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1 hour ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Brilliant advice, on all accounts, thank you. I shoot marches too and have done the middle-of-the-road thing. In San Francisco, they have bus stops on  cement islands in the middle of the road that are slightly elevated. You can perch there and the crowd naturally fans around it and you can get shots from above the crowd. But a monopod would help too.

 

I find any Island in the road can be of limited use if the march is taped off to only one side of the road. When the island is in a road with marchers on each side other photographers often stake out a space early with their steps such as in London's Piccadilly. I use a wired shutter release when using a monopod, other photographers use a wireless release. I prefer to keep it simple and foolproof but carry a spare wired release.

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Back when I was still carrying a Canon 5D and a couple of lenses, I used a Lowepro Outback 200 (or maybe a predecessor model) modular belt pack. I really liked using that format--saved the shoulders from the bag weight--but apparently not enough other people did, as it's no longer available.

 

I thought I had sold it, but recently came across it during a major Covid cleanup. Might try it with the Sony mirrorless.

 

But if you're looking for discreet, it does scream "PHOTOGRAPHER".

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My bus travel bag is a Kelty Redwing.   My Mirrorless Mover 20 with camera and spare lens inside fits in the bottom of the Redwing, so I'm just another old gringa with a mochela traveling around Nicaragua on the cheap by bus. 

 

I'd prefer not to have something behind me that's hard because one of the local mugging styles is knocking people down to the ground first, then robbing them (happened to two people I know here).  Shoulder bag works better for not falling down on metal and glass.  Sneaky stealing is more common during big saints day celebrations and horse parades/hipicos.

 

Money is what most thieves want.  I knew of people in NYC (circa 1969 to 1975) who always carried cigarettes and a $20 bill when walking their dogs in the evening, ready for either bums cadging cigarettes or muggers looking for cash.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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If I'm out doing photography - rather than out shopping, with a camera, just in case - I usually have one over each shoulder and an Amazon Basics backpack which is a great bag and a real bargain. https://www.amazon.co.uk/AmazonBasics-DSLR-Laptop-Backpack-Interior/dp/B00CD778LC/ref=sr_1_9?dchild=1&keywords=amazon+camera+bag&qid=1596054947&sr=8-9

 

Edited by Phil Robinson
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14 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

I find any Island in the road can be of limited use if the march is taped off to only one side of the road. When the island is in a road with marchers on each side other photographers often stake out a space early with their steps such as in London's Piccadilly. I use a wired shutter release when using a monopod, other photographers use a wireless release. I prefer to keep it simple and foolproof but carry a spare wired release.

 

I don't think I've ever been to a march that blocks off half the road. We get the whole road out here. Good to know about the monopod release. I was wondering about that.

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On 26/07/2020 at 07:57, Cal said:

I use a manfrotto advanced travel backpack, I bought it in early 2019 in preparation for a trip to New York and on realisation that at the time my interest in photography had waned because I had no good way of carrying kit around.

 

The main storage inside is just about big enough to take 2 reasonably sized DSLR type cameras (professional size body but not the Canon 1D/battery grip type), and a selection of medium sized lenses. If I needed to carry say a bulky telezoom like a 70-200 f/2.8 or a 100-400 I would only be able to fit one camera body. For reference I currently carry two Sony A-mount cams, an A99 and an A77ii, 85mm f/1.4, 70-300, 50, 18-55 and a 12-24. No room for anything else.

 

It has lots of little pockets and places to tuck away accessories and eats kit well given its size. It has a padded back and a pocket which will just about hold a slim smallish laptop (think 11 or 13 inch MacBook Air) and some paper documents. It's reasonably waterproof, although for torrential downpours you should use the included waterproof cover - I didn't last time I got caught in an absolute monsoon downpour and enough water seeped in to damage my A35 - but given how torrential it was and I hadn't used the waterproof cover I was impressed with how little water ingress there was.

 

The bag also has a tripod pocket on the side which just about fits my unwieldy hunk of crap that definitely isn't a manfrotto and makes it bearable to carry. Otherwise it fits snacks, a bottle of water, and it would take a reasonable sized telezoom if needed, though use caution as this part of the bag isn't well padded.

