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I’ve been uploading my better photographs to major stock agencies for a little over a year. I’ve had good success with Shutterstock, iStock, and Adobe Stock (more than 260 sales of so far). However, I’ve had ZERO sales from Alamy. What’s up?  I not expecting to generate a huge number of sales from Alamy, but nothing at all!  Have other contributors experienced similar results?

Jerry

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If they are the same images, well, why should people buy them here when they can get them cheaper elsewhere?

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46 minutes ago, Mr Standfast said:

If they are the same images, well, why should people buy them here when they can get them cheaper elsewhere?

This. 

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, JGantar said:

I’ve been uploading my better photographs to major stock agencies for a little over a year. I’ve had good success with Shutterstock, iStock, and Adobe Stock (more than 260 sales of so far). However, I’ve had ZERO sales from Alamy. What’s up?  I not expecting to generate a huge number of sales from Alamy, but nothing at all!  Have other contributors experienced similar results?

Jerry

There are 255,000 million images on Alamy, 123 of them are yours. How on earth can you expect them to sell! Be realistic. 

You need at least 1000 images to get 1 sale a month.

Sorry to say this but yes, many other new contributors will experience similar results.

 

EDIT: Sorry if that was a bit harsh, I’d had a bad day! Your images are very good and I’m sure they will sell in the right place. 🙂

Edited by Thyrsis
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Many microstock photographers have thrown their images on Alamy without looking to see what Alamy really does, which is primarily editorial. Many new contributors have had the same experience as you relate. Some give up on Alamy and go back to selling on microstock, some readjust their sights and produce the kind of work Alamy  excels in to see if it will work for them.

 

You may well eventually sell some of the images you have uploaded to date, and probably get a better price than you would on microstock, but you need to adjust your expectations on the numbers you will sell. A good rule of thumb is one sale per month per 1000 images in your portfolio, but that is a rule of thumb for a typical Alamy portfolio. For a portfolio which is mostly images easily found on other agencies the rate of sales here is going to be much lower.

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With 123 pictures here you can't make a hole in the world. I recommend more work. When I enter my archive, I will also produce 123 photos in two days. You can't move anywhere in stock photography without everyday hard work. So far, you seem to consider stock photography as a hobby for Sunday afternoon.

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very nice photographs, all 123 of them. But, as has been said, why would anyone buy them here on Alamy when it seems, they can buy them cheaper elsewhere? Buyers really do compare sites. Even if you made the suggested mark of 1000, if they are all available on microstock sites you would be really lucky to get any sales here

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Wanting to thank everyone who responded to my initial post regarding lack of sales on Alamy…your comments and suggestions are appreciated. Although I thoroughly enjoy landscape and nature photography, apparently these kinds of images sell much better on Shutterstock, iStock, or Adobe.

 

At this point in my life (turned 80 two months ago), I can’t produce enough good images to generate sales on Alamy. For me, photography remains a wonderful HOBBY that has given me much joy and satisfaction. Stock agencies provide an outlet for sharing my work with an international audience…while making a few dollars for the effort.

Jerry

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Very nice images and well-captioned (a rarity with MS photos). My guess is that you will see some sales here, but it could take awhile. The problem, as others have mentioned, is that the cat is probably out of the bag, so to speak. Photo-buyers must now realize that a lot of microstock contributors are uploading their RF collections to Alamy, so all they have to do is run to their favourite MS agency when they see an image here that they like. Best of luck.

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You need patience with Alamy, I've found as a contributor its still imagery which stands out similar to cinematography which sells for good money, it took about 18 months to receive the first sale, it can still be an enjoyable experience without sales using the interface. I was interested to find out Corbis was started by Bill Gates with Microsoft.

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Your images are beautiful. As others have said, it takes many more here to do well and your subjects are not unusual. Look at the "Images Sold" thread to see what is selling here. Don't put images here that can be bought for pennies elsewhere.

 

Paulette

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11 hours ago, JGantar said:

For me, photography remains a wonderful HOBBY that has given me much joy and satisfaction. Stock agencies provide an outlet for sharing my work with an international audience…while making a few dollars for the effort.

Jerry

 

 

wouldn't a print on demand service be a better place for that.  The little i still do with the large MS, i do not see anyone Seeing my work, to me it purely looks as a utilitarian function.  Image is used to illustrate a matter than forgotten about.     

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20 hours ago, Thyrsis said:

There are 255,000 million images on Alamy, 123 of them are yours. How on earth can you expect them to sell! Be realistic. 

You need at least 1000 images to get 1 sale a month.

Sorry to say this but yes, many other new contributors will experience similar results.

 

EDIT: Sorry if that was a bit harsh, I’d had a bad day! Your images are very good and I’m sure they will sell in the right place. 🙂

 

Hello,

I have more than 5000 images, exclusive to Alamy and only 2 sales. Why? 1000 images and 1 sale for month? I would like see that!

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17 hours ago, JGantar said:

Wanting to thank everyone who responded to my initial post regarding lack of sales on Alamy…your comments and suggestions are appreciated. Although I thoroughly enjoy landscape and nature photography, apparently these kinds of images sell much better on Shutterstock, iStock, or Adobe.

