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Post a bad thing that happened in your life today


Ed Rooney
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1 hour ago, sb photos said:

 

My current complication is due to being T2 diabetic. Years ago I was informed how flu could play havoc with my normally well controlled blood sugar. I remember this 'Being ill can make your blood sugar go all over the place. Your body tries to fight the illness by releasing stored glucose (sugar) into your blood stream to give you energy. But your body can’t produce enough or any insulin to cope with this, so your blood sugars rise.' This is what's happening to me now. To bring my blood sugar to safe levels I have had to substantially increase my insulin. It takes a bit of getting used to as I don't want to go too low. Will also change to a carb free diet to help.

T2 runs in my family, my dad had I got diagnosed some years ago. Thankfully just 2 pills a day for me topped up with Murphy's.(Nicer than Guinness) in my opinion.

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1 hour ago, aphperspective said:

T2 runs in my family, my dad had I got diagnosed some years ago. Thankfully just 2 pills a day for me topped up with Murphy's.(Nicer than Guinness) in my opinion.

 

Both my father and an aunt on my mothers side were T2. I had my fair share of sweet things before I was diagnosed, I don't miss them now. I initially though insulin would cramp my style, but you adapt and its no bother.

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3 hours ago, spacecadet said:

8 days is a long time to develop symptoms so you may have got it much more recently. Last time I tested positive I blamed a large event but it had also been 8 days prior. I now suspect it was a restaurant visit 3 days before when there were only two other diners and three or four staff. Three days is more on the money. I had symptoms in the next day or two.

None yet this time, only indoors candidate for infection 3 days prior.

 

I hate mysteries, but the only likely place of infection then could have been a waterside pub/restaurant close to my wife's work place. On Sunday I grabbed a seat under a tree outside, then when she arrived I went in for some drinks. The bar was pretty empty and thinking back I didn't wear a mask as I was only in there a few minutes.

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1 hour ago, sb photos said:

 

I hate mysteries, but the only likely place of infection then could have been a waterside pub/restaurant close to my wife's work place. On Sunday I grabbed a seat under a tree outside, then when she arrived I went in for some drinks. The bar was pretty empty and thinking back I didn't wear a mask as I was only in there a few minutes.

Its probably nearly impossible to pin down a place now with this variant, Allot of health advisors liken it to walking through clouds of confetti everywhere you go, sometimes you catch a bit sometimes you don't. 

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1 hour ago, sb photos said:

 

I hate mysteries, but the only likely place of infection then could have been a waterside pub/restaurant close to my wife's work place. On Sunday I grabbed a seat under a tree outside, then when she arrived I went in for some drinks. The bar was pretty empty and thinking back I didn't wear a mask as I was only in there a few minutes.

My faint line of yesterday has now gone so who knows. I shouldn't have had time, since my last clear test 7 days ago, to get it and recover.  On that occasion we visited family who we know didn't have it so it didn't come from there. Before that, 8 days clear.

We might as well toss a coin- perhaps I got it from the cat, and we don't have a cat. I'm assuming, I think correctly, that LFTs don't false positive. Anyway I took a second yesterday to confirm- positive too.

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On 14/07/2022 at 08:19, sb photos said:

Only a few days back i was saying I have so far avoided Covid, now finally have it. A very positive test result first this this morning. Likely caught from a trip into London last week. So far symptoms are mild, sore throat, and a mild continuous headache. I don't feel as if I have a temperature, thermometer read 37.29c. Yesterday had to clear my throat occasionally and had a ticklish cough, now subsided. Am fully vaccinated. Have plenty to do at home that I had been putting off for ages.

 

As expected, now my wife has joined me with Covid. She has similar symptoms but also has aching legs. She said the only advantage of Covid is she now isn't out in the sun and heat at the garden centre she works at all day.

 

Yesterday I felt so much better, so yesterday evening I took a local to me footpath walk. As expected I didn't see a soul. If I had seen another walker it would have been easy to avoid them. Perhaps I got carried away, my iPhone recorded I had walked 9.6km, and I was parched when I got home. Today my cough and sneezing that had almost gone is back, and this morning I dozed in my favourite chair for 4 hours, most unusual. Will take it easier now.

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My daughter has Covid now. Up to this time, she’d managed to avoid it. She’s extremely miserable. She has rheumatoid arthritis and takes meds that knocks her immune system down.

She’s been given an antiviral blister pack, because of scarcity, is only given to people like her or the elderly. They made her throw up.