 

When not bagged I sling the camera over my shoulder using the strap, never round my neck as I find that highly uncomfortable. I can recommend the bag I have because it makes carrying a sizeable amount of kit enjoyable which results in it being taken out more often which results in pics. The padded back is a godsend, I am skinny and regular backpacks kill me because they dig in to my back. I've had it around 1.5 years now and it gets slung about everywhere, the back of my car, the gravelly sides of canals, fields covered in sheep droppings etc, you name it, it gets the job done. The side opening is especially useful as you can sling it round still on your back and get kit quickly.

 

Thanks for the great info. The side zipper access to camera is exactly the kind of thing I am looking for.

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On 26/07/2020 at 09:06, NYCat said:

I have a proper small Kata backpack I used for my wildlife trips but if I am just taking the D500 with 18-300 lens on the subway to the Central Park Zoo I prefer to look like I'm not carrying a camera so I use the bag my Crumpler computer bag came in. Just a canvas shopping bag that has short straps so the opening is right under my shoulder and not easy for someone to reach into. At the zoo I have it around my neck but usually also hold it in my hand to relieve the heaviness. I often think that if I had bigger shoulders life would be easier.

 

Paulette

 

Do you protect it somehow inside the canvas bag or is there enough padding?

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On 26/07/2020 at 09:53, Cecile Marion said:

For traveling on the subway and buses in large cities I do something similar to you, Paulette. I have a denim bag with both a cross body strap and short shoulder straps, so I can tuck the bag up under my arm, but let it hang free when I’m out of crowds, and it just looks like I might be out doing some light shopping. For other times, I also have a proper camera bag, with a waterproof cover, that can be worn as a backpack or as a sling.

 

Do you use padding of some type inside the denim bag to protect the camera?

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On 26/07/2020 at 10:29, Chuck Nacke said:

Been using DOMKE F2 bags since they were introduced.  Currently on my third one, the first

two were stolen, from a studio in San Francisco and the other from my apartment in NYC. 

These days I carry a body and lens over each shoulder with another body and flashes, cards,

paper notebook and batteries in the F2 bag.  These days it is a lot easier with the zooms,

using FF bodies I can cover from 16mm to 300 with only three lenses, all f2.8

 

Bought a "camera backpack" years ago and have never used it. 

 

I also hate the modern camera straps.  I only use old thin OEM NIKON straps.

 

Chuck

 

Do you put the extra equipment down while shooting? Or carry it all and manage not to drop or lose anything? What do you use the notebook for?

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On 26/07/2020 at 10:50, John Mitchell said:

I have several camera bags of different sizes. Since I switched to small mirrorless cameras, I've been getting a lot of use out of a small Tamrac bag that I've had for eons. It easily holds my Sony a6000 with two zooms (one attached). I also have a larger Sony bag for when I want to pack an extra prime lens or two, plus a rugged Tamrac bag with a waist strap and waterproof cover that I take hiking, etc. If I'm just going out on an errand and want to take a camera with me, I just toss one in an ordinary cloth tote bag. I usually carry cameras on a neck/shoulder strap, but I pack a wrist strap as well. I find that, in addition to being overpriced, many new camera bags don't have enough pockets for accessories, so I tend to hang onto my old ones.

 

Is your small bag something like this? https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1369549-REG/tamrac_t2110_1919_bushwick_2_shoulder_bag.html/?ap=y&ap=y&smp=y&smp=y&lsft=BI%3A514&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIh7S82Nrz6gIVNAnnCh08XQBgEAYYBCABEgJ4h_D_BwE

 

I have the a6000 too and small is good. I find regular camera bags way too bulky and obvious to carry around. When you toss it into a cloth tote bag, how do you protect it from damage? Do you just bring the one lens attached to the camera in that case?

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9 minutes ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

I don't think I've ever been to a march that blocks off half the road. We get the whole road out here. Good to know about the monopod release. I was wondering about that.

 

Only the larger marches take over both sides of the road. Smaller marches can simply use the pavements and I believe don't incur costs or need to agree a route with the police. I once photographed a march that started as a demo outside Downing Street, blocked the road, then set off at speed around central London. The police sent in horses and riders that tried to curtail the march without success. The horses got out of control backing up and rotating almost injuring shoppers and tourists on the pavement. It ended up at a building squatted and used for housing the homeless. Was interesting to photograph, though only one image sold.

