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Post a good thing that happened in your life today


Betty LaRue

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54 minutes ago, gvallee said:

Not today but tomorrow. Perhaps I should keep quiet not to jinx it.

After a long period of straight forward travel in our bus, tomorrow we'll deflate the tyres and leave the bitumen for a long, steep, bumpy, 4WD climb involving corrugation and creek crossing. 3 hours of it. It will take us to one of the marvels of Australia.

If successful, photos to come.

If unsuccessful, switch to the Bad Things thread.

Wish me luck!

 

 

GOOD LUCK.

 

Allan

 

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Got my 4th booster jab this morning -- twas Pfizer like the last one. The new COVID-19 vaccination station is less that a 10 minutes walk from my building, a few steps from the Beatles in bronze at Pier Head, and all snappy new, and not busy. No more £25 taxi rides!

 

Edo

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2 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Got my 4th booster jab this morning -- twas Pfizer like the last one. The new COVID-19 vaccination station is less that a 10 minutes walk from my building, a few steps from the Beatles in bronze at Pier Head, and all snappy new, and not busy. No more £25 taxi rides!

 

Edo

 

We'll have our 4th jab at the end of the month. We must get to a town first, about 250km away. 

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Got my 4th jab a couple of weeks ago...a good thing since they are dropping indoor mask mandates all over the place in the U.S.  When I was in Texas last week, few people were wearing masks.  The pandemic isn't over but people are over it.

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1 hour ago, gvallee said:

Not today but tomorrow. Perhaps I should keep quiet not to jinx it.

After a long period of straight forward travel in our bus, tomorrow we'll deflate the tyres and leave the bitumen for a long, steep, bumpy, 4WD climb involving corrugation and creek crossing. 3 hours of it. It will take us to one of the marvels of Australia.

If successful, photos to come.

If unsuccessful, switch to the Bad Things thread.

Wish me luck!

 

 

Good luck Gen!

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8 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

 

Good luck Gen!

 

Thank you Michael.  We just checked the map, 10 creek crossings! Yikes!!

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52 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

Got my 4th jab a couple of weeks ago...a good thing since they are dropping indoor mask mandates all over the place in the U.S.  When I was in Texas last week, few people were wearing masks.  The pandemic isn't over but people are over it.

 

I went into town (Lincoln) on Wednesday on the bus and it was packed. I was wearing a face mask and I think two others were. There was hardly anyone wearing masks in the shops, cafes and restaurants but I kept putting mine on.  I did get one or two funny looks as if to say, "Hey you don't need a mask now."

 

I am going to keep on wearing a face mask in enclosed spaces as long as I think fit, or we are officially told that it is not necessary any more.

 

Allan

 

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46 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

I went into town (Lincoln) on Wednesday on the bus and it was packed. I was wearing a face mask and I think two others were. There was hardly anyone wearing masks in the shops, cafes and restaurants but I kept putting mine on.  I did get one or two funny looks as if to say, "Hey you don't need a mask now."

 

I am going to keep on wearing a face mask in enclosed spaces as long as I think fit, or we are officially told that it is not necessary any more.

 

Allan

 

 

 

Not sure who you are going to believe in an official capacity but I suggest listening to medical experts and not politicians.

 

People now think it's all over since removal of restrictions. Case numbers are way down because there is no longer free testing for most people but there were 646 daily deaths reported on April 20th which is HUGE. Over 17,000 in hospital with Covid. Most of these  are among the most vulnerable sections of society so it's up to those who are vulnerable to take great care. Make sure the face mask is FFP2 as the surgical masks offer little protection to the wearer.

 

Excellent Guardian articles:  myths and more myths about endemicity and Covid becoming milder debunked.

 

 

Edited by MDM
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54 minutes ago, MDM said:

 

 

Not sure who you are going to believe in an official capacity but I suggest listening to medical experts and not politicians.

 

People now think it's all over since removal of restrictions. Case numbers are way down because there is no longer free testing for most people but there were 646 daily deaths reported on April 20th which is HUGE. Over 17,000 in hospital with Covid. Most of these  are among the most vulnerable sections of society so it's up to those who are vulnerable to take great care. Make sure the face mask is FFP2 as the surgical masks offer little protection to the wearer.

 

Excellent Guardian articles:  myths and more myths about endemicity and Covid becoming milder debunked.

 

 

 

I hope you're finally showing some improvement, Michael. 