She pretty much knows she got it in church.

My son has been taking me out to dinner one day on the weekend, but I told him I would be staying in (again) for awhile.

 

There are studies being done about possibly protective qualities of nicotine. Non-smokers could use the gum or patches. It was noticed in one of the European countries and China, that the percentage of smokers hospitalized didn’t match the numbers. Like China, something like 20-30 percent of the population being smokers, yet only a third of those or roundabouts being hospitalized. Don’t focus on my numbers because I didn’t write them down, and am giving generalities. They are doing further studies, but think possibly nicotine binds to cells and gives some protection against the virus getting in.

It will be interesting to eventually see the results of the studies.

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2 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

As expected, now my wife has joined me with Covid. She has similar symptoms but also has aching legs. She said the only advantage of Covid is she now isn't out in the sun and heat at the garden centre she works at all day.

 

Yesterday I felt so much better, so yesterday evening I took a local to me footpath walk. As expected I didn't see a soul. If I had seen another walker it would have been easy to avoid them. Perhaps I got carried away, my iPhone recorded I had walked 9.6km, and I was parched when I got home. Today my cough and sneezing that had almost gone is back, and this morning I dozed in my favourite chair for 4 hours, most unusual. Will take it easier now.

 

A typical case of too much too soon. I have done it myself in the past. Not with covid thank heavens.

 

Take it easy.

 

Allan

 

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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

My daughter has Covid now. Up to this time, she’d managed to avoid it. She’s extremely miserable. She has rheumatoid arthritis and takes meds that knocks her immune system down.

She’s been given an antiviral blister pack, because of scarcity, is only given to people like her or the elderly. They made her throw up.

She pretty much knows she got it in church.

My son has been taking me out to dinner one day on the weekend, but I told him I would be staying in (again) for awhile.

 

There are studies being done about possibly protective qualities of nicotine. Non-smokers could use the gum or patches. It was noticed in one of the European countries and China, that the percentage of smokers hospitalized didn’t match the numbers. Like China, something like 20-30 percent of the population being smokers, yet only a third of those or roundabouts being hospitalized. Don’t focus on my numbers because I didn’t write them down, and am giving generalities. They are doing further studies, but think possibly nicotine binds to cells and gives some protection against the virus getting in.

It will be interesting to eventually see the results of the studies.

 

I am off to the tobacconists right now. WHOA!

 

I did hear that people who were smokers in the past and present and their lungs had been affected were in more trouble when/if they caught covid than non-smokers.

 

I think I'll think it out again.

 

Allan

 

PS:   NOT making fun of covid it is too serious just making the point that it has been reported that smokers are in greater danger than non smokers.

 

ITMA

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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2 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

I am off to the tobacconists right now. WHOA!

 

I did hear that people who were smokers in the past and present and their lungs had been affected were in more trouble when/if they caught covid than non-smokers.

 

I think I'll think it out again.

 

Allan

 

PS:   NOT making fun of covid it is too serious just making the point that it has been reported that smokers are in greater danger than non smokers.

 

ITMA

 

Possibly nicotine balances out what happens in the lungs for a heavy smoker. I have seen with my own eyes with close friends or a few family who smoke/d that there seemed to be no discernible damage done to their lungs. In those cases, possibly the nicotine helped by keeping them from getting Covid or if they did, have a milder case. I knew of one of my husband’s relatives who had COPD from smoking, yet most of the males and several women in my husband’s extended family all smoked and you would never know it other than the odor clinging to their clothes. No hacking/coughing or shortness of breath.

The article only suggests nicotine might help protect against catching Covid to begin with, or maybe helping to have a milder case for the smokers without serious smoking-related lung problems.

My husband smoked 2-3 packs a day until he was around 60. He had lung surgery for a cartilage tumor, and the surgeon said his lungs were pink and healthy-looking. The non-cancerous tumor, he said, formed around some small particle breathed in. Could have been a larger piece of sawdust…he was always in his shop making something.

I would think those smokers suffering from COPD or other lung damage could be in the smaller % group that do get sick enough to be hospitalized.

All of this is just me trying to think it out. I smell smoke from too much brain activity.

