Jump to content
Alan Beastall

2020 January Favourity Uploads

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, cbimages said:

Always love to see the male clownfish tending the eggs.


clownfish-amphiprion-percula-male-fish-aerating-eggs-laid-cleared-substrate-underneath-the-host-magnificent-sea-anemone-heteractis-magnifica-2ANRE94.jpg

You sure he isn’t having dinner? :D Great shot!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rotorua

2ANTKME.jpg

2ANTKMA.jpg

1955 Ford Customline Fordor sedan V8 (unless Wim has a better idea!)

2ANTKW9.jpg

2ANTKXT.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being fed up with endless wet and gloomy weekends, I took myself off to Cardiff's indoor market in the hope of finding something interesting to shoot. Discovered a very charming vintage-style clothes stall had sprung up. Had to have that!

 

2AM77DB.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tried to escape the rain in Arizona but it rained for most of my visit (!).  However there was a day in which it was just cloudy.  This is Oak Canyon near Sedona.

 

2AP46F8.jpg

And Beaver Creek day area:

 

2AP46DP.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was bush camping miles away for civilisation. Access is by rough dirt roads only, preferably 4x4.

I stayed several hours by this tree waiting for the sky to be right. 

I was trying light painting with my torch but the beam was too narrow and it was not doing a good job.

What happens next? Unbelievably, two 4x4 cars drove past (to top it off, one had a tinnie on the roof!! so far from any water). Their headlights lit the tree perfectly. 

Moral of the story: always expect the unexpected.

 

2AP8KHC.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is how they empty the toilets in Tongariro National Park in New Zealand. With a helicopter.

Mt Ruapehu volcano behind.

2APH6WJ.jpg

Here's said convenience.

2APH6TM.jpg

Taranaki falls

2APH6W1.jpg

 

Edited by spacecadet
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, gvallee said:

<>

(to top it off, one had a tinnie on the roof!! so far from any water).

<>

Moral of the story: always expect the unexpected.

 

Said Noah to his neighbors..

😁

 

wim

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2APJKFX.jpg

About time you had a bit of Māori

Raukawa marae, Ōtaki

2APJKG7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, spacecadet said:

This is how they empty the toilets in Tongariro National Park in New Zealand. With a helicopter.

Mt Ruapehu volcano behind.

2APH6WJ.jpg

Here's said convenience.

 

 

nice capture... 

 

over $100,000 per year just to remove excrement.  one of the major issue that over tourism is bringing to the area...    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, meanderingemu said:

 

nice capture... 

 

over $100,000 per year just to remove excrement.  one of the major issue that over tourism is bringing to the area...    

I don't know about that.

We talked to the chap at the visitor centre- he was on the helicopter crew earlier!- that particular loo only needs emptying about 4 times a year and the job takes about 20 minutes. They don't want people burying waste- it doesn't decompose in the arid environment- so there are a comparatively large number of loos. The DOC consider it a small price to pay to keep the national parks pristine.

It certainly wasn't crowded even in midsummer; even our short "hike" takes a few hours so no-one does it casually.

 

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, spacecadet said:

I don't know about that.

We talked to the chap at the visitor centre- he was on the helicopter crew earlier!- that particular loo only needs emptying about 4 times a year and the job takes about 20 minutes. They don't want people burying waste- it doesn't decompose in the arid environment- so there are a comparatively large number of loos. The DOC consider it a small price to pay to keep the national parks pristine.

It certainly wasn't crowded even in midsummer; even our short "hike" takes a few hours so no-one does it casually.

 

 

 

i've seen the Crossing with over 4000 people in one day. Looking down from Ngauruhoe it looked like ants (and i saw lot's of people who were unprepared).  And yes the evacuation is the price to pay, but it is still a burden on tax payer.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some very calm water here ....

A man walks along a walkway across the Marine Lake on Clevedon seafront during a calm winter's day. Clevedon, North Somerset, UK. Stock Photo

 

 

 

A man strolls along a walkway across the Marine Lake on Clevedon seafront during a calm winter's day. Clevedon, North Somerset, UK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flinders Ranges, South Australia

 

2APDGTG.jpg

 

2AP8KTD.jpg

 

2APDH8N.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arkaroola Wilderness Sanctuary, South Australia

 

2APFNPH.jpg

 

2APFNRN.jpg

 

2APFNRH.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not spamming but catching up with my uploads. I'll be hitting the road again after this post and won't have Internet for a few days (heading to a bush pub in the middle of nowhere, love those).

 

Sunrise at Arkaroola, South Australia

2ANMGKJ.jpg

 

The Goanna, Flinders Ranges, S.A.

2AP8KT4.jpg

 

The Old Ghan Railway, Parachilna, South Australia

2AP8KKX.jpg

 

Red-capped Robin

2AP8KX3.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shinrin-yoku-hikers-walking-in-winter-in

 

Winter hikers in Rouge National Urban Park in Toronto.

 

When shooting I overexposed by 2/3 stops over the camera meter reading to place the snow in the upper quarter tones.

 

When shooting groups of people if they overlap with a sharp confusing background or overlap each other, their outlines become less readily readable. 3 people start to look like two people with 3 legs each or two heads. So I waited, and also changed shooting position, until people outlines separated visually.

 

In Adobe Camera Raw I remapped the sensor information to add a cold blue cast to the mid-tones. Applied vignette slight over correction to lighten corners more than usual. Raised the luminance and saturation of the yellows only. Cloned out a few soft dark bare spots on the snowy road that looked like so many out of focus birds. Left the footprints in.

 

Submitted 3 horizontals and 3 verticals, 2 of which had lots of sky/snow  to give room for type top and bottom.

 

Came back the next day for a second try, but the city ruined the location by plowing the road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No snow in Liverpool yet, Bill. But we have fog sitting low on the River Mersey.

 

heavy-fog-on-the-river-mersey-in-liverpo

Edited by Ed Rooney
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Island Lagoon, a vast salt lake near Woomera, South Australia.

 

2APY61J.jpg

 

2APY615.jpg

 

2APY5WW.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a few of these still left in New Zealand- they don't rot!

2APJK6W.jpg2AMBHHG.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crested Pigeon (Ocyphaps lophotes)

 

2APY5R6.jpg

 

A rare Yellow-footed Rock Wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus)

 

2APY5M9.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, spacecadet said:

Quite a few of these still left in New Zealand- they don't rot!

2APJK6W.jpg2AMBHHG.jpg

 

Nice !

That top one looks to be in fine fettle. Bottom one looks great too.

I wonder how they last so well over there ?  mild wet climate like GB, the old cars soon turn in to rust buckets !

There's a couple of these for sale on a classic car website at present, one for £8k, the other for £12,000.

It'll take a while to get one with Alamy sales tho..

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, AlbertSnapper said:

 

Nice !

 

I wonder how they last so well over there ?  mild wet climate like GB, the old cars soon turn in to rust buckets !

 

 

You're right about the rainfall- I was surprised. Maybe because they don't have to salt the roads?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.