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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

All of my life since then I’ve had dreams where I’d be somewhere, see a piano, sit down and instinctively begin playing the most beautiful music, my fingers knowing where to go without my thinking it. The compositions were often new, nothing I’ve ever heard before.
Those repetitive piano dreams still happen.

 

I used to wish I could just play the piano.... but that was from hearing 'Sparky's Magic Piano' on Saturday morning's 'Children's Choice'!

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11 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

I started electric many years ago, mainly because it was used and didn’t cost much and my husband found the deal. At the time, I was singing a bit, but I didn’t have a mike, and I have a somewhat soft voice. (A lot from shyness) It was strung upside down and rattled.

Then my husband bought me a classical with nylon strings, (without asking what I wanted) very high action that shredded my fingertips even with the calluses I had built up.

This one, my Martin that I finally bought to suit what I wanted, is left-handed, steel strings, low-action and sweeeet.

 

Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs (no offense Ed 🙃) I see there's a big range of Martin guitars Betty, what have you got?

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2 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

P All of my life since then I’ve had dreams where I’d be somewhere, see a piano, sit down and instinctively begin playing the most beautiful music, my fingers knowing where to go without my thinking it. The compositions were often new, nothing I’ve ever heard before.
Those repetitive piano dreams still happen.

My wife plays piano and piano accordion, and I like to hear the piano in the house. I've considered trying to learn to play it, but the concept of having to read two sets of notes simultaneously - one for each hand - is very off putting.  I just don't understand how people can do it ! The human brain, Ok not mine, is a wondrous  thing.

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5 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

I've had three separate adventures in music. I was a jazz trumpet player in my teens and early 20s. Adventure #2 found me as a folk singer and it was then that I played guitar to accompany myself. When I came back to the States from Oxfordshire, film had begun to move into digital and my ability to earn enough from stock disappeared. At the same time a nephew was composing music on a keyboard synth. I watched him for awhile and thought "I can do that." And so I did. I composed very short pieces for commercials and a documentary as a ghost writer for a former jazz mate of mine, he in LA and me in NYC. 

 

None of these attempts at a music career ever really got off the ground. Until about 10 years ago, I continued to play the guitar for myself until it blew up on my wall one night from the dry steam heat in my old NY building. All three of these efforts are very long stories, so I just touched on them here. 

 

Wow Ed, you must have a lot of interesting anecdotes when you're drinking in the pub! :)

 

My (sadly deceased) grandad joined the Royal Marines at 18 at the start of WWII and was training as a stores clerk. Then they found out he could play clarinet and piano so they had him join one of several Royal Marines bands (each band played a different part of the UK apparently) and he was playing for the troops and civilians in the south of England for most of the war. Finally he got sent on a ship to invade Japan. They stopped off on the east coast of India on the way and it was discovered that he could tune pianos by ear. So then he spent the next 6-8 months tuning pianos in officer's messes in India. Finally he gets sent to Singapore. The day before he landed, the US dropped the 2nd atomic bomb and the Japanese surrendered. Shortly after that, he got sent back to Blighty on a P&O liner and formed a jazz band to entertain the troops on the ship. After he got out of the marines, he formed a jazz band and was playing all over London.

 

I'm writing about him, because I have no interesting anecdotes about playing guitar on my own 😅

Ed, you've left us hanging, did you get a replacement guitar?

Edited by Steve F
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"Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs."

 

Strumming? I don't do no strumming! Next thing, you'll be accusing John Williams, Paco de Lucia, and Charlie Byrd of strumming. 

 

 

 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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12 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Drinking in the pub? I don't do no drinking' in no pub. I've not been in a pub in about a year. 

 

You're missing out Ed! Although the government seems to be sticking its head in the sand about the soaring cases. Bojo must be getting dizzy with all the u-turns...

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17 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

Drinking in the pub? I don't do no drinking' in no pub. I've not been in a pub in about a year. 

I can’t remember when I was last in a pub. Within the last year I’ve drunk a pint in a beer garden only 3 times. 

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Tuning pianos by ear, yikes! I never had perfect pitch. Or perfect anything else. 

