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Betty LaRue
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"Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs."

 

Strumming? I don't do no strumming! Next thing, you'll be accusing John Williams, Paco de Lucia, and Charlie Byrd of strumming. 

 

 

 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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12 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Drinking in the pub? I don't do no drinking' in no pub. I've not been in a pub in about a year. 

 

You're missing out Ed! Although the government seems to be sticking its head in the sand about the soaring cases. Bojo must be getting dizzy with all the u-turns...

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17 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Drinking in the pub? I don't do no drinking' in no pub. I've not been in a pub in about a year. 

I can’t remember when I was last in a pub. Within the last year I’ve drunk a pint in a beer garden only 3 times. 

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Tuning pianos by ear, yikes! I never had perfect pitch. Or perfect anything else. 

 

I tried to find a replacement for my factory-made Japanese guitar and bought two in the flowing years. I hated them both. I also had a steel-string Ovation and an old damaged Martin folk. None of them had the feel and sound of my favourite. 

 

I gave one of the new ones to my stepson, who is a pro bass player. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPnesveFLIc

 

https://www.innerviews.org/inner/hansford-rowe

Edited by Ed Rooney
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45 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

"Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs."

 

Strumming? I don't do no strumming! Next thing, you'll be accusing John Williams, Paco de Luca, and Charlie Byrd of strumming. 

 

 

 

Ohhhh. Paco deLucia. Whenever he was in New York I was there. Were you?

 

Paulette

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4 hours ago, Steve F said:

 

Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs (no offense Ed 🙃) I see there's a big range of Martin guitars Betty, what have you got?

https://reverb.com/item/25778594-martin-000-10e-left-handed-cherry-acoustic-guitar-w-case?bk=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJqdGkiOiJhY2VkN2IyMy1kYWRlLTQyODUtOTU1Ni04NzBlZTY5NzhmNzEiLCJpYXQiOjE2MjYyODgxODQsInVzZXJfaWQiOiIiLCJzZXNzaW9uX2lkIjoiIiwiY29va2llX2lkIjoiMTIyYzU4MDctOTI3Zi00ZWYyLWEwMzEtMmE0ZjM5ZDliZTY3IiwicHJvZHVjdF9pZCI6IjI1Nzc4NTk0Iiwic291cmNlIjoiTk9ORSJ9.Li1Eat415e32tpObgqqd3Lz7nNDPe0WrW21C0jWg_zg
This looks like the one. It’s made of solid Sapele wood, which is often called “African mahogany “.

About Sapele:

One of the most common questions we hear, “is Sapele a hardwood or softwood?” Usually this is because Sapele is known as an exterior wood and so many good exterior woods are also softwoods. The funny thing is that the botanical definition of hardwood and softwood has nothing to do with how hard the wood actually is; but rather it denotes the structure of the tree and in general whether or not it loses its leaves. Sapele is technically a hardwood or a deciduous tree. But to answer to more common question it is also a quite hard wood when you compare it to the typical North American species, and much harder than much of the typical exterior woods like Cedar and Cypress. Sapele wood is of medium hardness with a Janka rating of 1510 lbs making is harder than most domestic North American Species and almost twice as hard as Genuine Mahogany.  Additionally Sapele grows with an interlocking grain pattern where the fibers twist around the tree as they grow.  While the grain pattern is still moving in the same direction, the interlocking pattern acts to cancel out a lot of movement that is typically found across the grain.  This hardness and medium density as well as propensity for straight grained boles (central trunk of the tree) makes Sapele wood very stable and thus predictable from the moment it is felled to when it is pulled from a drying kiln.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

https://reverb.com/item/25778594-martin-000-10e-left-handed-cherry-acoustic-guitar-w-case?bk=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJqdGkiOiJhY2VkN2IyMy1kYWRlLTQyODUtOTU1Ni04NzBlZTY5NzhmNzEiLCJpYXQiOjE2MjYyODgxODQsInVzZXJfaWQiOiIiLCJzZXNzaW9uX2lkIjoiIiwiY29va2llX2lkIjoiMTIyYzU4MDctOTI3Zi00ZWYyLWEwMzEtMmE0ZjM5ZDliZTY3IiwicHJvZHVjdF9pZCI6IjI1Nzc4NTk0Iiwic291cmNlIjoiTk9ORSJ9.Li1Eat415e32tpObgqqd3Lz7nNDPe0WrW21C0jWg_zg
This looks like the one. It’s made of solid Sapele wood, which is often called “African mahogany “.