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59 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

I hope you're finally showing some improvement, Michael. 


Thanks Edo. I’m a lot better than I was when I got out of hospital last October but the lows (in terms of energy and exhaustion) can still be very low. However, I’m getting fitter week by week at the moment by getting out for walks with my camera gear, mainly shooting video. That has been really positive as I had spent a lot of the winter laid out in bed or on the couch exhausted. 
 

I was referred to a Long Covid clinic back in November last which involved weekly and then fortnightly online meetings with a group of others with a similar condition. That was very good and one thing it taught me is that there are an awful lot of people far worse than me with Long Covid. I can function pretty well now even if I pay for it dearly afterwards in terms of exhaustion. Others are really struggling.

 

One striking thing is that there is not necessarily a correlation between the severity of the acute phase of the illness and the severity or longevity of Long Covid although those who ended up in comas in hospital  (thankfully not me) are definitely the worst off still. Another striking thing is that not one person in the group has actually recovered fully. This is a long term illness and there is no simple linear pathway out. That is one very very good reason for people to continue to take real care to avoid getting it at all. 

Edited by MDM
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25 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

That's a very sobering account, Michael. 🤔


Indeed Edo. Along with physical exhaustion the other most debilitating symptom that affects Long Covid sufferers seems to be brain fog. I’ve kept my mind very active throughout and it is not really a major issue for me except when I get very physically tired at which point I just have to shut down and sleep. However, som people are really messed up from it with symptoms akin to dementia: serious stuff indeed.
 

The proportion of people suffering from Long Covid is not really known but the numbers probably run into the millions in the UK. However, the extent and severity is unknown as it is not reported. Almost all the people I know have been unable to resume their employment as normal. 

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Good to hear that you are able to get out and about Michael.

 

Three good things yesterday.

 

Firstly I fixed the hinged vent on the roof of my ancient greenhouse by replacing two very rusty screws with small bolts, nuts and washers. While rummaging for suitable ironmongery I came across a length of decorative chain used to attach bath plugs and went on to fix the chain attached to our bath plug. I can't remember when that plug last had a working chain, possibly when the lads were still at home more than 20 years ago. The next step will be to replace the bathroom suite, that is a repulsive dirty pink colour, which I have hated since buying the house new about 40 years ago. Part of me resists this change, as it all still works,  having had various taps and valves replaced in that time. 

 

But I digress, the third good thing was that we have finally got to grips with the Sainsbury's App, where they offer you decent savings on regularly purchased items. You have to check your phone to see which products are included, then use their handset to scan as you shop. No need to queue at the checkout, no more waiting as inefficient people before you suddenly realise that they actually have to pay for their groceries and then spend valuable minutes searching for their purse or wallet etc.

Edited by Bryan
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19 hours ago, MDM said:

 

 

Not sure who you are going to believe in an official capacity but I suggest listening to medical experts and not politicians.

 

People now think it's all over since removal of restrictions. Case numbers are way down because there is no longer free testing for most people but there were 646 daily deaths reported on April 20th which is HUGE. Over 17,000 in hospital with Covid. Most of these  are among the most vulnerable sections of society so it's up to those who are vulnerable to take great care. Make sure the face mask is FFP2 as the surgical masks offer little protection to the wearer.

 

Excellent Guardian articles:  myths and more myths about endemicity and Covid becoming milder debunked.

 

 

 

Hello Mick,

 

Thanks for the intervention.  Yes I would only listen to the medical experts in regards to covid.

 

It is good to see that you are improving after your last bout of covid and I do appreciate that it is a long haul for you but wish you all the best for the future.

 

Allan

 

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4 hours ago, Bryan said:

But I digress, the third good thing was that we have finally got to grips with the Sainsbury's App, where they offer you decent savings on regularly purchased items. You have to check your phone to see which products are included, then use their handset to scan as you shop. No need to queue at the checkout, no more waiting as inefficient people before you suddenly realise that they actually have to pay for their groceries and then spend valuable minutes searching for their purse or wallet etc.

Edited 4 hours ago by Bryan

 

That certainly sounds convenient but I hate the way "entry level" jobs keep disappearing. We have to check ourselves out at some stores and I hate being bossed around by a recorded voice as I try to juggle my wallet, the purchases and the bag I brought from home all at the same time. If they ever get rid of the employees who help out when I get stuck I'm sunk. I don't want to pump gas, either, or carry my own luggage. They weren't the greatest jobs but some people were employed doing those things years ago.

