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Thank you for that. A friend asked me yesterday about why they call it Boxing Day. I couldn't remember and I have just emailed her the answer. I sometimes get more from the Forum than I do from Google.

 

Paulette

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The pheasant was great. Only one piece of shot and OH got it;)

A bottle of '10 claret then Cadillac with the cheese was quite enough. Zoom with the generations later on. Beautiful Granddaughter had done a first Nativity with the cuddly toys and a tea towel on her head of course but that was hours before us, in NZ.

Edited by spacecadet
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8 hours ago, Bryan said:

The 30 years of Have I Got News For You was also a good watch. The wonders of catch up TV. 

 


Excellent programme. Fascinating to see the Bojo bumbling away and making a total mess of hosting. Nothing has changed. Long may it continue - the programme not the bumbling Bojo. 

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9 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

The pheasant was great. Only one piece of shot and OH got it;)

A bottle of '10 claret then Cadillac with the cheese was quite enough. Zoom with the generations later on. Beautiful Granddaughter had done a first Nativity with the cuddly toys and a tea towel on her head of course but that was hours before us, in NZ.

 

My girlfriend in Oxfordshire used to cook pheasant for me, freeze a few lovely dinners for me, before she went off to spend a dutiful Christmas with family in Newcastle. 

 

I did Indian from M&S yesterday. Pasta and Italian red today. 

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Boxing Day is known as St Stephen’s Day in Ireland. St Stephen got stoned to death (literally). As a young man I used to try to follow in his footsteps (figuratively) over Christmas. Now a glass or two of good red wine is more than enough. 

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On 26/12/2020 at 12:30, MDM said:

Boxing Day is known as St Stephen’s Day in Ireland. St Stephen got stoned to death (literally). As a young man I used to try to follow in his footsteps (figuratively) over Christmas. Now a glass or two of good red wine is more than enough. 

 

I'll go along with that thought, Michael. Yes, I knew about Saint Stephen's Day, being a curious Yank, an Irish person, and a resident of the new UK. I have affection and regard for all these places and their traditions. I'm grateful to the UK for taking me in and giving me the use of their NHS. I'm grateful to the Irish Republic for allowing me to be a citizen. And as a native-born American, I would fight invaders on our borders with my Swiss Army knife, but I would never venture abroad to fight Communism in far off lands. I learned that lesson in Vietnam. We were the best recruiting program for the VC there ever was. I support a united Ireland, but I don't support the IRA. They almost killed me in '82 in Regents Park. I was photographing the band stand 10 mins before it was bombed. And they killed 7 Irish horses that same day. In Saigon in the VC bombed my go-to pub/bistro. I will never forgive them for that. You don't kill civilians on the way home after a days work. That's evil.

 

I'm sorry. I'm a little drunk.

 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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9 hours ago, ReeRay said:

Not a fighting day Ed The name comes from a time when the rich used to box up gifts to give to the poor. Boxing Day was traditionally a day off for servants, and the day when they received a special Christmas box from their masters. The servants would also go home on Boxing Day to give Christmas boxes to their families.

 

British friend explained that the servants generally worked the family's Christmas Eve and Christmas day dinners and were quite fagged (in the British sense) by the end of the Christmas parties and dinner.  So they had the day after off with gifts.   Custom here is half day off Christmas eve and all of Christmas day, and one month's salary as a bonus around the first of December, mandatory if a regular employee registered with INSS (local medical and old age pension insurance), customary for casual employees .   My helper came today to walk with me to the bank (I'm on a cane at this point), walk the dog and get breakfast, then go shopping at La Colonia for frozen peas, a dark locally made stout (one bottle), and other things.

 

Did a FaceTime call with my niece yesterday and she mentioned that a lot of Hispanics were moving into Charlotte, North Carolina, and their Anglo neighbors were complaining in a neighborhood FB group about the noise.  Just an audible reminder that the US is becoming a different place in fifty years.

 

A friend asked me if the Old Men of the Year this year would be wearing masks before they burned.   I'll have to check. 

Edited by MizBrown
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15 minutes ago, Michael Ventura said:

What do people do now on Boxing Day? Besides rest.  Are there any traditions still followed?

 

In England there is a long tradition of football (soccer) on Boxing Day and onwards through the New Year. I've gone to London a few times on Boxing Day but it is a long haul as there are no trains so it means driving. This year because of the pandemic, there are very few games in front of fans - the only ones with fans in the top division (English Premier League) are in Liverpool where 2000 fans are allowed. All of the games at the moment are televised. 

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1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

You mean besides drinking too much wine?

You'll be pleased to learn that I passed on the port and stilton this evening Edo, it was a severe temptation, but I held out. Should I pass away overnight I shall regret that decision.

 

But the good news, I took delivery of this year's seed order today, a promise of things to grow in the months ahead. Not yet opened the package, I'll save that pleasure until tomorrow.

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I love stilton and port, but it never loved me back. It was a sure path to a migraine. And today was the first time I drank too much in at least a dozen years. 

 

Is it windy up there, Bryan? 

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12 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

I lived 28 years in the UK and never knew. Shame on me for not being more curious. So thank you for posting ReeRay.

 

interesting.  I live in Canada and i knew, but i would tell people it came from habit of people fighting over left over food on offer the day after Christmas, in early 20th century in Manchester.  

I guess people here are willing to accept anything that make Mancunians look like brutes. 