 

I tried to find a replacement for my factory-made Japanese guitar and bought two in the flowing years. I hated them both. I also had a steel-string Ovation and an old damaged Martin folk. None of them had the feel and sound of my favourite. 

 

I gave one of the new ones to my stepson, who is a pro bass player. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPnesveFLIc

 

https://www.innerviews.org/inner/hansford-rowe

Edited by Ed Rooney
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45 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

"Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs."

 

Strumming? I don't do no strumming! Next thing, you'll be accusing John Williams, Paco de Luca, and Charlie Byrd of strumming. 

 

 

 

Ohhhh. Paco deLucia. Whenever he was in New York I was there. Were you?

 

Paulette

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Steve F said:

 

Oh dear, everyone seems to play classical guitars in Austria too. Very fat nylon strings and not much use apart from strumming folk songs (no offense Ed 🙃) I see there's a big range of Martin guitars Betty, what have you got?

https://reverb.com/item/25778594-martin-000-10e-left-handed-cherry-acoustic-guitar-w-case?bk=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJqdGkiOiJhY2VkN2IyMy1kYWRlLTQyODUtOTU1Ni04NzBlZTY5NzhmNzEiLCJpYXQiOjE2MjYyODgxODQsInVzZXJfaWQiOiIiLCJzZXNzaW9uX2lkIjoiIiwiY29va2llX2lkIjoiMTIyYzU4MDctOTI3Zi00ZWYyLWEwMzEtMmE0ZjM5ZDliZTY3IiwicHJvZHVjdF9pZCI6IjI1Nzc4NTk0Iiwic291cmNlIjoiTk9ORSJ9.Li1Eat415e32tpObgqqd3Lz7nNDPe0WrW21C0jWg_zg
This looks like the one. It’s made of solid Sapele wood, which is often called “African mahogany “.

About Sapele:

One of the most common questions we hear, “is Sapele a hardwood or softwood?” Usually this is because Sapele is known as an exterior wood and so many good exterior woods are also softwoods. The funny thing is that the botanical definition of hardwood and softwood has nothing to do with how hard the wood actually is; but rather it denotes the structure of the tree and in general whether or not it loses its leaves. Sapele is technically a hardwood or a deciduous tree. But to answer to more common question it is also a quite hard wood when you compare it to the typical North American species, and much harder than much of the typical exterior woods like Cedar and Cypress. Sapele wood is of medium hardness with a Janka rating of 1510 lbs making is harder than most domestic North American Species and almost twice as hard as Genuine Mahogany.  Additionally Sapele grows with an interlocking grain pattern where the fibers twist around the tree as they grow.  While the grain pattern is still moving in the same direction, the interlocking pattern acts to cancel out a lot of movement that is typically found across the grain.  This hardness and medium density as well as propensity for straight grained boles (central trunk of the tree) makes Sapele wood very stable and thus predictable from the moment it is felled to when it is pulled from a drying kiln.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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1 hour ago, Betty LaRue said:

https://reverb.com/item/25778594-martin-000-10e-left-handed-cherry-acoustic-guitar-w-case?bk=eyJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJqdGkiOiJhY2VkN2IyMy1kYWRlLTQyODUtOTU1Ni04NzBlZTY5NzhmNzEiLCJpYXQiOjE2MjYyODgxODQsInVzZXJfaWQiOiIiLCJzZXNzaW9uX2lkIjoiIiwiY29va2llX2lkIjoiMTIyYzU4MDctOTI3Zi00ZWYyLWEwMzEtMmE0ZjM5ZDliZTY3IiwicHJvZHVjdF9pZCI6IjI1Nzc4NTk0Iiwic291cmNlIjoiTk9ORSJ9.Li1Eat415e32tpObgqqd3Lz7nNDPe0WrW21C0jWg_zg
This looks like the one. It’s made of solid Sapele wood, which is often called “African mahogany “.

