

 

peacock-butterfly-feeding-on-blossom-of-buddleja-bush-W4WFDK.jpg
 
 
Thought I would post these two as so far this year with the Buddleja being out in flower for some time I have not seen one butterfly on them.
 
Where have all the butterflies gone?
 
Allan
 
Edited by Allan Bell
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

Where have all the butterflies gone?

We had a Red Admiral on the lilac yesterday, which I haven't seen for a while. We have a buddleia bush too, but I massacred it this year, so probably no dice.

Here's my only butterfly from Kos. I may already have posted it.

swallowtail-butterfly-papilio-machaon-kos-greece-E5PMEH.jpg
Edited by spacecadet

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Couple of pics taken just yesterday.   This is all  non-accessible now because Vehicle Access to National / Provincial parks has been closed due to COVID-19,  but I live in the mountains and am able to cycle. 

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=275154

Gap Lake, popular recreation area -- just starting to melt -- looking east.   There is picnic area where people come to picnic, fish or launch a boat.  This is all off now, and parking lot has been closed

 

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Canadian Pacific Train passing by Gap lake, pic taken from that closed parking lot.  Nice reflection of still snowy peaks,  Pigeon Mtn. is right and Mt. McGillivray left.

 

I am not uploading these photos to Alamy, but thought were nice enough to share

 

 

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21 hours ago, Autumn Sky said:

You can't really blame poor beast, can you.  But its a great story!  I am glad it seems to have ended well (for both sides!)

No, I can’t blame it. But I give a warning to everyone who decides to handle a turtle. Their necks are about 4 times longer than you think they are. My grown son held one at total arms length just admiring it and it shot out that neck and severely bit his upper lip. I had to take him to the emergency room to have his lip sewed back together.

I really don’t know how they fit those necks inside their shells! :D
Love the beautiful butterflies.

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Autumn Sky...those are lovely scenics. I didn’t think one could post an image on the forum unless it was on Alamy.  ??

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

Autumn Sky...those are lovely scenics. I didn’t think one could post an image on the forum unless it was on Alamy.  ??

Betty, you can.  All you need is image hosted on some public Internet web page.  Then you just point to it with this "Insert Image from URL" button.

I participate in some outdoor forums & usually upload sized pics from my hikes,   so it is getting it from there.

 

Re turtle.  I will remember this with the neck.  But point is -- these are wild animals. They can look cute and harmless, but these are animals and if they feel threatened they will defend themselves.  Deer usually run away from people, right?  But this one was kinda standing still, and I got just a bit too close wanting to take good pic.  Can you tell he was not happy at all?

 

young-bull-deer-during-rut-season-lookin

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Bay-headed Tanager (Tangara gyrola), Panama

 

BJXK4A.jpg

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1 hour ago, gvallee said:

Bay-headed Tanager (Tangara gyrola), Panama

 

BJXK4A.jpg

 

Charming little bird. In what part of Panama did you spot it?

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47 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Charming little bird. In what part of Panama did you spot it?

 

This was taken at Paradise Gardens in Boquete, John. An enchanting place with a very tragic story.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

This was taken at Paradise Gardens in Boquete, John. An enchanting place with a very tragic story.

 

I had to Google Paradise Gardens. I visited Boquete in 1999. I guess the gardens and rescue center weren't around then.

Edited by John Mitchell

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These are such gorgeous birds. It must be a bit awkward carrying around a beak like that, though.

 

Keel-billed Toucan, Honduras

 

kell-billed-toucan-ramphastos-sulfuratus

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4 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

It must be a bit awkward carrying around a beak like that, though.

the things we do for sex.

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13 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

the things we do for sex.

 

Speak for yourself... 😎

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15 hours ago, Autumn Sky said:

Betty, you can.  All you need is image hosted on some public Internet web page.  Then you just point to it with this "Insert Image from URL" button.

I participate in some outdoor forums & usually upload sized pics from my hikes,   so it is getting it from there.

 

Re turtle.  I will remember this with the neck.  But point is -- these are wild animals. They can look cute and harmless, but these are animals and if they feel threatened they will defend themselves.  Deer usually run away from people, right?  But this one was kinda standing still, and I got just a bit too close wanting to take good pic.  Can you tell he was not happy at all?

 

young-bull-deer-during-rut-season-lookin

I did that with a female moose in Yellowstone. But I kept a tree handy to dodge behind if she took offense.
Moose are dangerous. There were people half again closer, in the wide open. If she had charged, they wouldn’t have stood a chance at getting away without injuries, if not death. They strike with their front legs then stomp you.

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I did that with a female moose in Yellowstone. But I kept a tree handy to dodge behind if she took offense.
Moose are dangerous. There were people half again closer, in the wide open. If she had charged, they wouldn’t have stood a chance at getting away without injuries, if not death. They strike with their front legs then stomp you.

Yes.  And people can get very stupid.  Do you remember couple of years ago, that idiot in Yellowstone got out of the car and waved with red shirt teasing buffalo?  Over here in Canada a guy got out of the car, took his shirt off and assumed boxer stance with grizzly bear by roadside.   (He got hefty fine by Parks Canada later for disturbing wildlife).   Worlds can not describe such stupidity.