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37 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Possibly nicotine balances out what happens in the lungs for a heavy smoker. I have seen with my own eyes with close friends or a few family who smoke/d that there seemed to be no discernible damage done to their lungs. In those cases, possibly the nicotine helped by keeping them from getting Covid or if they did, have a milder case. I knew of one of my husband’s relatives who had COPD from smoking, yet most of the males and several women in my husband’s extended family all smoked and you would never know it other than the odor clinging to their clothes. No hacking/coughing or shortness of breath.

The article only suggests nicotine might help protect against catching Covid to begin with, or maybe helping to have a milder case for the smokers without serious smoking-related lung problems.

My husband smoked 2-3 packs a day until he was around 60. He had lung surgery for a cartilage tumor, and the surgeon said his lungs were pink and healthy-looking. The non-cancerous tumor, he said, formed around some small particle breathed in. Could have been a larger piece of sawdust…he was always in his shop making something.

I would think those smokers suffering from COPD or other lung damage could be in the smaller % group that do get sick enough to be hospitalized.

All of this is just me trying to think it out. I smell smoke from too much brain activity.

I can relate to some of what you are saying Betty. I have always smoked and have never really had a problem with it. I caught the original and nasty Alpha version of Covid in late November 2019, before it was known about and spent four days in bed fighting for breath, I actually thought I had pneumonia. I recovered after a week and reported to the doctors in the UK early December and the receptionist informed me that there were no appointments until mid February. I said that it was not a problem as I had pretty well recovered but when she asked what had been the problem and I told her, she picked up the 'phone and spoke to the doctor ... I was in front of the doctor within 20 minutes. I found that a bit odd and still do, I often wonder if doctors were told to watch out for people reporting those symptoms. The doctor sent me straight to hospital for an x.ray and personally called me two days later to sat that scarring could be seen on one of my lungs which hadn't been on the previous x.ray a year earlier. A c.t scan followed and the specialist said he could only think it was down to my smoking but admitted that it was strange that the scarring was not there a year before and neither was the faint signs of early copd / emphysema .... but Covid still had not hit the headlines at that point but when it did, it made sense ! I followed the news with interest and one particular article caught my eye, a report from Israeli scientists saying that they had discovered that those that had caught Covid and recovered were in the safest category whilst those that had caught it, recovered and then went on to be vaccinated went into the highest risk category ... so I refrained from being vaccinated. I caught Delta last year but it was barely noticeable and I only knew I had it was because I caught it from my neighbour ! I don't feel as fit as I did pre Covid but not too bad and sorry to say, still enjoying a few cigarettes !

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38 minutes ago, Martyn said:

I can relate to some of what you are saying Betty. I have always smoked and have never really had a problem with it. I caught the original and nasty Alpha version of Covid in late November 2019, before it was known about and spent four days in bed fighting for breath, I actually thought I had pneumonia. I recovered after a week and reported to the doctors in the UK early December and the receptionist informed me that there were no appointments until mid February. I said that it was not a problem as I had pretty well recovered but when she asked what had been the problem and I told her, she picked up the 'phone and spoke to the doctor ... I was in front of the doctor within 20 minutes. I found that a bit odd and still do, I often wonder if doctors were told to watch out for people reporting those symptoms. The doctor sent me straight to hospital for an x.ray and personally called me two days later to sat that scarring could be seen on one of my lungs which hadn't been on the previous x.ray a year earlier. A c.t scan followed and the specialist said he could only think it was down to my smoking but admitted that it was strange that the scarring was not there a year before and neither was the faint signs of early copd / emphysema .... but Covid still had not hit the headlines at that point but when it did, it made sense ! I followed the news with interest and one particular article caught my eye, a report from Israeli scientists saying that they had discovered that those that had caught Covid and recovered were in the safest category whilst those that had caught it, recovered and then went on to be vaccinated went into the highest risk category ... so I refrained from being vaccinated. I caught Delta last year but it was barely noticeable and I only knew I had it was because I caught it from my neighbour ! I don't feel as fit as I did pre Covid but not too bad and sorry to say, still enjoying a few cigarettes !

 

I was never a heavy smoker and after giving up the first time I said to myself I had proved that I could give up at any time. I then promptly restarted 3 months later. Later that year in 1976 I finally gave up for good, one of the best things I ever did. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Compared to Covid this may seem a minor gripe but I am becoming increasingly concerned about the state of public transport in the UK. I've been a long term user of buses, while I would normally cycle to work, if the weather was very bad, e.g. widespread black ice, I would take the bus. Once retired, and with a free bus pass, we use the buses for shopping and for getting around locally. There was an excellent service, I can't recall being let down by the bus. Come Brexit and a shortage of lorry drivers haulage firms were forced to up drivers wages and some bus drivers were tempted to switch. Then came Covid with far fewer people travelling and drivers at risk. Move to the present and we have a reduced bus service operating and a spate of cancellations. 