About Sapele:

One of the most common questions we hear, “is Sapele a hardwood or softwood?” Usually this is because Sapele is known as an exterior wood and so many good exterior woods are also softwoods. The funny thing is that the botanical definition of hardwood and softwood has nothing to do with how hard the wood actually is; but rather it denotes the structure of the tree and in general whether or not it loses its leaves. Sapele is technically a hardwood or a deciduous tree. But to answer to more common question it is also a quite hard wood when you compare it to the typical North American species, and much harder than much of the typical exterior woods like Cedar and Cypress. Sapele wood is of medium hardness with a Janka rating of 1510 lbs making is harder than most domestic North American Species and almost twice as hard as Genuine Mahogany.  Additionally Sapele grows with an interlocking grain pattern where the fibers twist around the tree as they grow.  While the grain pattern is still moving in the same direction, the interlocking pattern acts to cancel out a lot of movement that is typically found across the grain.  This hardness and medium density as well as propensity for straight grained boles (central trunk of the tree) makes Sapele wood very stable and thus predictable from the moment it is felled to when it is pulled from a drying kiln.

 

That's a nice looking guitar Betty. Never heard of Sapele wood, guess that's native to North America. Also good to get the hardwood softwood lesson 😃

Here's mine, pine body with a maple neck:

https://www.andertons.co.uk/guitar-dept/electric-guitars/telecaster/fender-modern-player-telecaster-plus-in-honey-burst

My favourite thing is the cut out for my tummy 🤣

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I was thinking of buying a guitar as well.   Just to hang on the wall in my man cave.

 

Allan

 

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9 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I was thinking of buying a guitar as well.   Just to hang on the wall in my man cave.

 

Allan

 

 

Well, they can be considered works of art in their own right. Guess it would make a good conversation piece when someone visits (until you get asked about playing it 🙃)

Edited by Steve F
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3 minutes ago, Steve F said:

 

Well, they can be considered works of art in their own right. Guess it makes a good conversation piece when someone visits (until you get asked about playing it 🙃)

 

If asked to play it I will say,  "I have never played it since the dog died and never will again."😔  That will keep them quiet.

 

Allan

 

Edited by Allan Bell
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We can't be talking about pet dogs dying here in the good thing thread, Allan. We have to draw the line somewhere. 

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19 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

I was thinking of buying a guitar as well.   Just to hang on the wall in my man cave.

 

Allan

 

Some years ago I went to a charity Blues Night in Oxford Town Hall. I paid £5 for a raffle ticket and won the first prize….a Fender signed by the headline act, whose name I cannot recall. It is still hanging on our wall and has sadly never been properly played. I am hoping one of the grandchildren will be inspired by it one day! 

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The first guitar I bought this month was an acoustic Fender, but it was a Dreadnought. It was cheap, and I was looking to buy one just a little better. That was all they had in a left handed in Wichita. It actually sounded quite nice, but was too big for me and I couldn’t hold it comfortably.

The Martin body is a bit thinner, but still sounds great and fits me so much better.  I drove most of the day, round trip, to get it.

Allan, you’re a hoot.

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8 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

The first guitar I bought this month was an acoustic Fender, but it was a Dreadnought. It was cheap, and I was looking to buy one just a little better. That was all they had in a left handed in Wichita. It actually sounded quite nice, but was too big for me and I couldn’t hold it comfortably.

The Martin body is a bit thinner, but still sounds great and fits me so much better.  I drove most of the day, round trip, to get it.

Allan, you’re a hoot.

 

HOOT! HOOT!  Out of the way I'm coming through.

 

Allan

 

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10 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Did David Freeman have any involvement in that, Thyrsis? 

It’s possible Radio Oxford was involved, it was a fundraiser organised by a friend who’s son was a haemophiliac.

The headliner and guy who presented me with the guitar on stage was Otis Grand. He had signed the back but it’s mostly rubbed off now! 

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David was the host at the show Radio Oxford where I did my weekly spot back in the '80s. He has a two-hour show from 5 to 7 on Sundays now with Jazz FM. He features Blues and Buggie. 

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7 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

David was the host at the show Radio Oxford where I did my weekly spot back in the '80s. He has a two-hour show from 5 to 7 on Sundays now with Jazz FM. He features Blues and Buggie. 

 

Morning or evening?

 

Allan

 

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