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6 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I love stilton and port, but it never loved me back. It was a sure path to a migraine. And today was the first time I drank too much in at least a dozen years. 

 

Is it windy up there, Bryan? 

 

I'd like to think that the last time I had too much to drink was when I was a student, but it's probably not true. However we normally ration ourselves to a single glass of wine these days with a few alcohol free days between bottles. One of my gardening friends gave me 2 bottles of expensive wine as a thanks for help over the year, the temptation is there, but it's nicer to be able to share the stuff in good company. Bring on the vaccine.

 

It's a tad draughty Edo, but we have the Pennines between us and the source of the storm, so not as bad as elsewhere. Happily the rain is falling wet, prefer not to have to deal with snow, despite the photo opportunities.

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29 minutes ago, Bryan said:

It's a tad draughty Edo, but we have the Pennines between us and the source of the storm, so not as bad as elsewhere. Happily the rain is falling wet, prefer not to have to deal with snow, despite the photo opportunities.

 

I'm looking forward to the snow that's forecast here for Monday morning, will wait until then to see where it falls, and if it does. Will likely either gain height in the Chilterns or head a little way north. I remember long ago listening to the weather and traffic reports for where the snow fall would be heavy and leaving home in the early hours for the Ogwen Valley. Walking in thick snow then suddenly into a hidden dip and snow up to my knees was a wonderful experience. Those days are now likely over, locally snow is rare and never that heavy.

Edited by sb photos
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7 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

I'm looking forward to the snow that's forecast here for Monday morning, will wait until then to see where it falls, and if it does. Will likely either gain height in the Chilterns or head a little way north. I remember long ago listening to the weather and traffic reports for where the snow fall would be heavy and leaving home in the early hours for the Ogwen Valley. Walking in thick snow then suddenly into a hidden dip and snow up to my knees was a wonderful experience. Those days are now likely over, locally snow is rare and never that heavy.

Looking forward to some snow here also, at the moment my phone is saying a 40% chance so trying not to get my hopes up too much though have put my snow boots on standby.....meanwhile it's a nice day today so will probably go for a walk around the flooded V Park😁

 

Carol

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After a very wet and windy night with storm Bella today is bright and sunny so we’ve been for a walk. We’ve been exploring local villages that we don’t know so today we walked from Marsh Baldon to Toot Baldon and back. Sat awhile on a bench outside the 13century church with wonderful views out across South Oxfordshire. Home for a bacon sandwich! 

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During lockdown we've been searching for TV programmes that are mutually acceptable and easy on the brain, stuff to watch while eating. One such series involves the architect George Clarke, (a pleasant local lad) who advises couples on renovation projects on their houses. George is an affable if slightly OTT character who gets to kiss all of the women. 

 

However a few things emerge from these shows: -

 

1) It appears that whenever an architect provides an estimate, you can happily add at least 50% in order to reach a more realistic figure.

 

2) Kitchen users beware, he will knock down all of the walls he can in an effort to make your living area open plan and the kitchen occupy  as much space as possible

 

3) Your kitchen may well end up with an island unit with a projecting top just at the right height to poke out a young child's eye.

 

Personally, when I cook, I prefer to be alone, or at best accompanied by the radio. I can't see any merit in having noise transmitted between the rooms. I don't want to hear the TV in the lounge when working in the kitchen. We have a galley kitchen, something that would appal George and apparently all of the people on the show. However, it's an incredibly efficient use of space, two strides will take you to any of the working surfaces or storage places.  Chefs working in trains, on ships and even nuclear submarines, cater for the masses from smaller kitchens than I possess.

 

May be an age thing, but I just don't get it 🙃

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21 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I love stilton and port, but it never loved me back. It was a sure path to a migraine. And today was the first time I drank too much in at least a dozen years. 

 

 

Yesterday was the first time I drank too much in a dozen hours.

We had Cadillac with the cheese, Ed. Sauternes, Monbazillac or whatever would have done as well. OH did one of those dinky little plates of three varieties you pay about £15 for at fancy restaurants......but on a plate, not a roof tile.

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16 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

Yesterday was the first time I drank too much in a dozen hours.

We had Cadillac with the cheese, Ed. Sauternes, Monbazillac or whatever would have done as well. OH did one of those dinky little plates of three varieties you pay about £15 for at fancy restaurants......but on a plate, not a roof tile.

 

Must admit I had to look up Cadillac, even though we’re dessert wine lovers I don’t know that one. Best one we’ve ever had was  called Chateau Filhot, a rather nice Sauternes!

I’m just enjoying a glass of a chilled Viognier from Aldi which is a very reasonable £5.49 while I teach Ian to make smoked haddock chowder. 

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1 minute ago, Thyrsis said:

Must admit I had to look up Cadillac

A nice one we picked up in Toulouse. With that name it was bought to be drunk with No. 1 son, the petrolhead who has a Maserati, but he's in Beverley and we couldn't wait.🤩

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All this talk of cheeses and dessert wines settled it for me. I'm having lunch out tomorrow. I'll go to the nearby Queens Wine Bar and Bistro, where they always make me feel welcome dining alone. The owner has an Italian greyhound puppy who seems to understand my Romano chatter. 

 

The lockdown here has lightened to Tier 2, so we can shop, eat out both inside and out, and kiss strangers in the street. London is now Tier 4, so it's against the law to look out your window. 

 

Mark, what good is a Maserati if it doesn't get you there on time? 

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