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Asking for help with tags


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Some pointers:

JYC6F0  - you shouldn't have iguana, as it isn't an iguana. Don't know why you have 'green' as a keyword.

I tried to find 'Wisconsin Tree Frog', but I couldn't find that via Google. If there is such a thing, have Wisconsin Tree Frog as a keyword phrase and its scientific name also. For example IF it happens to be a Gray Tree Frog (I have no idea about American frogs, sorry), you should have Gray Treefrog as a keword phrase and Hyla versicolor as another keyword pbhrase. This site may help you with ID: don't just guess which species it is. http://wiatri.net/inventory/frogtoadsurvey/WIfrogs

Also put the verified species name and scientific name in the description, as that counts in search as well.

 

You don't really need skin or eye in your keywords, as that would be assumed (all frogs have them, unless they've lost an eye), and if a potential buyer is looking for frog skin or frog eye, they almost certainly want something different to a photo of a frog on a branch.

 

Again, it would be far better if you had a positive ID of the dragonfly species. #JYC66K

 

In #JXE6J5, you have green and black, neither of which I see in your photo, but you have identified the species. You could also have USA and American, in case someone searches American lizard or American Skink.

 

 

 

 
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37 minutes ago, mickfly said:

Your images look too dark to me and I don't see a dragonfly here... JYC6TT

Indeed, a triple whammy: the title is wrong, the 'further information' is wrong and almost all of the keywords are wrong.

We all make mistakes, but this is inexplicable.

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8 hours ago, Cryptoprocta said:

Indeed, a triple whammy: the title is wrong, the 'further information' is wrong and almost all of the keywords are wrong.

We all make mistakes, but this is inexplicable.

Sorry, still getting used to how the image manager works. I must have still had the thistle image checked when I was working on the dragonfly one.  Most of it is fixed. going to check up on the frog ID then see if anything else needs to be fixed.

 

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25 minutes ago, Pamela Walsh said:

Sorry, still getting used to how the image manager works. I must have still had the thistle image checked when I was working on the dragonfly one.  Most of it is fixed. going to check up on the frog ID then see if anything else needs to be fixed.

 

 

To be fair, it's very easy to have another image clicked and not realise when you're keywording the next pic - I've done it a ton of times.  That's one of the awful things about the new AIM.  Persevere, fix the errors and you'll soon get the hang of it.  :)

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1 minute ago, Colblimp said:

 

To be fair, it's very easy to have another image clicked and not realise when you're keywording the next pic - I've done it a ton of times.  That's one of the awful things about the new AIM.  Persevere, fix the errors and you'll soon get the hang of it.  :)

Thanks, I think they are fixed.

 

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10 hours ago, Cryptoprocta said:

Some pointers:

JYC6F0  - you shouldn't have iguana, as it isn't an iguana. Don't know why you have 'green' as a keyword.

I tried to find 'Wisconsin Tree Frog', but I couldn't find that via Google. If there is such a thing, have Wisconsin Tree Frog as a keyword phrase and its scientific name also. For example IF it happens to be a Gray Tree Frog (I have no idea about American frogs, sorry), you should have Gray Treefrog as a keword phrase and Hyla versicolor as another keyword pbhrase. This site may help you with ID: don't just guess which species it is. http://wiatri.net/inventory/frogtoadsurvey/WIfrogs

Also put the verified species name and scientific name in the description, as that counts in search as well.

 

You don't really need skin or eye in your keywords, as that would be assumed (all frogs have them, unless they've lost an eye), and if a potential buyer is looking for frog skin or frog eye, they almost certainly want something different to a photo of a frog on a branch.

 

Again, it would be far better if you had a positive ID of the dragonfly species. #JYC66K

 

In #JXE6J5, you have green and black, neither of which I see in your photo, but you have identified the species. You could also have USA and American, in case someone searches American lizard or American Skink.

 

 

 

 

Thank you for the link. :) it's eastern grey tree frog.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Colblimp said:

 

To be fair, it's very easy to have another image clicked and not realise when you're keywording the next pic - I've done it a ton of times.  That's one of the awful things about the new AIM.  Persevere, fix the errors and you'll soon get the hang of it.  :)

You're right, it's a nightmare. And I'm still having to click up to a dozen times sometimes to choose supertags.

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This is the only place anyone has said my images are dark :(

 

Can't seem to find where to calibrate my screen. I don't have lightroom. I can adjust the brightness, but it doesn't really tell me anything except that it's right in the middle.

 

 

Edited by Pamela Walsh
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There is also a more or less reasonably priced option; the ColorHug2 from Hughski in the UK. 

As far as I remember its below GBP 100, but may be slightly more difficult to use for a Windows or Apple user. 

It comes with a bootable linux USB stick to create ICC profiles for all monitors connected.

These profiles need then loading on the respective operating system.  

Me, being on Linux anyways, am not bothered at all, just works as a charm out of the box. 