 

Re moose -- we got them quite a lot around here, but I still get to take that killer shot.  This is best one I got, I call it "mama moose"

 

mama-moose-alces-alces-and-calf-looking-

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Autumn Sky said:

Yes.  And people can get very stupid.  Do you remember couple of years ago, that idiot in Yellowstone got out of the car and waved with red shirt teasing buffalo?  Over here in Canada a guy got out of the car, took his shirt off and assumed boxer stance with grizzly bear by roadside.   (He got hefty fine by Parks Canada later for disturbing wildlife).   Worlds can not describe such stupidity.

 

Re moose -- we got them quite a lot around here, but I still get to take that killer shot.  This is best one I got, I call it "mama moose"

 

mama-moose-alces-alces-and-calf-looking-

Love mama moose.

Yes I remember the idiot at Yellowstone.  Those are the people who put on lampshades at parties, dive into water of unknown depth, and feel a need to show off and be the center of attention. Oh.  And one brick short of a load.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Sandhill Cranes calling just prior to roosting in a shallow lake to avoid fox and predators attacks.

The lift off at dawn of thousands of migratory sandhill cranes is a once in a lifetime show of nature that nobody should miss.

Bosque del Apache, New Mexico, USA.

 

A0BWYK.jpg

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5 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I had to Google Paradise Gardens. I visited Boquete in 1999. I guess the gardens and rescue center weren't around then.

 

I visited in 2009. Paradise Gardens was a most magical, peaceful and relaxing place. You wandered through a maze of tropical plants, water features, babbling running streams, feeding stations where the most amazingly coloured wild birds would come right next to you. It was the labour of love of a British expat couple. One day, they were involved in a car accident at night. A local car with no lights, no insurance, no safety belts collided with them. Sadly, a young boy in the local car died. The British man was seriously injured with internal bleeding, but was denied being taken to hospital and was thrown in jail instead. Later on, the local family wanted blood money. The couple was harassed, had their passport confiscated. They had to flee the country leaving everything behind. Some of the animals they left behind died. A complete heartache. At least, that's the version they posted on the internet. 

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Gen, you take some of the most exquisite images. The backlit Sandhills image has such life to it. It seems you have been everywhere. I’ve skied New Mexico, but haven’t photographed the wildlife there, other than a roadrunner. And it wasn’t very good. I think I was shaking with excitement too much since it was a surprise as I walked through the campground.

Too bad I didn’t have my camera when the scorpion cornered me in the camp shower stall.  Then it chased me around while I hurriedly threw my clothes on.  
Scary little buggers.

Betty

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

Gen, you take some of the most exquisite images. The backlit Sandhills image has such life to it. It seems you have been everywhere. I’ve skied New Mexico, but haven’t photographed the wildlife there, other than a roadrunner. And it wasn’t very good. I think I was shaking with excitement too much since it was a surprise as I walked through the campground.

Too bad I didn’t have my camera when the scorpion cornered me in the camp shower stall.  Then it chased me around while I hurriedly threw my clothes on.  
Scary little buggers.

Betty

 

Thank you Betty. I've travelled all my life, travel is my passion. Could there be a better combination than travel/photography?

I heard a story from a woman photographer. She was lying down flat on the ground to photograph a scorpion. The flash spooked him and he quickly ran for cover... straight into her clevage.

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5 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

I visited in 2009. Paradise Gardens was a most magical, peaceful and relaxing place. You wandered through a maze of tropical plants, water features, babbling running streams, feeding stations where the most amazingly coloured wild birds would come right next to you. It was the labour of love of a British expat couple. One day, they were involved in a car accident at night. A local car with no lights, no insurance, no safety belts collided with them. Sadly, a young boy in the local car died. The British man was seriously injured with internal bleeding, but was denied being taken to hospital and was thrown in jail instead. Later on, the local family wanted blood money. The couple was harassed, had their passport confiscated. They had to flee the country leaving everything behind. Some of the animals they left behind died. A complete heartache. At least, that's the version they posted on the internet. 

 

Wow, that is a sad story, but unfortunately that type of thing is not uncommon in some countries. The couple was probably fortunate to escape with their lives.

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I grew up in San Diego and (sadly) you did not drive your car into Mexico. You left it inside the USA and took a taxi into the centro in Tijuana because if you got into an accident you'd be put in jail.. I had the most wonderful toys bought in Mexico. A nice fat piggy bank with beautiful flowers painted on it and tiny dishes of Mexican pottery for my doll's house.

 

Paulette

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This Sandhill Crane is in the backyard of my friend in Homer, Alaska. They come every year and she feeds them. It is the joy of her very long life. She is 94 now.

 

DT0MYX.jpg

 

Sandhill Crane in Homer, Alaska

 

Paulette

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11 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

Thank you Betty. I've travelled all my life, travel is my passion. Could there be a better combination than travel/photography?

I heard a story from a woman photographer. She was lying down flat on the ground to photograph a scorpion. The flash spooked him and he quickly ran for cover... straight into her clevage.

I would have paid to see her reaction. I know mine are worthy of money...lol. I can’t help my reactions, but my family has always hated them, since the single scream that comes from my toes up scares them to death. I also do gasps well.

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