 

Paulette

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In the NY theatre world, we used to call those job-jobs. I did them all. Those entry level jobs have all changed. Now days, unskilled workers have to be basically skilled in digital stuff. Bike food delivery is the biggie now. And people are still needed to stack the shelves in supermarkets. 

 

Edo

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3 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

 

That certainly sounds convenient but I hate the way "entry level" jobs keep disappearing. We have to check ourselves out at some stores and I hate being bossed around by a recorded voice as I try to juggle my wallet, the purchases and the bag I brought from home all at the same time. If they ever get rid of the employees who help out when I get stuck I'm sunk. I don't want to pump gas, either, or carry my own luggage. They weren't the greatest jobs but some people were employed doing those things years ago.

 

Paulette

I shopped last week, and found an employee to put a heavy item in my cart. Then while checking out with a real person, I asked for someone to carry out and load it in my car. Jeff unloaded it for me at home.

I’m only just now shopping briefly without my cane, and I think I’m still on the no more than 5 pounds lifting regimen. I most definitely don’t want to do anything to undo the surgery I had at great pain and difficulties. 
Thank heavens I still had employees at the store to give me the help I’m used to. If they weren’t available, I’d need to resort to delivery, which is available. Whenever I have a larger grocery order, I place it online, schedule a pick up time, then drive there and an employee loads it in my car.

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6 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

 

That certainly sounds convenient but I hate the way "entry level" jobs keep disappearing. We have to check ourselves out at some stores and I hate being bossed around by a recorded voice as I try to juggle my wallet, the purchases and the bag I brought from home all at the same time. If they ever get rid of the employees who help out when I get stuck I'm sunk. I don't want to pump gas, either, or carry my own luggage. They weren't the greatest jobs but some people were employed doing those things years ago.

 

Paulette

Constant change is here to stay.   

 

Sainsbury's have abandoned their deli and fish counters and are now closing some of their in store cafes.   Retail is a tough environment, made tougher by the arrival of the discount stores ALDI and LIDL  while the move by Amazon into this field will be another factor.  The established operators have to adapt to survive.   Many people aren't prepared to pay a little extra for  better quality/service/environment  I fear.  

 

It's not just in retail however, I worked for a mercifully short while for a company that made glass fibre for insulation, and there was pressure to automate the production lines to shed staff, and that was over 30 years ago.   I've since visited factories where there are very few workers, robots and automated machinery is doing away with labour. The only folk on site were programmers, a few highly skilled mechanics, and cleaners.

 

The only places where I can see an increasing demand for personnel are in health care,  looking after the elderly,  and maybe hospitality.

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I always use the manned (womanned) checkouts. If the shop does not have any checkout with human beings or are all automated then I leave without goods.

 

Allan

 

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3 minutes ago, Bryan said:

and maybe hospitality.

 

It seems as though Japan are moving more into robotics for these jobs.

 

Allan

 

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I remember when my parents pulled into a gasoline station, an attendant fueled the car, washed the windshield, and checked the oil. No matter the weather, one didn’t have to experience it. Then it changed, but for awhile one could find one station that gave full service. Although the price one paid for it was in a much higher price per gallon of fuel. Not sure if any of those are still around.

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The wind is blowing fierce and has been for days. Fierce in the way of blowing the trailers of large semis over.  I braved the wind and bought potting soil and tomato plants. Also a bell pepper and a flower plant. I took my cane to brace me from blowing over.  Good people all around me loaded the two heavy soil bags into my cart, then into my car.

I have renewed faith in mankind.

My hair was greatly scrambled, of course. Oh, well. I just looked like I had my head in the clouds.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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13 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

I remember when my parents pulled into a gasoline station, an attendant fueled the car, washed the windshield, and checked the oil. No matter the weather, one didn’t have to experience it. Then it changed, but for awhile one could find one station that gave full service. Although the price one paid for it was in a much higher price per gallon of fuel. Not sure if any of those are still around.

I’m not sure if it’s the whole state of New Jersey (US), but where we’ve stopped it’s required that an attendant fill up your car. For me, it seems strange and I’d rather do it myself. 
 

I am currently staying in an ancient Italian town, sipping a glass of local red, and listening to the sound of light rain outside the window. Absolute bliss. 

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