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1 minute ago, Allan Bell said:

It was strange that Ciba withdrew the rights for Ilford to use their name as they eventually became the owners of Ilford.

Ciba-Geigy bought Ilford in 1969. The name had to change when they sold Ilford in 1992.

A very good history of Ilford here

https://www.photomemorabilia.co.uk/Ilford/Cibachrome.html#anchorCiba19

Anyone else remember Agfachrome Speed? It was a short-lived contrasty reversal dye-diffusion material with a single-bath process. A 10x8 sheet cost about £2 all in so you had to be careful with it. I couldn't generally afford to use it for my own images but used to make prints for astrophotographers- the high contrast suited astronomical images.

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31 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

The lockdown continues and so do I.

 

https://edostrange.blogspot.com/2020/04/yesterdays-problems.html

 

 

In your blog you mention fashion and one thing I don't really understand is that the young people buy clothes, particularly jeans, and pay a lot of money for items that are ripped, torn or partly shredded that look as though it is worn out before they put them on. Then have the nerve to say look how fashionable I am.

In Cambridge it looks worse than some of the ladies and gentlemen of the street.

 

Allan

 

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Having spent my teenage years being asked ‘you’re not going out looking like that are you?’ I always swore not to criticise what the kids wore. Freedom of expression and all that!

..but this fashion for gaping holes round your knees? I don’t get it.  

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10 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

I don’t get it.

 

I remember being in the car with my two lads, a fair few years ago. They insisted on playing ‘their’ music. I said “That’s giving me a headache”. The eldest looked me in the eye and said “That’s what it’s for” (and now he’s a dad)…

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17 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

Having spent my teenage years being asked ‘you’re not going out looking like that are you?’ I always swore not to criticise what the kids wore. Freedom of expression and all that!

..but this fashion for gaping holes round your knees? I don’t get it.  

 

Nothing new about that. When I was a kid I always had holes in the knees of my trousers. 😃

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On 19/04/2020 at 01:39, Ed Rooney said:

The lockdown continues and so do I.

 

https://edostrange.blogspot.com/2020/04/yesterdays-problems.html

 

 

I actually do remember listening to "The Shadow" on the radio. This would have been in the 50's when I was a little kid living in London (England not Ontario). Every night, my parents and I used to huddle around the radio in the large kitchen of our damp rented flat. As I remember, there was no central heating, so you had to put a shilling in the electric heater in order to get some warmth.

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Were you still in the UK in 1963 and the long cold winter which started just before Christmas 1962 and lasted till early/mid March 1963?

Deep snow and extremely cold. We even had ice on the inside of our windows. I remember Dad going into the attic with a blow-lamp to thaw the ice blockages in the pipes many times. The only good thing was that it seemed to be sunny all the days making it seem to be not so bad.

 

I even have vague memories of the other bad winter of 1947. At that time we were living on a farm. Really deep snow and yes it is true that you would see a farmer or farm worker moving about in the snow and not realising they were mounted on horses.

 

Allan

 

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15 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

Were you still in the UK in 1963 and the long cold winter which started just before Christmas 1962 and lasted till early/mid March 1963?

Deep snow and extremely cold. We even had ice on the inside of our windows. I remember Dad going into the attic with a blow-lamp to thaw the ice blockages in the pipes many times. The only good thing was that it seemed to be sunny all the days making it seem to be not so bad.

 

I even have vague memories of the other bad winter of 1947. At that time we were living on a farm. Really deep snow and yes it is true that you would see a farmer or farm worker moving about in the snow and not realising they were mounted on horses.

 

Allan

 

 

Yes, Allan, I was studying in London for that winter of 1963 and had clothing from Southern California. I wonder how I survived. I had noooooo idea how to deal with cold. We had little gas fires in the classrooms and I would huddle nearby. Then the teacher would decide we needed some fresh air and throw the window open. I had a sweet roommate who was originally from Czechoslovakia and she did me the kindness of getting up first in the mornings and lighting the paraffin heater. We had long breaks at Christmas and Easter and I would flee to Sevilla for the warmth. I lived near where Sylvia Plath lived when she committed suicide. She had the same awful flu I had that year and I always thought the cold and the flu did not help with her despair. Fortunately, I actually had a fabulous time and finally got over the stomach issues with the flu after a couple of months of eating nothing but yogurt, toast and honey.

 

Paulette

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I've activated my Facebook account trying to find a way to promote my blog. But I don't see how to do that. I have no expectation of making money with my blog, but I want to find a way to alert readers of its existence. 

 

Edo

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2 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

I've activated my Facebook account trying to find a way to promote my blog. But I don't see how to do that. I have no expectation of making money with my blog, but I want to find a way to alert readers of its existence. 