 

At this point in my life (turned 80 two months ago), I can’t produce enough good images to generate sales on Alamy. For me, photography remains a wonderful HOBBY that has given me much joy and satisfaction. Stock agencies provide an outlet for sharing my work with an international audience…while making a few dollars for the effort.

Jerry

I've been biting my lip before posting this. Don't take this too personally, I'm trying to generalize. You say  "For me, photography remains a wonderful HOBBY that has given me much joy and satisfaction. Stock agencies provide an outlet for sharing my work with an international audience…while making a few dollars for the effort."

 

I'm sorry but isn't that the problem? Look, you're 80 years old. You don't need the few dollars you earn from photography,  it's a pastime for you. There has been an industry wide assault on the livelihood of working professionals directly caused by hobbyists who desire "joy and satisfaction" Could not joy and satisfaction be achieved by posting images on a blog, photo forums or sharing them with friends and family, not with agencies? Sure, the microstock agencies are the ones who recognized this vanity and tempted you with the warm dulcet promises of being told that "I am a published photographer, I have merit." Their deviousness worked perfectly but contributors must share some responsibility as well. Think about the damage being done to an entire profession. I am an excellent baker. I bake at home. If I were to set up a stand outside my local bakery selling baguettes at 25 cents a loaf for the satisfaction of sharing my skill with every passerby, I think the store owner would take a baseball bat to my head. And I would deserve it. 

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On 08/06/2021 at 19:06, JGantar said:

I’ve been uploading my better photographs to major stock agencies for a little over a year. I’ve had good success with Shutterstock, iStock, and Adobe Stock (more than 260 sales of so far). However, I’ve had ZERO sales from Alamy. What’s up?  I not expecting to generate a huge number of sales from Alamy, but nothing at all!  Have other contributors experienced similar results?

Jerry

 

Jerry, you may have caught the forum when it is at it's grumpiest.  I had been contributing about a 100 images a month for seven months before I made my first sale. then bingo, two on the same day.  Some experience quicker returns than that, some worse. Image buyers shop around, if they can find the same image for less, weel what would you do? As a hobby, Alamy is a bit rubbish. If however you treat it as a hobby business, there are modest returns. The effort to reward ratio was always poor, for the smaller contributor it's getting worse.

 

Stay safe.

 

James

 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, formerly snappyoncalifornia said:

I've been biting my lip before posting this. Don't take this too personally, I'm trying to generalize. You say  "For me, photography remains a wonderful HOBBY that has given me much joy and satisfaction. Stock agencies provide an outlet for sharing my work with an international audience…while making a few dollars for the effort."

 

I'm sorry but isn't that the problem? Look, you're 80 years old. You don't need the few dollars you earn from photography,  it's a pastime for you. There has been an industry wide assault on the livelihood of working professionals directly caused by hobbyists who desire "joy and satisfaction" Could not joy and satisfaction be achieved by posting images on a blog, photo forums or sharing them with friends and family, not with agencies? Sure, the microstock agencies are the ones who recognized this vanity and tempted you with the warm dulcet promises of being told that "I am a published photographer, I have merit." Their deviousness worked perfectly but contributors must share some responsibility as well. Think about the damage being done to an entire profession. I am an excellent baker. I bake at home. If I were to set up a stand outside my local bakery selling baguettes at 25 cents a loaf for the satisfaction of sharing my skill with every passerby, I think the store owner would take a baseball bat to my head. And I would deserve it. 

I could not have put it better! As a professional photographer who has also just hit 80, I am exasperated to find myself and many others competing against hobbyists who are delighted by being published as the goal with perhaps a few dollars thrown in. Micro sites and Getty have destroyed most of the photography business and are daily becoming more brazen and grasping in their approach to photographers. They make money and pay their executives well, and buy and sell their operations for huge fees. The photographers are paid less and less

Edited by Robert M Estall
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13 minutes ago, Robert M Estall said:

 Micro sites and Getty have destroyed most of the photography business and are daily becoming more brazen and grasping in their approach to photographers. They make money and pay their executives well, and buy and sell their operations for huge fees. The photographers are paid less and less

 

yeah the latest one: "Get $5 for an image that we will put in our "free collection" and let everyone download as many times as they want in 12 months". 

 

 sigh!

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If you just want people to admire your work, there are a number of sites that simply display it (Flickr, the photography part of Facebook, Smugmug, and various other places, and you can collect likes from people who have actually seen your photos (and who may want you to like them back).  You can post some places and ask for feedback.   I feel like I'm between fish and foul (fowl) with this since I wanted photography to be a supplemental income, but also realized that working to produce license-able photos might ruin a pleasant hobby.   Flowers and landscapes are a hard sell because everyone likes taking them, as opposed to everyone not wanting to shoot fashion, product photography, or combat.

 

I'm resigning for now from Alamy, may rethink this in a year. 

