Recommended Posts

I'm wondering if anyone is successfully using a digital slide copier / duplicator instead of a conventional dedicated scanner for Alamy. I've heard that digital copiers can actually yield better results. There is a slew of inexpensive ones on e-bay. Any advice on a good copier to buy? Hints on how to use them?

 

This is the type of gizmo I'm referring to:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/55mm-Slide-Copier-To-Digital-Picture-Converter-New-/130836367462

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at that price, suck it & see. Consistent illumination would be a starting point. Scanning software would also be an issue. If you only want to want to rescue a few old favourites  perhaps worth a try, but don't expect the same results as from a dedicated film scanner. Might be a whole lot of post processing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As usual David K's your man. I believe an Illumitran is a good starting point.

I've experimented with extension tubes and an old prime lens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a stack of 5 x 4 perspex sheets, dense opal 4mm, and have them in store (protected). Although they don't cure dust and scratches the way a scanner does, with my new A7R they achieve a 100MB 'scan' with fantastic colour and less grain aliasing. I have a vintage Pentax bellows with copier for 35mm only, copystand/flash for larger slides. But I still use the Multi Pro scanner despite it taking ages, as it is simply less hassle to stick a slide in and let it roll, and it does a good job of blemish removal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year I purchased this on ebay for appx $60

 

Opteka High Definition II Slide Copier / Duplicator

 

http://www.ebay.com/sch/m.html?_odkw=&_ipg=25&_osacat=0&_armrs=1&_ssn=opteka&_trksid=p2046732.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0&_nkw=Opteka+High+Definition+II+Slide+Copier+%2F+Duplicator&_sacat=0&_from=R40

 

You need to buy the specific mount for your camera.

I'm using it with my Canon 60D and 50mm 1.8 lens.

 

I am using an LED light for video in front shooting I think at iso 200.I shoot in RAW.

 

Works great

 

L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorting out the details, I don't see why that would not work well, Linda.

 

In my back room, all wrapped up (I just touched it to make sure it's still there), I have a Honeywell Repronar, the one that allows you to attach most any SLR body. It uses an electronic flash and a modeling light. 

 

I think this is the model: http://photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/00aESj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I repped photogs in the 80s and 90s I had the comparable film one that had a small flash at the end.I made dupes of almost all slides that got syndicated.

It worked well.I shot on Kodachrome 25 or Kodachrome 64 and in many cases you could not tell the original from the dupe.

I'll see if I can post something next week. I was working on a client archive with this new duper.

L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the one I'm talking about, Linda . . . but there's no reason a DSLR wouldn't work on it. When I interviewed Peter Turner for the Nikon Image Book, he explained to me his whole method of duping Kodachrome to Kodachrome.  :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the one I'm talking about, Linda . . . but there's no reason a DSLR wouldn't work on it. When I interviewed Peter Turner for the Nikon Image Book, he explained to me his whole method of duping Kodachrome to Kodachrome.  :)

I don't have the old one I use to use in the 1980s with my film cameras.I think that may have been a Spiratone though I could be wrong.

 

I had purchased a new one for DSLRs(no flash was included) from Amazon. I like this better with a continuous source of light better than I liked using flash on my old unit in the 80s. It' much quicker and more consistent light. The flash on the old one was very slow and exposures would not always be as spot on as this one. I'm shooting manual.

 

L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm wondering if anyone is successfully using a digital slide copier / duplicator instead of a conventional dedicated scanner for Alamy. I've heard that digital copiers can actually yield better results. There is a slew of inexpensive ones on e-bay. Any advice on a good copier to buy? Hints on how to use them?

 

This is the type of gizmo I'm referring to:

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/55mm-Slide-Copier-To-Digital-Picture-Converter-New-/130836367462

 

Better kit here for less.

 

Interesting article here.

Edited by Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting article Bryan. I have the Kenko zoom slide duplicator but have not used it yet. Clearing some items out of the office so that I will be able to set up the camera with the Kenko and a flash light system, or maybe a continuous light to copy my slides and mono negs. Don't know if the quality will be good enough to pass Alamy QC though.

 

At least I will be able to digitise my negs and slides for the family for when I'm gone. Could be a lot of work for nothing knowing how a lot of people aren't even interested in looking at old family photos. There's a depressing thought.

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of these units described in the links have optics in the attachments. Low cost slide copiers would have me concerned about optics quality. Would it not be possible to rig up a viable light, a slide holder (paper clip?), and shoot with a high quality macro lens?  A cardboard box sealed for light control and perhaps slide mounting might be an acceptable cheap home project. Just another reason for me to buy a macro lens! (No, I have not tried this approach - yet).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Lots of interesting comments, links, and ideas. There is obviously much to consider if going the digital copier route. I've been using a Nikon Super Coolscan 4000 scanner for a long time, but it's starting to act up (again). The last repair job cost me over $500, so I'm looking for an alternative.

 

BTW, does anyone know from recent experience if Alamy QC is still scan-friendly? It has been at least a couple of years since I submitted scans. There were no problems then, but things have changed a lot IME.

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My latest batch of scanned Kodachromes (from the 60s) was accepted last September.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I too have a Nikon Coolscan, the IV (I think). 

 

I've lost the tread on what gear we are talking about at this point. Some of it seems so simple and cheap and other stuff seems very old. 