 

Edo

Hi Edo,

On your Facebook profile home page, click on 'Create' on the blue ribbon at the top.

Create 'Page'

So you end up with your personal profile, and then a separate Page (or pages if you want to do multiple different things) to advertise your business or hobby:

https://www.facebook.com/frostsfineart/

 

(I'm not doing much with the page at the moment because I'm taking a break from painting, but you get the idea)

Steve

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Thanks, Steve . . . dunk-a-Shane. Does that mean 'push Alan Ladd's head under the water?'

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2 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Thanks, Steve . . . dunk-a-Shane. Does that mean 'push Alan Ladd's head under the water?'

Bitter ser! They speak a funny dialect in Austria, but I'm back in the UK now, so no longer a stranger in a strange land (well, apart from the strangeness that is lockdown)

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3 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Thanks, Steve . . . dunk-a-Shane. Does that mean 'push Alan Ladd's head under the water?'

 

Blimey Ed, you need to be of a certain age to get that one!! 🤔 🧐

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Shane is a film everyone should see.

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16 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Shane is a film everyone should see.

 

In the 1970’s I worked with a girl  who was called Shane because her mother rather liked Alan Ladd!

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It was on the  TV as a re-run during the geriatric hour recently. I had a look for a few minutes but to be honest, I'm not sure it survived the test of time well

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I made my sons watch it when they were young teens. They still haven’t forgiven me all these years later. 

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On 21/04/2020 at 12:02, Allan Bell said:

Were you still in the UK in 1963 and the long cold winter which started just before Christmas 1962 and lasted till early/mid March 1963?

Deep snow and extremely cold. We even had ice on the inside of our windows. I remember Dad going into the attic with a blow-lamp to thaw the ice blockages in the pipes many times. The only good thing was that it seemed to be sunny all the days making it seem to be not so bad.

 

I even have vague memories of the other bad winter of 1947. At that time we were living on a farm. Really deep snow and yes it is true that you would see a farmer or farm worker moving about in the snow and not realising they were mounted on horses.

 

Allan

 

 

We were all taken out of school by the headmaster to watch someone drive a Mini across the frozen Thames. As he said 'the boys will never see anything like that again"

 

Alex

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On ‎09‎/‎01‎/‎2020 at 09:36, MDM said:

 

 

Edo - I think you are quite an amazing guy doing what you are doing at your age. Don't let it all overwhelm you. 

 

Change is not new - it is always happening. Nobody ever died in a car crash before they invented cars. Or lost their digital images because they forgot to back them up before they invented digital cameras and scanners. 

 

The 1930s had the rise of fascism in Europe and Stalinism in Russia. Then there was the Holocaust and World War 2. The 60s had the youth revolution - Liverpool was one of the main centres of this. The Cold War and fear of annihiliation. I remember the Bay of Pigs and being incredibly scared as an 8 year old  kid. Has that changed? Well maybe for a while but what is around the corner with recent events in the Middle East? 

 

And so on and on. Politicians, terrorists and criminals will use whatever technology is at their disposal to controi and steal. We need security (cyber or otherwise) because human nature is the way it is.

 

I am with John Walker here - embrace it and get the best out of it. I have just solved a problem with reinstalling MacOs Catalina on an external drive and it feels good. I am about to start experimenting with focus stacking using the auto feature on my D850 and Helicon Focus. The day I stop learning they can take me away.

 

And Chuck is a Dead Head?  I would never have guessed? Keep on truckin' man. 😀

Michael,

 

No not a "Dead Head", but I do have one Dead CD stacked in my auto along with Tull and T REX.

 

I do like what you wrote and agree.

 

Be Well,

 

Chuck

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59 minutes ago, Chuck Nacke said:

I do have one Dead CD stacked in my auto along with Tull and T REX.

 

Chuck

 

Saw T Rex at the London Lyceum, must have been early 1969. Still got a couple of their albums on vinyl!

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Posted (edited)

Hmm. Shane was nominated for five Oscars and gets 97% on Rotten Tomatoes. 

 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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On ‎23‎/‎04‎/‎2020 at 11:13, Thyrsis said:

 

Saw T Rex at the London Lyceum, must have been early 1969. Still got a couple of their albums on vinyl!

Ira,

 

I envy you, but I was only 11 in 69 and thought the MONKEYS were great.... 

 

I did photograph a few rock and rollers, but they were mostly a pain, I would rather listen to their

music.  These days I am more into listening to Vysotsky ( I do wish I had photographed him).  The only rock

star that I worked with and photographed that was fun to be around was Stas Namin in Moscow.

 

You should check out Jim Marshall online, he passed away a few years ago.  He did some great rock and roll

photos and was a good friend.

 

Chuck

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