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18 minutes ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Do you put the extra equipment down while shooting? Or carry it all and manage not to drop or lose anything? What do you use the notebook for?

No I do not put equipment down.  A "paper notebook" is for writing down information.

 

The reason that I have used DOMKE bags for over 30 years is that things do not fall out of them.

 

Chuck

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2 minutes ago, sb photos said:

 

Only the larger marches take over both sides of the road. Smaller marches can simply use the pavements and I believe don't incur costs or need to agree a route with the police. I once photographed a march that started as a demo outside Downing Street, blocked the road, then set off at speed around central London. The police sent in horses and riders that tried to curtail the march without success. The horses got out of control backing up and rotating almost injuring shoppers and tourists on the pavement. It ended up at a building squatted and used for housing the homeless. Was interesting to photograph, though only one image sold.

 

It's true. I have been mostly going to the major marches. I think about hitting smaller events, but lazy or lack time. I did go to a beautiful candlelight protest on a pedestrian sidewalk over the highway here. I am drawn to the ones that have unique or beautiful situations, costumes or settings. If I could, I would go to more. I really enjoy photographing protests but at this point it's all voluntary and I run out of energy.

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30 minutes ago, The Blinking Eye said:

Good to know about the monopod release. I was wondering about that.

 

The monopod that gets most use is very compact closed down, and still sufficiently rigid to support a D750 with a heavy 24-70 lens attached. It's a Velbon Ultra Stick Super 8. Now off to bed, just got my tax return completed and submitted. I always leave them to the last moment.

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44 minutes ago, sb photos said:

 

The monopod that gets most use is very compact closed down, and still sufficiently rigid to support a D750 with a heavy 24-70 lens attached. It's a Velbon Ultra Stick Super 8. Now off to bed, just got my tax return completed and submitted. I always leave them to the last moment.

 

Congrats on getting that done!

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On 29/07/2020 at 05:58, The Blinking Eye said:
On 26/07/2020 at 18:09, Sally R said:

Hi Kristin, I have ended up with 3 camera bags when I initially only intended to have one, which just kind of organically happened.

 

I have a camera backpack that has its own waterproof cover that fits neatly under it with velcro and can be pulled out to cover the pack when necessary. The pack has clipped connectors (like buckles I guess) at the waist and chest which takes the weight off your shoulders so that it is less burdensome to carry around. It looks like this:

https://www.leedervillecameras.com.au/products/cases-straps/cases/sol-/sol-case-model-no-8070

 

Oh my gosh. I absolutely love this. I don't like things hanging off my shoulders and it doesn't look like a camera bag, at least from the photo.  I had no idea such a thing existed. THANK YOU.

 

I think this one might be made locally here in Western Australia as the brand seems to be linked to just one particular camera shop here and not anywhere else. However, there would be many other brands with very similar backpacks out there. I find my Lowepro backpack has the most comfortable harness/buckle system. I've jammed it full of stuff and it's had a huge amount of wear and it is still going strong.

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8 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Do you put the extra equipment down while shooting? Or carry it all and manage not to drop or lose anything? What do you use the notebook for?

 

There's a pic I still need to upload (it might require me to apply for archive as it's an older film scan) that illustrates well how pros are adept at carrying seemingly endless amounts of kit. It was taken at a pride march and shows a photographer wielding what looks like a Canon 1D while another is strapped around his body. The one he's shooting has a 70-200 or similar, the other either a 16-35 or 24-70. Then he has a couple of bags on him which don't look light, and he was only a small guy. He also had a bizarre way of operating the camera, it looked like he was firing the shutter with his ring finger and using his index to twiddle the settings knob on the back.

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10 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Do you protect it somehow inside the canvas bag or is there enough padding?

 

I just use one of these wraps... https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/80974-REG/OP_TECH_USA_6811352_15_Soft_Wrap_Steel.html  I may be wrong, but I don't think my Nikon cameras are very fragile. Not that I want to drop it, of course, but hanging under my arm it seems OK.

 

Paulette

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10 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Do you use padding of some type inside the denim bag to protect the camera?

