Jump to content
Betty LaRue

Post a beautiful nature picture

Recommended Posts

On 19/07/2020 at 04:55, MizBrown said:

 

Come to Nicaragua while you're there.  CR's highlands are higher, but we've got Lago Colcibolca.

Twist my arm...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do sloths do for fun on a Saturday night? Twist and shout? :D

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

What do sloths do for fun on a Saturday night? Twist and shout? :D

 

I have no idea which day they pick for the weekly trip to the ground to let their moths off for some ovipositing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Linaria purpurea, purple toadflax.

This is growing in some profusion at the end of the drive since it doesn't get driven over very often just now.

Now it's a couple of feet high it is definitely going to suffer when we're out and about again.

We don't have it elsewhere, so I wonder if it would mind being transplanted..........John?

DSC00528-2.jpg

 

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, spacecadet said:

Linaria purpurea, purple toadflax.

This is growing in some profusion at the end of the drive since it doesn't get driven over very often just now.

Now it's a couple of feet high it is definitely going to suffer when we're out and about again.

We don't have it elsewhere, so I wonder if it would mind being transplanted..........John?

DSC00528-2.jpg

 

Yes you can transplant or divide it.  Autumn or spring is the best time.  Seed propogation is the normal way of growung it.  Once you've got it it tends to crop up all over the place.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, John Richmond said:

Yes you can transplant or divide it.  Autumn or spring is the best time.  Seed propogation is the normal way of growung it.  Once you've got it it tends to crop up all over the place.

Well, if it happens, it will be now, to save it from being driven over! It won't find much light near where it is now so I was hoping to negotiate some space in the herb bed out back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, spacecadet said:

Well, if it happens, it will be now, to save it from being driven over! It won't find much light near where it is now so I was hoping to negotiate some space in the herb bed out back.

Transplant it with as much rootball as possible (never bare root at this time of year), cut it back a bit to reduce water loss and keep it well watered for this year and it should be OK

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, John Richmond said:

as much rootball as possible

Not much chance of that!- the drive is very gravelly so it was a bit of a scrabble, but I've done my best and hope it's not spoilt with the potting compost I put in the hole.

Anway, now sitting happily by the pond (the toadflax, not me) we'll see in due course if it's worth moving any more.

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have images of wild yellow toadflax.  Did not know that there was a purple toadflax. Is the purple cultivated?

 

Allan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
19 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I have images of wild yellow toadflax.  Did not know that there was a purple toadflax. Is the purple cultivated?

 

Allan

 

Not by us;)

We just get what turns up, in this case, in the middle of the drive!

But yes, apparently you can buy them. It's not native, Italian apparently, which may be why it's not in all the books. The older ones anyway.

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

This little American robin fledgling sat on the window well cover to my basement window. It was totally unafraid and allowed me to get quite close. Such a cutie! Patiently waiting for mom or dad to stuff a worm down its gullet.
As you see, it still has the sharp tip on its beak that it used to peck its way out of the egg.

american-robin-turdus-migratorius-fledgl

Edited by Betty LaRue
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

A day out to Bempton Cliffs, Yorkshire.

 

Puffin. 

2C8ABMA.jpg

 

 

 

 

Gannet.

 

2C8ABP7.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hugo-a-french-bulldog-living-in-liverpoo

 

I came upon this wild chien outside a pub on Castle Street. I tried to say "hello, I'm a friend" in his language (French? Dog? Scouse?), but he would have none of it. I wanted to turn and run but I managed to keep calm and back away slowly. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I came upon this wild chien outside a pub on Castle Street. I tried to say "hello, I'm a friend" in his language (French? Dog? Scouse?), but he would have none of it. I wanted to turn and run but I managed to keep calm and back away slowly. 