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On 08/06/2021 at 23:05, Robert M Estall said:

 But, as has been said, why would anyone buy them here on Alamy when it seems, they can buy them cheaper elsewhere? Buyers really do compare sites. Even if you made the suggested mark of 1000, if they are all available on microstock sites you would be really lucky to get any sales here

 

Because some people will check while other people are lazy, particularly if they have a tight deadline or work for a company that has a 'special dal' with Alamy or some sort of a company policy. And a lot if time, it's not ;their' money they are spending.. it's the companies money.. so they might not care quite as much as if it was their money.

 

I think the real issue is, that these are the kind of images that Alamy tend to sell. You are far more likely to sell a picture of a close down shop on Slough Hiugh Street than a pretty picture of flowers or pumpkins.

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Matt, if you count on clients who don't shop competitively and are content to spend money carelessly you will miss the bus most of time. I grant you, there are a lot of pumpkins and flowers to compete with. Few sales prospects there and It surely is a long time since I've sold Niagara Falls or Stonehenge. But I didn't get into photography to shoot closed up shops, Slough or anywhere else. Slough has enough negativity without my piling on the grief. Architecture is constantly evolving though it's surprising how many clients are happy with shots which could do with some updating. In a sane world these landmark pix ought to have about a five year life and then archival from perhaps 50 years + but it doesn't seem to work that way. Some do manage to find subjects which are undersubscribed, but this may prove unhelpful if the demand is completely absent. I have a couple of small sets which nobody else has covered and even sold one this month (but low ££) and two more of them zoomed yesterday If Bill Brooks does pull his portfolio(don't go Bill!), I'll have another unique set. In both cases, the sites are now closed to new photography. Good trick if you can find one. I also have a nice shot of a fine building which burned to the ground a few weeks after my visit which have sold well. Complete coincidence officer, I promise!

Edited by Robert M Estall
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On 08/06/2021 at 19:06, JGantar said:

I’ve been uploading my better photographs to major stock agencies for a little over a year. I’ve had good success with Shutterstock, iStock, and Adobe Stock (more than 260 sales of so far). However, I’ve had ZERO sales from Alamy. What’s up?  I not expecting to generate a huge number of sales from Alamy, but nothing at all!  Have other contributors experienced similar results?

Jerry

I had over 800 files up on Alamy before I had my first sale, and that was over ten years ago when the collection was much smaller. (I had one sale on my micro two days after my first six files went live. Although it was a small amount, I was excitedly doing sums on the back of an envelope - ha!) You're a tiny fish in a large ocean (as am I!).

Also in general people sell more and make more on micros. I've only ever heard two people say otherwise, one had well over 10K files here and literally <20 on one micro; the other posted on a different forum that s/he made more on Alamy than any of their micros. As they post under a pseudonym, I asked if they could share the relative numbers on each platform: that was over two weeks ago and they have chosen not to do so, which is their right, but leads me to think that possibly it's a similar situation.

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As for me,


In general, I would recommend Alamy to be more vigilant against hobby photographers migrating from the SS

who think - that there is a perfect repository for their toxic photos.

 

I'm in favor of a tougher approach to "festive" photohobbies.
I would easily increase the $ 250 per year limit.

 

Those who are sincere with the Alamas and working on themselves,
they will certainly achieve higher sales during the year.
Alamy is primarily a space for the sale of photos.
If you want to sell, you're in the right place.
But something needs to be done to do it.
A year is a long time to find out what is needed.

 

So know.
Maybe I'll repeat myself,
but without regular daily hard work
no progress can be expected. Upload photos, upload photos

and upload photos, it can't be done without it.
Happiness and talent is a bonus.

 

In a year you will find out what works and what doesn't.
I keep my fingers crossed for these people

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On 09/06/2021 at 23:41, Mr Standfast said:

 

 

Jerry, you may have caught the forum when it is at it's grumpiest.  I had been contributing about a 100 images a month for seven months before I made my first sale. then bingo, two on the same day.  Some experience quicker returns than that, some worse. Image buyers shop around, if they can find the same image for less, weel what would you do? As a hobby, Alamy is a bit rubbish. If however you treat it as a hobby business, there are modest returns. The effort to reward ratio was always poor, for the smaller contributor it's getting worse.

 

Stay safe.

 

James

 

Yes. What kind of danger we can find in 123 images?

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Images of flowers are hard to sell. Flowers may be the most photographed subject of all. If you buy a new camera or lens, you will often test it with flowers and beautiful flowers often give good photos. Just type some of your keywords into the image search of Alamy to see on which page your photos are. Most buyers will buy a photo from the first page. If your photo is on page 10, it has a low chance of ever being sold.

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Skyscraperfan, followed your suggestion and searched Alamy using the keywords, “daylily + closeup”. Six of my photographs appeared on page 1. Maybe that’s a hopeful sign.

Also, after looking at dozens of Alamy stock photographs of daylilies, in my judgement, a high percentage of them are just awful -- distracting background, poor composition, too much contrast, lack of sharpness... Can’t understand how they were ever accepted. I regularly discard these kinds of images -- would never consider submitting this kind of stuff to ANY stock agency. Someone searching Alamy looking for a really good photograph of a daylily (or some other flower), might be turned off by the poor quality of so many images.

 

Jerry

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