 

I am not sure how this device compares to other, maybe more professional options, but it does do  a good enough job for me personally.

The two screens connected to my machine are both calibrated and show hardly any difference, despite being from different manufactures and age. 

When running the screens uncalibrated, the difference between them is really >>>HUGE<<<<. 

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13 hours ago, Cryptoprocta said:

You're right, it's a nightmare. And I'm still having to click up to a dozen times sometimes to choose supertags.

 

I am new here but found the button "Clear selection" at the top right of the image manager. Then you unselect all the previously selected picts before choosing tags for a specific image.

 

Edited by Southmind
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On ‎8‎/‎24‎/‎2017 at 02:14, gvallee said:

 

What software do you use to process your images?

 

Gen

well, I have Photoshop CS6, but it was on the computer when my nephew gave it to me. CS6, Bridge, and Illustrator I think... haven't tried that one.

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57 minutes ago, Pamela Walsh said:

well, I have Photoshop CS6, but it was on the computer when my nephew gave it to me. CS6, Bridge, and Illustrator I think... haven't tried that one.

 

Perfect. The best way is definitely to keyword in Bridge before upload.

 

Gen

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8 minutes ago, arterra said:

 

Desktop or laptop?

 

Cheers,

Philippe

Laptop

 

 

3 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

Perfect. The best way is definitely to keyword in Bridge before upload.

 

Gen

I mostly did, but thought of more ... then I always forget to go back and put them in the file info.

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Hi Pamela,

 

Don't mean to hijack your thread. But wanted the experienced contributors opinions about my images so far!

 

Hope you don't mind.

 

By the way, I got an xrite hardware calibrator so calibration is important. I don't know if I've improved so we'll see what everyone thinks.

 

Hai :)

 

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7 minutes ago, Hai Nguyen said:

Hi Pamela,

 

Don't mean to hijack your thread. But wanted the experienced contributors opinions about my images so far!

 

Hope you don't mind.

 

By the way, I got an xrite hardware calibrator so calibration is important. I don't know if I've improved so we'll see what everyone thinks.

 

Hai :)

 

 

Hai, I suggest you start your own thread asking for a portfolio critique in the "Let's Talk about pics" section. People will help you.

 

Gen

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22 hours ago, arterra said:

 

Just my two cents. But laptops are a BIG NONO for editing images. One of Arterra's photographers (splendid wildlife photographer, but a real field man who hates sitting indoors behind a computer) edits his pictures on a laptop. His work looks like done by ten different people on ten different computers. Reason: the tilting screen. Assuming you always sit in the same location under the same lighting conditions, your contrast varies each time depending on how much you tilted your screen. Also, at first, you sit upright but after two hours you probably hang more in your chair resulting in again looking at another angle to your screen >>> showing another contrast ;)

 

Cheers,

Philippe

It's all I have :( and can't really afford (or have room for) anything else right now.  unless some kind soul were willing to sponsor a new computer.... purely for the sake of integrity of photos mind you ;)

 

I might be able to hook up a separate screen though... eventually.

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5 hours ago, Pamela Walsh said:

It's all I have :( and can't really afford (or have room for) anything else right now.  unless some kind soul were willing to sponsor a new computer.... purely for the sake of integrity of photos mind you ;)

 

I might be able to hook up a separate screen though... eventually.

 

If you can find a good greyscale gradient chart to keep on your laptop it can help you keep the correct angle. I'd advise on one but it is no longer available. They show the progression from white to black and you can adjust until you see all the separate shades.

 

Paulette

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7 hours ago, Pamela Walsh said:

It's all I have :( and can't really afford (or have room for) anything else right now.  unless some kind soul were willing to sponsor a new computer.... purely for the sake of integrity of photos mind you ;)

 

I might be able to hook up a separate screen though... eventually.

 

You don't need a new computer, just an actual monitor.  You can plug that into your laptop and use your laptop like a desktop.  I did that for 4 years.  Get a bluetooth keyboard and mouse and it will even be easier.  If you laptop does not have bluetooth, be sure to get a mouse and laptop combo that comes with a USB dongle that supplies bluetooth to your mouse and keyboard.

 

Jill

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I've ran my photography business on my lappy for the last 4 1/2 years with no problems - every image is processed on the laptop.  I only got a separate monitor a couple of months ago, which has made my life easier, but to say you can't get good results from a lappy is, quite frankly, wrong.

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I had a very good Apple laptop, it had the largest screen available, a couple of years ago. I tool it with me when I traveled to download my images to. I had PS installed. In the evenings, I often culled images, and I developed a few.  When I got home and transferred them to my Mac, I was shocked at the appearance of the ones I developed on the laptop. None passed muster.

All that work was for nothing because I redeveloped them all.  I'm not saying it can't be done, but I obviously couldn't get them to my standards. 

Maybe it had something to do with impossible color calibration on a moving machine.

Betty

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