Edited by Ed Rooney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My latest batch of scanned Kodachromes (from the 60s) was accepted last September.

That's encouraging to hear. I have a few scanned chromes on Alamy. Cloning out the dust spots drove me crazy, and I don't think that any of them have ever sold. Come to think of it, getting rid of dust spots and scratches must be a headache with digital copiers as well. There's a lot to be said for Digital ICE IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John I purchased the Ohnar slide copier (info below) many years ago, have not used it for a while now but the results were favorable and the ones that i submitted to Alamy were accepted.

 

2956.jpg

Click on the image for a larger version.

Most people think of a copy as a print of an existing photograph or slide. However, copying can include any document, flat object or photograph, by conventional methods or videography. Maps, stamps, jewellery, plans, computer printouts, old photos, all lend themselves to copying.

A duplicator or copier can add a whole new look to old slides and forgotten negatives. Owning a duplicator is very handy if you need either to copy a favourite slide for commercial purposes or simply to prevent it from being lost or causing damage when you use it in a presentation. It also gives you the scope to make completely new images by duplicating an enlarged section of the original picture - and this is why you will need a zoom model. If you are clever, you can even salvage a usable section from an otherwise poorly composed image.

We recommend the highly acclaimed Ohnar zoom copier and duplicator range. Being one of the most versatile accessories you can buy, the range consists of three models.

There are now two Zoom copiers. The W-1331 can be used to copy using a film SLR or Digital SLR as long as the sensor is a FX (full frame) version e.g. Nikon D700. The new W-1337 is the same model but just for C sensor digital SLR cameras like most of the Canon models e.g. 1000D. They cover a magnification range of 0.6 to 1.6. At the maximum setting, the area being copied is approximately 1/6th of a full-frame 35mm original. A T2 mount is needed to connect the unit to the SLR body.

The Ohnar copier has a slide carrier for mounted or unmounted slides and negatives. It is quick and easy to use producing impressive results with full 1:1 to 1:2 ranges. Slide sandwich techniques are possible and it is capable of using flash exposures as well as daylight easily. It needs an additional T-Mount to attach it to your film camera but that is the only extra you will need.

Remember to make sure you buy the correct copier matched for your own SLR - if in doubt email us as a product enquiry prior to ordering and we'll be happy to advise you correctly.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bespoke Slide scanners are a thing of past,   get a 50-60mm macro ( I use a Nikon 60mm2.8 AFD ) , a light box or flash, a good clean air source for blowing down, ( I use a mains operated 2hp compressor with a 0-30psi reducer plus a moisture trap and a 4 micron filter).

 

 

It just takes a bit of time to get it right initially, you can then hone everything to your own likings, I cobbled up my own brackets camera stand etc.

 

 

Shoot in RAW at native ISO, you can bracket, merge HDR or whatever, you have full control, I can get better results this way than I did on my Nikon ED5000.  Plus once you've got it set up you can rattle through your slides quicker than anything . Plus plus you can scan K64 superbly which even with the ED5000 was so-so.

 

Hope it helps

 

 

Gary

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the 90s I made thousands of dupes using a homemade duplicator (large wood box, two layers of perspex, top one easily replaceable, enlarger bulb inside, adapted enlarger stand, 1:1 Sigma macro lens, usually attached to an FM2.  I used reversal slide duplicating film.  These were what often went out to clients and worked fine for magazine covers and DPSs.

 

For some reason It never occurred to me that, with a DSLR I could use this as an alternative to a scanner and get as much dynamic range as I want with bracketing - until about a week after I had dropped it off at the recycling centre.

 

:wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Similar approach here--lightbox, paper cut-out frame around the slide, macro lens with extension tubes, camera on copy stand. Once you get it set up, it's very quick. So far, though, have only worked my way to 10-megapixel copies using an 18 mp camera. Got to fill the image space better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Cloning out the dust spots drove me crazy, and I don't think that any of them have ever sold" -- John

 

You want to remove the slide from its mount and clean with PEC-12. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Cloning out the dust spots drove me crazy, and I don't think that any of them have ever sold" -- John

 

You want to remove the slide from its mount and clean with PEC-12. 

Ed, I used to do that when I had my first scanner, which didn't have Digital ICE. When I bought the Coolscan, I switched to using Digital ICE. I find it to be more convenient, and it does a better job (no chance of smearing and ICE cleans up scratches nicely). At the moment, my scanner is starting to do unpredictable things and make odd noises, and I'm not in the mood to throw more money at it. Hence the interest in an alternative.

 

P.S. Prying transparencies out of those old cardboard Kodachrome mounts isn't a lot of fun either.  :wacko:

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the same method thanks to a BJP article by David K. Copy stand, daylight balanced light box, 1:1 macro lens and a De Vere slide insert from an enlarger for holding mounted slides. For colour or monochrome negs, I use card masks pre cut to size with a little weight each end to hold flat. Have had really good results, they are selling and being zoomed....out of seven zooms this week, three are from using this method. Dust and minor scratches have been minimal, the only problem I have found is with very contrasty slides....maybe have to experiment with a pre flash type exposure later.Getting an acceptable colour balance when shooting colour negs can be a bit tricky as well but is ok once you have done a few ! Scanner....no thanks !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now