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Ten years ago I hosted a blog on Google called Mulberry Street. My life on Mulberry Street and that blog about it are no more. The blog has fallen into disrepair. http://edoruan2.blogspot.com

 

I'm thinking about hosting a new blog focusing on my life here in Liverpool and the UK. As before, I plan to mix restaurant reviews with essays and memoirs. Although I'm not doing this to earn money, I do want to attract a following and pick the best site to do this. Any thoughts? 

 

Will I be teaching the intricacies of digital photography? hahahahahahahahahahaha! No. 

 

Edo

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Wordpress, easy to use but I found hard to keep going after initial burst of enthusiasm. That's happened a couple of times now.

 

I paid to have the version without adverts ( £25? per annum or so). I thought, mistakenly, that paying would motivate. It did for a bit.

 

Very simple to use at a very simple level.. 

 

I'm sure yours will be more interesting Edo with all your thoughts about Liverpool.

 

https://blog.geographyphotos.com

Edited by geogphotos
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7 minutes ago, Harry Harrison said:

Yes, Photoshelter also works with Wordpress. but only Wordpress.org, not Wordpress.com.

 

 

Not really sure what you mean Harry but mine is with Wordpress.com

 

The 'org' Wordpress is too hard for me.

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16 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

Not really sure what you mean Harry but mine is with Wordpress.com

 

It was from this video, 20m 27s in. She specifically says that they can only pull in Tumblr or Wordpress.org blog posts, however that just means that they can't pull the blog posts into their responsive template so that it matches the rest of the site, must be a technical difference between Wordpress.org & Wordpress.com. Not relevant to Ed at all!

 

https://support.photoshelter.com/hc/en-us/articles/203375000-PhotoShelter-101

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25 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

Good luck with the blog, Edo. My blog is essential reading for, oh, at least half a dozen people. I started it when I was a campervan nomad, and the habit seems to have stuck…

 

YIKES, John! You do a daily blog? I've been thinking that a weekly blog might be too often. But then a monthly is pointless. Mulberry Street was monthly but that was because eating out was too expensive to do weekly. When I lived in Oxfordshire, I did a weekly spot on BBC Radio Oxford, and that was around 3,000 words. Well, I was younger. 

 

I'm wondering if every two weeks would work? A fortnight (something I've never heard an American say). This is scary.

 

Ian, I had a major block when trying to write a thriller. On three different attempts on three plots I got to 100 pages and could go no furture. 

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Edo... I'm more of a writer than a photographer, and writing a few words for the blog represents a good way to 'get my writing head on'. Also, if you - or I - fail to meet a blogging 'deadline', I'm happy to say that no one in the known universe will care a jot!

 

Just write when you feel like it. No pressure... 😀

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24 minutes ago, John Morrison said:

Edo... I'm more of a writer than a photographer, and writing a few words for the blog represents a good way to 'get my writing head on'. Also, if you - or I - fail to meet a blogging 'deadline', I'm happy to say that no one in the known universe will care a jot!

 

Just write when you feel like it. No pressure... 😀

 

I've started a few blogs in the past for the same reason. I only updated them when inspiration struck, which wasn't all that often. As a result, they all fizzled and I ended up talking to myself. However, it was fun while it lasted, plus I came to realize that I'm not cut out for the age of relentless self-promotion (on FB, Twitter, etc.), which is a big relief.  🙃

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It seems fate has taken a hand here. I'm still hocked up at blogspot.com, where I was doing my blogs. It's free and I'll give it a go. I had over 600 readers at one point. I can't imagine how that happened. Successful pro bloggers, I assume, have many thousands of followers. 

 

Will it be weekly? Maybe so. I need a schedule and a format. Finding a good restaurant every week here in Liverpool ain't gonna be easy. I can dis one if it's terrible but not if it's just ho hum. That seems unfair. Hey . . . maybe I will not review (comment on) just restaurants and pubs. How about museums and stores and other tourist attractions? 

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A lot of us have been following your interesting life story here Edo, so why not blog?

 

I have, or had, two blogs, but lost the ownership of the first one when Google changed the parameters or I changed my email address or some combination of these events. It's still out there in the ether, but I can't access it, a phantom blog. My contributions are singularly intermittent, don't see why you need to feed the thing daily or weekly, unless I guess it is monetised (horrible word).

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I've had several blogs with blogspot.com and have been happy with them for the most part. I even bought a domain name (not sure you can still do that now) for a travel blog that I maintained for several years via blogspot. It's still out there somewhere in cyberspace. I tried monetizing it with various ads but never made any money to speak of.  

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12 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

Ten years ago I hosted a blog on Google called Mulberry Street. My life on Mulberry Street and that blog about it are no more. The blog has fallen into disrepair. http://edoruan2.blogspot.com

 

I'm thinking about hosting a new blog focusing on my life here in Liverpool and the UK. As before, I plan to mix restaurant reviews with essays and memoirs. Although I'm not doing this to earn money, I do want to attract a following and pick the best site to do this. Any thoughts? 