 

Ah, there is wildlife in your neighbourhood after all Edo! He looks feisty. You did well to carefully back away and not get chomped!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/07/2020 at 06:48, Betty LaRue said:

This little American robin fledgling sat on the window well cover to my basement window. It was totally unafraid and allowed me to get quite close. Such a cutie! Patiently waiting for mom or dad to stuff a worm down its gullet.
As you see, it still has the sharp tip on its beak that it used to peck its way out of the egg.

american-robin-turdus-migratorius-fledgl

Edited yesterday at 09:38 by Betty LaRue

 

I love this Betty. Fledglings do often seem to be much less afraid of us humans than adults birds - so trusting and innocent and often curious. We have a pair of galahs who seem to have a nest in the backyard now, so expecting to hear squawking sometime soon (as baby galahs are VERY LOUD, but loveable at the same time even if somewhat scrawny). Your little robin is incredibly cute and I love the speckled colours.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Alan Beastall said:

A day out to Bempton Cliffs, Yorkshire.

 

Puffin. 

2C8ABMA.jpg

 

 

 

 

Gannet.

 

2C8ABP7.jpg

 

 

I love both of these Alan. I like how the puffin is in the landscape and the yellow flowers in the foreground. I love the gannet too. I've made some attempts at similar shots panning with birds in flight. I have one of an ibis I might upload here that I took a long time ago. I think yours works extremely well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Sally. Sometimes it's a trial and error to get the shutter speed and panning correct to get a decent image.

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sally R said:

 

I love this Betty. Fledglings do often seem to be much less afraid of us humans than adults birds - so trusting and innocent and often curious. We have a pair of galahs who seem to have a nest in the backyard now, so expecting to hear squawking sometime soon (as baby galahs are VERY LOUD, but loveable at the same time even if somewhat scrawny). Your little robin is incredibly cute and I love the speckled colours.

Thank you, Sally. There isn’t an ugly baby animal. No matter how ugly. 😉😉

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

hugo-a-french-bulldog-living-in-liverpoo

 

I came upon this wild chien outside a pub on Castle Street. I tried to say "hello, I'm a friend" in his language (French? Dog? Scouse?), but he would have none of it. I wanted to turn and run but I managed to keep calm and back away slowly. 

 

It is the larger dogs I am wary of. That one you met you can pick up and throw away.🤨

 

Allan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 24/07/2020 at 12:53, Allan Bell said:

 

It is the larger dogs I am wary of. That one you met you can pick up and throw away.🤨

 

Allan

 

The big ones will turn your blood cold...they’ll go for the throat sometimes. But the small ones are the ankle-biters, and can do their own brand of damage. 
My mother had a half poodle, half cocker spaniel once. I was visiting when Mom’s insurance agent called on her. Danny barked once or twice when he came in, then laid down through the visit. When the guy got up to leave, Danny shadowed him then nipped his heel above his shoe as he was stepping out of the door. It was the Cocker in him. They can be feisty.

Edited by Betty LaRue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A supposedly true story that makes me smile is the one about the doberman who didn't stop the burglar from coming in but didn't let him leave.

 

Paulette

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

TTDYYH.jpg

 

My 4 year old Gordon setter Ben, a little over 80lbs 

 

Edited by Shergar
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Shergar said:

TTDYYH.jpg

 

My 4 year old Gordon setter Ben, a little over 80lbs 

 

I could use some of that cool about now. Beautiful scenery.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Shergar said:

TTDYYH.jpg

 

My 4 year old Gordon setter Ben, a little over 80lbs 

 

I love this photo Shergar. The scenery is beautiful on its own but having your dog Ben in there as well really makes it. A few years ago I went to Bhutan and there were many dogs wandering about who were friendly. I can remember watching a scene of the sun setting and cloud coming down from the mountains over a village and valley, and this lovely dog just came and watched the scene with me. Your photo reminds me of that memory.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Sally R said:

 

I love this photo Shergar. The scenery is beautiful on its own but having your dog Ben in there as well really makes it. A few years ago I went to Bhutan and there were many dogs wandering about who were friendly. I can remember watching a scene of the sun setting and cloud coming down from the mountains over a village and valley, and this lovely dog just came and watched the scene with me. Your photo reminds me of that memory.

 

You should have brought that dog back home. He/she was a sole-mate.

 

Allan

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.