 

Yesterday we had a pleasant day out using bus and train to visit a local beach resort. Getting there was no problem, but coming back our train had been cancelled due to technical problems so we had to wait for the next one. Then we boarded a bus only to find that the previous one had not turned up so ours was jammed full. Given the circumstances I think that the driver allowed more people to travel than regulations allow.

 

Now, as a retired person, this is a minor inconvenience for me, but for working people who rely on public transport to get to their place of work this is a major problem. It needs to be sorted but I have heard no mention of it in the recent political debates.

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2 hours ago, Bryan said:

Compared to Covid this may seem a minor gripe but I am becoming increasingly concerned about the state of public transport in the UK. I've been a long term user of buses, while I would normally cycle to work, if the weather was very bad, e.g. widespread black ice, I would take the bus. Once retired, and with a free bus pass, we use the buses for shopping and for getting around locally. There was an excellent service, I can't recall being let down by the bus. Come Brexit and a shortage of lorry drivers haulage firms were forced to up drivers wages and some bus drivers were tempted to switch. Then came Covid with far fewer people travelling and drivers at risk. Move to the present and we have a reduced bus service operating and a spate of cancellations. 

 

Yesterday we had a pleasant day out using bus and train to visit a local beach resort. Getting there was no problem, but coming back our train had been cancelled due to technical problems so we had to wait for the next one. Then we boarded a bus only to find that the previous one had not turned up so ours was jammed full. Given the circumstances I think that the driver allowed more people to travel than regulations allow.

 

Now, as a retired person, this is a minor inconvenience for me, but for working people who rely on public transport to get to their place of work this is a major problem. It needs to be sorted but I have heard no mention of it in the recent political debates.

 

Similar thing here. Stagecoach cutting services due to lack of drivers. The bus service runs every half hour through our village but now and again one is cut and no warnings given. This means if I get to the stop about 10 minutes before the bus is due and it does not arrive. I have to wait another half hour and it is not worth going back home to return for the next bus as it would take half an hour round trip.

 

Allan

 

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On 18/07/2022 at 20:01, Betty LaRue said:

the nicotine helped by keeping them from getting Covid or if they did, have a milder case.

Careful with the quack theories.........

 

On 18/07/2022 at 20:53, Martyn said:

so I refrained from being vaccinated.

...........and dangerous decisions such as this!

Something to keep to yourself, I think. Vaccination is far, far safer than COVID.

Edited by spacecadet
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4 hours ago, Bryan said:

Compared to Covid this may seem a minor gripe but I am becoming increasingly concerned about the state of public transport in the UK. I've been a long term user of buses, while I would normally cycle to work, if the weather was very bad, e.g. widespread black ice, I would take the bus. Once retired, and with a free bus pass, we use the buses for shopping and for getting around locally. There was an excellent service, I can't recall being let down by the bus. Come Brexit and a shortage of lorry drivers haulage firms were forced to up drivers wages and some bus drivers were tempted to switch. Then came Covid with far fewer people travelling and drivers at risk. Move to the present and we have a reduced bus service operating and a spate of cancellations. 

 

Yesterday we had a pleasant day out using bus and train to visit a local beach resort. Getting there was no problem, but coming back our train had been cancelled due to technical problems so we had to wait for the next one. Then we boarded a bus only to find that the previous one had not turned up so ours was jammed full. Given the circumstances I think that the driver allowed more people to travel than regulations allow.

 

Now, as a retired person, this is a minor inconvenience for me, but for working people who rely on public transport to get to their place of work this is a major problem. It needs to be sorted but I have heard no mention of it in the recent political debates.

 

We have a similar situation here with the subways. Ghastly crime problem that has had a lot of press attention the last two years. They are now estimating that a third of riders are never coming back and that will make a big financial shortfall. The subway was always my favorite way to get around but not anymore. If I can take a bus I take a bus. NYC is coming back, but slowly and in bits and pieces. The west side of Washington Square Park has become a needle park. A big change from five years ago when we were one of the safest cities in the world.

