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The fly agarics have matured a bit.......(clickable)

DSC05935.jpg

Apparently the toxins are water-soluble so may be removed by parboiling, but the amount of nastiness can vary by an order of magnitude. From mmm not bad to slightly dead.

It would be a great meal if it didn't have the potential to be one's last.

Edited by spacecadet
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28 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

The fly agarics have matured a bit.......(clickable)

DSC05935.jpg

Apparently the toxins are water-soluble so may be removed by parboiling, but the amount of nastiness can vary by an order of magnitude. From mmm not bad to slightly dead.

It would be a great meal if it didn't have the potential to be one's last.

They showed red squirrels eating fly agarics last evening on BBC Autumn Watch - they are apparently unaffected by the toxins. It was interesting that the squirrels also cached some of the toadstools in trees for eating later.

Edited by VbFolly
typo
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2 hours ago, VbFolly said:

They showed red squirrels eating fly agarics last evening on BBC Autumn Watch - they are apparently unaffected by the toxins. It was interesting that the squirrels also cached some of the toadstools in trees for eating later.

Well, I'm sure keeping a close eye on the woodpile from now on. Another agaric is pushing its way up, so who knows how far the colony goes. That part of the garden doesn't get disturbed much.

Come to think of it, no part of the garden gets disturbed much.

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17 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Very nice image. I haven't gotten out much either. Hopefully we'll see a few nice days in early November.

 

BTW, don't forget to put US spellings -- e.g. color, colorful, etc. -- in your keywords alongside our strange British/Canadian "our" ones.

Thank you, John... can`t wait for dryer weather.. but, we must be careful what we wish for... some of my shrubs suffered through the summer because of not enough moisture... now we have the rain and I`m complaining.. I don`t think it`s the wetness, but the chilliness that makes me averse to going outside.

Good tip.. must remember the different spellings.

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23 hours ago, VbFolly said:

They showed red squirrels eating fly agarics last evening on BBC Autumn Watch - they are apparently unaffected by the toxins. It was interesting that the squirrels also cached some of the toadstools in trees for eating later.

The small mammals have been at one of ours too......this is the one in the foreground this morning, nice and fresh, mmm. Not reds, alas, but could be greys, or the rats. Not the one I buried last week. I'll spare you the image, although it was just dead, not yucky. Unless  get a request from a ratto-necrophile,  of course:blink:

DSC05976.jpg

 

Meanwhile I'd been ignoring the "ordinary" shrooms........we suspect we could have eaten these but don't worry we're not gamblers.

DSC05977.jpg

 

I'm leaning towards pavement mushroom, agaricus bitorquis, but I can't find any other images of mature fruits that have gone this shade of dirty yellow.

Horse mushroom, A. arvensis?

Edited by spacecadet
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6 hours ago, spacecadet said:

The small mammals have been at one of ours too......this is the one in the foreground this morning, nice and fresh, mmm. Not reds, alas, but could be greys, or the rats. Not the one I buried last week. I'll spare you the image, although it was just dead, not yucky. Unless  get a request from a ratto-necrophile,  of course:blink:

DSC05976.jpg

 

Meanwhile I'd been ignoring the "ordinary" shrooms........we suspect we could have eaten these but don't worry we're not gamblers.

DSC05977.jpg

 

I'm leaning towards pavement mushroom, agaricus bitorquis, but I can't find any other images of mature fruits that have gone this shade of dirty yellow.

Horse mushroom, A. arvensis?

 

One of the chicken fat mushrooms according to Seek who gave a dubious ID of Suillus americanus, which I don't believe is correct, but probably something in the Slippery Jacks/Suillus genus will be the right ID.   The S. americanus needs Eastern White Pines to cohabit with their mutual mycorrhizal bacteria. 

Edited by MizBrown
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9 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

 

One of the chicken fat mushrooms according to Seek who gave a dubious ID of Suillus americanus, which I don't believe is correct, but probably something in the Slippery Jacks/Suillus genus will be the right ID.   The S. americanus needs Eastern White Pines to cohabit with their mutual mycorrhizal bacteria. 

Thanks,  looking that up mine has gills not pores.. Sorry I didn't give full information.

Although the pine habitat is right- it's under a Scots pine.

Edited by spacecadet
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These little chaps popped up under the dome tent we put up so that friends could visit (till Wednesday anyway🙁)

About 1cm across and unidentified! (please)

DSC05983.jpg

DSC05984.jpg

Edited by spacecadet
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2 hours ago, spacecadet said:

These little chaps popped up under the dome tent we put up so that friends could visit (till Wednesday anyway🙁)

About 1cm across and unidentified! (please)

DSC05983.jpg

DSC05984.jpg

 

 

The nearest I could find is the Horse-Hair Fungus (Marasmius androsaceus) with a black stem. Usually grows to a height of 8cm.

 

To be honest I do not think it is that one.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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15 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

 

The nearest I could find is the Horse-Hair Fungus (Marasmius androsaceus) with a black stem. Usually grows to a height of 8cm.

 

To be honest I do not think it is that one.

 

Allan

 

Yes that has a much finer stem.

Hmm. Perhaps it's rare!

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2 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Yes that has a much finer stem.

Hmm. Perhaps it's rare!

 

There is another one in the Marasmius genre but the cap looks like a parachute. Could be the younger version you have?

 

Allan

 

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4 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

There is another one in the Marasmius genre but the cap looks like a parachute. Could be the younger version you have?

 

Allan

 

I would have seen how it matured but the dome gazebo tent thingy blew off in the night and flattened the lot!😀

Edited by spacecadet
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Yellow rubber ducks on a bath

yellow-rubber-ducks-on-a-bath-BYEF7H.jpg
 
 
Thought this would make an interesting alternative. Still recognisable as ducks.
 
Allan
 
Edited by Allan Bell
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Maraca Ginger is what we call this in the English-speaking expat community in Nicaragua.   Originally from Asia, one of the ornamental gingers, Zingiber spectabile.   This one took some camera shake image sharpening.   Taken at Laurel Finca in Jinotega Department in the countryside near the town.  I got a number of photos on that trip.   Harsh light, so some massaging there also helped.

 

2D8DT2G.jpg

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Clouds mimicking tree outline

clouds-mimicking-tree-outline-C52176.jpg
 
Allan
 
Think I may rework this image to give it a bit more punch.
 
ITMA
 
Edited by Allan Bell
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On 05/11/2020 at 16:57, Betty LaRue said:

Good catch, Allan! I don’t know if I would have noticed that. Very observant.

 

Thank you good lady.

 

Allan

 

PS I have done some more work on that image and will be reloading it when I am allowed to.

 

ITMA

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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On 05/11/2020 at 16:49, Allan Bell said:

Clouds mimicking tree outline

clouds-mimicking-tree-outline-C52176.jpg
 
Allan
 
Think I may rework this image to give it a bit more punch.
 
ITMA
 

 

That's a picture that you wouldn't have planned in advance  .....weird and wonderful nature playing tricks !

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