My bigger camera is an RX10, so not overly expensive. I generally protect it with a lightweight jacket or sweater placed in the bottom of my bag. 
Here’s an Internet pic of the kind of bag I bought a few years ago. https://www.vinted.fr/femmes/sacs-a-main/201238121-sac-fourre-tout-monoprix-en-jean

Edited by Cecile Marion
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17 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 

Is your small bag something like this? https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1369549-REG/tamrac_t2110_1919_bushwick_2_shoulder_bag.html/?ap=y&ap=y&smp=y&smp=y&lsft=BI%3A514&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIh7S82Nrz6gIVNAnnCh08XQBgEAYYBCABEgJ4h_D_BwE

 

I have the a6000 too and small is good. I find regular camera bags way too bulky and obvious to carry around. When you toss it into a cloth tote bag, how do you protect it from damage? Do you just bring the one lens attached to the camera in that case?

 

I bought mine in the 1990's. It might be a "messenger" bag. However, it's made of nylon with a front pocket on the front of the flap and a bigger one with a zipper hiding under the flap. The flap has a quick-release plastic clasp. I'm not fond of buckles. They look cool but can be fiddly. As mentioned, the older bags had lots of pockets, which I like. Manufacturers tend to make bags more streamlined now, which often means less storage space for accessories, etc. When I carry my a6000 with zoom attached in a cloth shoulder bag, I put it in a very old (1970's era) nylon "camera case" made for a manual focus SLR and lens. Not sure what I'll do if it ever wears out. They are pretty much an extinct species I imagine.

 

P.S. I bought this Sony bag a number of years ago. I don't love it, but it's lightweight, fairly well-made, and it holds a lot of stuff. When Sony closed all its stores in Canada, I picked one up on sale for a song ($25, I believe).

 

P.P.S. I just had a better look at the Bushwick bag that you linked to. It looks quite nice, except for the buckle, and the price is certainly right.

Edited by John Mitchell
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22 hours ago, Cal said:

 

There's a pic I still need to upload (it might require me to apply for archive as it's an older film scan) that illustrates well how pros are adept at carrying seemingly endless amounts of kit. It was taken at a pride march and shows a photographer wielding what looks like a Canon 1D while another is strapped around his body. The one he's shooting has a 70-200 or similar, the other either a 16-35 or 24-70. Then he has a couple of bags on him which don't look light, and he was only a small guy. He also had a bizarre way of operating the camera, it looked like he was firing the shutter with his ring finger and using his index to twiddle the settings knob on the back.

 

Let me know if you ever upload it!

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21 hours ago, NYCat said:

 

I just use one of these wraps... https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/80974-REG/OP_TECH_USA_6811352_15_Soft_Wrap_Steel.html  I may be wrong, but I don't think my Nikon cameras are very fragile. Not that I want to drop it, of course, but hanging under my arm it seems OK.

 

Paulette

 

That wrap thing is fantastic! Thank you!

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20 hours ago, Cecile Marion said:

My bigger camera is an RX10, so not overly expensive. I generally protect it with a lightweight jacket or sweater placed in the bottom of my bag. 
Here’s an Internet pic of the kind of bag I bought a few years ago. https://www.vinted.fr/femmes/sacs-a-main/201238121-sac-fourre-tout-monoprix-en-jean

 

That's totally something I would do.

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15 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

I bought mine in the 1990's. It might be a "messenger" bag. However, it's made of nylon with a front pocket on the front of the flap and a bigger one with a zipper hiding under the flap. The flap has a quick-release plastic clasp. I'm not fond of buckles. They look cool but can be fiddly. As mentioned, the older bags had lots of pockets, which I like. Manufacturers tend to make bags more streamlined now, which often means less storage space for accessories, etc. When I carry my a6000 with zoom attached in a cloth shoulder bag, I put it in a very old (1970's era) nylon "camera case" made for a manual focus SLR and lens. Not sure what I'll do if it ever wears out. They are pretty much an extinct species I imagine.

 

P.S. I bought this Sony bag a number of years ago. I don't love it, but it's lightweight, fairly well-made, and it holds a lot of stuff. When Sony closed all its stores in Canada, I picked one up on sale for a song ($25, I believe).

 

P.P.S. I just had a better look at the Bushwick bag that you linked to. It looks quite nice, except for the buckle, and the price is certainly right.

 

Really good point about the buckle on the Bushwick. I don't like it either.

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