About Sapele:

One of the most common questions we hear, “is Sapele a hardwood or softwood?” Usually this is because Sapele is known as an exterior wood and so many good exterior woods are also softwoods. The funny thing is that the botanical definition of hardwood and softwood has nothing to do with how hard the wood actually is; but rather it denotes the structure of the tree and in general whether or not it loses its leaves. Sapele is technically a hardwood or a deciduous tree. But to answer to more common question it is also a quite hard wood when you compare it to the typical North American species, and much harder than much of the typical exterior woods like Cedar and Cypress. Sapele wood is of medium hardness with a Janka rating of 1510 lbs making is harder than most domestic North American Species and almost twice as hard as Genuine Mahogany.  Additionally Sapele grows with an interlocking grain pattern where the fibers twist around the tree as they grow.  While the grain pattern is still moving in the same direction, the interlocking pattern acts to cancel out a lot of movement that is typically found across the grain.  This hardness and medium density as well as propensity for straight grained boles (central trunk of the tree) makes Sapele wood very stable and thus predictable from the moment it is felled to when it is pulled from a drying kiln.

 

That's a nice looking guitar Betty. Never heard of Sapele wood, guess that's native to North America. Also good to get the hardwood softwood lesson 😃

Here's mine, pine body with a maple neck:

https://www.andertons.co.uk/guitar-dept/electric-guitars/telecaster/fender-modern-player-telecaster-plus-in-honey-burst

My favourite thing is the cut out for my tummy 🤣

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9 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I was thinking of buying a guitar as well.   Just to hang on the wall in my man cave.

 

Allan

 

 

Well, they can be considered works of art in their own right. Guess it would make a good conversation piece when someone visits (until you get asked about playing it 🙃)

Edited by Steve F
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3 minutes ago, Steve F said:

 

Well, they can be considered works of art in their own right. Guess it makes a good conversation piece when someone visits (until you get asked about playing it 🙃)

 

If asked to play it I will say,  "I have never played it since the dog died and never will again."😔  That will keep them quiet.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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19 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I was thinking of buying a guitar as well.   Just to hang on the wall in my man cave.

 

Allan

 

Some years ago I went to a charity Blues Night in Oxford Town Hall. I paid £5 for a raffle ticket and won the first prize….a Fender signed by the headline act, whose name I cannot recall. It is still hanging on our wall and has sadly never been properly played. I am hoping one of the grandchildren will be inspired by it one day! 

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The first guitar I bought this month was an acoustic Fender, but it was a Dreadnought. It was cheap, and I was looking to buy one just a little better. That was all they had in a left handed in Wichita. It actually sounded quite nice, but was too big for me and I couldn’t hold it comfortably.

The Martin body is a bit thinner, but still sounds great and fits me so much better.  I drove most of the day, round trip, to get it.

Allan, you’re a hoot.

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8 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

The first guitar I bought this month was an acoustic Fender, but it was a Dreadnought. It was cheap, and I was looking to buy one just a little better. That was all they had in a left handed in Wichita. It actually sounded quite nice, but was too big for me and I couldn’t hold it comfortably.

The Martin body is a bit thinner, but still sounds great and fits me so much better.  I drove most of the day, round trip, to get it.

Allan, you’re a hoot.

 

HOOT! HOOT!  Out of the way I'm coming through.

 

Allan

 

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10 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Did David Freeman have any involvement in that, Thyrsis? 

It’s possible Radio Oxford was involved, it was a fundraiser organised by a friend who’s son was a haemophiliac.

The headliner and guy who presented me with the guitar on stage was Otis Grand. He had signed the back but it’s mostly rubbed off now! 

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7 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

David was the host at the show Radio Oxford where I did my weekly spot back in the '80s. He has a two-hour show from 5 to 7 on Sundays now with Jazz FM. He features Blues and Buggie. 

 

Morning or evening?

 

Allan

 

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1 hour ago, Thyrsis said:

It’s possible Radio Oxford was involved, 

All I’ve ever gained from Radio Oxford was 2 tickets for a Rolling Stones concert at the old Wembley Stadium. Was most enjoyable, were good seats too.

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15 minutes ago, Thyrsis said:

 

5pm til 7pm.

 

Thanks T.  That is when I am doing my ablutions so will turn the radio in the shower up.

 

Allan

 

Just looked up "Thyrsis" and this is what WIKI  says:

 

Thyrsis or Tirsi may refer to:

 

Which is it?  I may have asked before but have forgotten.

 

ITMA

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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11 minutes ago, sb photos said:

All I’ve ever gained from Radio Oxford was 2 tickets for a Rolling Stones concert at the old Wembley Stadium. Was most enjoyable, were good seats too.

 

I'm pleased you got the tickets. I was and still am not very keen on the Rolling Stones. Sorry.

 

Allan

 

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1 hour ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Thanks T.  That is when I am doing my ablutions so will turn the radio in the shower up.

 

Allan

 

Just looked up "Thyrsis" and this is what WIKI  says:

 

Thyrsis or Tirsi may refer to:

 

Which is it?  I may have asked before but have forgotten.

 

ITMA

 

 

The first one! The poem is set around where we live and contains the line 'Her foot the Cumner cowslips never stirr'd;' It's now spelled Cumnor and our garden is full of cowslips in the spring.

The best known line in the poem is ' and that sweet city with her dreaming spires' It's a beautiful poem!

A86NED.jpg

This image is our sole Alamywhack!!

Edited by Thyrsis
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