 

Will I be teaching the intricacies of digital photography? hahahahahahahahahahaha! No. 

 

Edo

Edo,

 

Just read your 'Moving On' blog and enjoyed it tremendously.  Your really should start doing a Blog again, count me in

to read it.

 

Chuck

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13 hours ago, geogphotos said:

 

Wordpress, easy to use but I found hard to keep going after initial burst of enthusiasm. That's happened a couple of times now.

 

 

Yep, that's me to a tee. My travel photo blog lasted two posts in 2009, my more general blog five posts in 2013-14. I even made it easier to do by writing the blog code myself so that I could compose the posts at my leisure on my desktop and just email them to the site, but that didn't help.

 

Alan

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All your thoughts are encouraging. Thank you, all. 

 

I've seen you on YouTube, Lisa, and liked your videos. The way you do them, I mean. Didn't know you also had a blogspot blog. 

 

As soon as I have coffee and wake up, I think about this. zzzzzzzzzzzzz

 

Edo of Liverpool (for now)

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I've had a simple wordpress.com blog for a good few years now, posting very occasionally as  Alex Ramsay Photography - which was reasonably popular among my friends and acquaintances, who liked the pictures, until I started going in for political rants (with fewer pics) about a certain shameful episode in this country's recent history. I think I shall start posting again soon, but staying (largely) off politics and concentrating on pictures.

 

Alex

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Charming images, Lisa, but that's not really a blog. It's several sets of theme portfolios. 

 

I'm not sure how to post a link to a specific blog of mine here. I'll copy and paste one that I did in Paris.

 

 

Paris Pub Crawl
 
 
“Can I get a glass of Sancerre, please?” I asked the bartender at Harry’s New York Bar in Paris. That’s the full, correct name of the place, but, like Harry’s Bar in Venice, it’s usually referred to simply as Harry’s Bar. Harry’s Bar in Venice belongs to the Cipriani international conglomerate now and looks out on the Grand Canal. But it’s very easy to tell them apart: one is in Venice and the other one is in Paris.
 
A cool glass of Mascat dessert wine. Stock Photo
 
Immediately I thought I should have said, “May I have a glass of Sancerre,” or should I have said it in French, perhaps? Could I have said it in French? Maybe not, but I know how to pronounce Sancerre. Okay, I admit it. Paris makes me nervous. It always has. The French make me nervous. 
 
The bartender turned out to be a very nice, soft-spoken young man with perfect English. And since I seemed to be the only customer in the bar that afternoon, he was able to give me his complete attention. And what he told me first was, “We are an American bar, sir. We do not serve wine.” There was no attempt at one-upmanship, no Gallic putdown of any kind—just information.
 
“No wine?”
 
“Only spirits, sir.”
 
I was trying to think of a bar in America that served no wine, but I could not. Maybe the one out in Deadwood, South Dakota, where Wild Bill Hickok was shot in the back by Jack McCall.
 
“A double Jim Beam with one lump of ice, please,” I told him. The first sip tasted very . . . well . . . not at all French. I should have had a Bloody Mary. This was, after all, where that concoction was invented.
 
The walls of the back room of Harry’s were a poisonous yellow-brown, possibly from decades of heavy cigarette smoking or a clever mix of paints by some romantically minded decorator. Framed and faded photographs covered the walls. Somewhere on the premises was supposed to be the piano George Gershwin used to compose "An American in Paris."
 
After Harry’s Bar, I had just one more spot, just one more drink, in order to complete the circle of Ernest Hemingway’s main watering holes. I’d already visited a lot of his other spots in Paris—Le Select, Le Dome, Deux Magots. They wouldn’t let me into the Bar Hemingway at the Ritz. I'm not sure why. Maybe I had too many cameras hanging on me.
 
I’ve had a few glasses of Valpolicella at the Gritti Palace in Venice, Sherry and Rioja at Botin in Madrid, and something at that silly tourist trap in Key West. The only obligatory spot left for me to visit is La Floridita in Havana, Cuba for a daiquiri. I suppose I’ll have to have a mojito at the Bodeguita del Medio, as well.
 

 

Does the present generation of young writers and readers still retrace the steps of Hemingway and Fitzgerald and Joyce in Paris? Or is that all forgotten now, passé? Maybe. For me the echo of that time is still there, still lurking in the streets and cafes of Montparnasse. You turn a corner and the decades drop away. Paris in the ’20s was a rare coming together of ideas, energy, creativity, literature and culture all in the perfect setting. Magic.

 

 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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I hadn't read that one, Ed. Delightful.

 

6 minutes ago, Alex Ramsay said:

I've had a simple wordpress.com blog for a good few years now, posting very occasionally as  Alex Ramsay Photography - which was reasonably popular among my friends and acquaintances, who liked the pictures, until I started going in for political rants (with fewer pics) about a certain shameful episode in this country's recent history. I think I shall start posting again soon, but staying (largely) off politics and concentrating on pictures.

 

Alex

I'd not seen the front pages of the Volksverräter and the Daily Mail juxtaposed like that before anywhere. That should be more widely published. Chilling.

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