 

Paulette

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The world has changed, and not for the better. The worst of it is once the change has been around for a while, it becomes the new normal, and seldom reverts to the old normal. I see the changes everywhere, including simple things like the downsizing of food container/packaging. So many recipes are based on a can of….(or a package of) and those cans of….are reduced now. One day there will be a tiny plastic shrink wrap container offering one green bean.

Not everyone can plant a garden.

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My hot water tank went out yesterday. Leaked a big puddle, but on concrete in basement so all ok there. My son turned off the water to it and the puddle is almost gone this morning.

The plumber came out at 8:15 this morning. 🥱 so I was up at 6 to read the newspaper and have my coffee. There are shortages, so the plumber will try to find what size I need tomorrow.

No hot water...have to heat some on the cook stove. I can get by without a shower today, but will have to go to my son’s or daughter’s tomorrow if I don’t get a tank installed tomorrow.

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5 hours ago, Michael Ventura said:

 

Same but coffee and the newspaper first!

Me, too. While I’m reading and sipping my second cup, I have Echo’s vegetables steaming in the microwave. When I finish the paper, I feed her and hit the shower.

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Should probably be in good thing, but the plumber is here finally and getting ready to drain the tank before removal. Hopefully I’ll have hot water before the day is done. Probably why this belongs in “Bad Thing” is that it will cost me $$$$. Ouch. 

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Should probably be in good thing, but the plumber is here finally and getting ready to drain the tank before removal. Hopefully I’ll have hot water before the day is done. Probably why this belongs in “Bad Thing” is that it will cost me $$$$. Ouch. 

 

HOW MUCH!   That is a hell of a lot. Plumbers are expensive here too but some are not so expensive. Hot water cylinder from £200 to £400 ($245 to $500) Should come in at £500 to £700 including labour.

 

Allan

 

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40 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

 

HOW MUCH!   That is a hell of a lot. Plumbers are expensive here too but some are not so expensive. Hot water cylinder from £200 to £400 ($245 to $500) Should come in at £500 to £700 including labour.

 

Allan

 

 

Yep, home maintenance repair specialists are very expensive here.  Most jobs start at $250 just to ring your doorbell and then it goes up up up from there!

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20 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

HOW MUCH!   That is a hell of a lot. Plumbers are expensive here too but some are not so expensive. Hot water cylinder from £200 to £400 ($245 to $500) Should come in at £500 to £700 including labour.

 

Allan

 

I haven’t got the bill, yet. It is a 50 gallon gas tank. They moved it over about a foot further away from the central heating unit so it would be easier to work on in the future. That required a lot of new piping and metal bits. Installed a new shutoff valve. I expect it will be in the range of around $1400. I’m a bit miffed because they didn’t ask me if it was ok to move it, they just did it. It’s been in that original spot since the house was built, so I really can’t see why it couldn’t have stayed there. I expect it was their way to pad the bill. It should have been around $1000.

But that is what senior widows have to put up with, being taken advantage of. I recently went through discussions with my lawn sprinkler company who double charged me for labor. He refused to give in, so I’ll be looking for a new company.

Then my lawn guy who mows uses a big heavy riding mower. The first 2 years he had a smaller one and everything was good. After he bought the big one, he kept breaking sprinkler heads, the same ones near the driveway. So I had to call the sprinkler guy and got double charged to replace them.

When I asked my lawn guy, very nicely, if he couldn’t push mow that area (would take about 3-5 minutes) because his mower was breaking the heads, he denied it was his mower doing it and told me to find someone else since I was unhappy. I had a week to scramble & find someone before the grass got out of hand. I now have two teen brothers who push mow it and do a great job.

The lawn guy had charged me $30 a week each mowing, but after he told me to find someone else, he stuck a 2 month bill in my mailbox. It should have still been the $30 a mowing, but he charged me $35 each, an extra $40, just because he was pi**ed. Of course, I was never notified 2 months ago of a price change which is part of doing business.

I paid it without comment while gritting my teeth. Every since my husband got very ill, then died and I have to deal with everything, I have been either bullied or taken advantage of. I can’t understand why men do that. But I will say this, two men that did repairs or replacements went out of their way to not take advantage and were very reasonable in their charges. The other (less than stellar) men acted like they weren’t working for me, the customer, and all the say-so was theirs.
I hate confrontations. I’ve always been soft and the peacemaker in my family, and in work or any other situation, ran from confrontation. So it’s hard for me to stand up for myself and the advantage-takers can smell the blood in the water.

By this, I can tell who are good husbands and sons, and who fail.

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