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Camera quality rejection


Phillip
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I have a Panasonic Lumix fz2500, and all the pictures I try to upload, get rejected because of camera quality.

 

I shoot in RAW and convert to JPEG, do I need to upgrade my camera or is there something I am not doing?

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Stop wasting your time, it's probably on the Alamy blacklist. Even if it weren't, a camera  with 1" sensor and a long fixed zoom will probably never pass QC.

I see that dpreview describes the lens as "soft".

Edited by spacecadet
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Phillip, see:

https://www.alamy.com/blog/alamys-rough-guide-to-digital-cameras

 

1" sensor should be fine, but I note this is a bridge camera and marketed for video capture rather than still photographs. Probably not good enough, but you could always confirm by emailing Alamy directly.

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Phillip, may I suggest that you carefully check all your settings. No ND filtering, low ISO, raw, not raw+jpeg, no added sharpening and dozens of others. Same with your raw processing - make sure you're not adding or removing too much. And of course, make sure you're not re-processing the in-camera jpeg. If you have questions about individual settings, post them here. This group has at least a few experts on these topics.

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They're rejecting images because of the camera. Find a different camera. No hassle, no fuss.

 

If they allow it in you will be rejecting a lot of images when you do your 100% check. 😉

Edited by Mr Standfast
Tidy up
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Depending on your budget, there are some completely acceptable older cameras that have passed QC when I've submitted photos from them: Nikon D300, first generation Sony a7 and Sony a6000, and carefully selected shots from a Nikon D50.   The Sony a6000 has several users with portfolios on Alamy.   Micro 43rds cameras can do the job, but not all shots from my Panasonic GF1 would pass.  

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My Canon T4i (650) still takes great shots and most of my port was taken with this camera.  I'm sure you can get a good used one at a decent price.  I still use it along with my Sony RX100ii. My main camera now is a Canon 90D.

 

Jill

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7 hours ago, Brian Yarvin said:

Phillip, may I suggest that you carefully check all your settings. No ND filtering, low ISO, raw, not raw+jpeg, no added sharpening and dozens of others. Same with your raw processing - make sure you're not adding or removing too much. And of course, make sure you're not re-processing the in-camera jpeg. If you have questions about individual settings, post them here. This group has at least a few experts on these topics.

I don't use the ND filtering, my ISO is usually 125 or 200. I shot in raw and don't really do any sharpening or editing.  The last time I was doing a lot of photography Kodachrome 24 and 64 were the go-to in 35 mm.

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5 hours ago, Mr Standfast said:

They're rejecting images because of the camera. Find a different camera. No hassle, no fuss.

 

If they allow it in you will be rejecting a lot of images when you do your 100% check. 😉

That's my thought as well, but at present well and truly outside my budget

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5 hours ago, Rebecca Ore said:

Depending on your budget, there are some completely acceptable older cameras that have passed QC when I've submitted photos from them: Nikon D300, first generation Sony a7 and Sony a6000, and carefully selected shots from a Nikon D50.   The Sony a6000 has several users with portfolios on Alamy.   Micro 43rds cameras can do the job, but not all shots from my Panasonic GF1 would pass.  

 

I have just started looking at what camera's would give me a better chance of passing the QC, this is all a big learning curve for me. 

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Phillip, while I still believe that posting sample images and engaging the technical skills of this group are an important first step, I'd like to suggest that you also rent at least one camera and try shooting and submitting with it before you buy anything. 

 

And  a second question ... what software are you using for raw conversion? 

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1 hour ago, Phillip said:

That's my thought as well, but at present well and truly outside my budget

 

Fair enough. The Panasonic is still a good camera, just not for Alamy, don't let this hiccup put you off photography, that would never do. All the best.

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5 hours ago, Mr Standfast said:

 

Fair enough. The Panasonic is still a good camera, just not for Alamy, don't let this hiccup put you off photography, that would never do. All the best.

 

I was very passionate about photography years ago, but life got in the way, now I have rediscovered it and in many ways, it is much cheaper. I use to develop my own B&W Film and prints, dabble a bit with Cibachrome but never perfected it. I still have my old cameras and some dark room equipment.

Edited by Phillip
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5 hours ago, Brian Yarvin said:

Phillip, while I still believe that posting sample images and engaging the technical skills of this group are an important first step, I'd like to suggest that you also rent at least one camera and try shooting and submitting with it before you buy anything. 

 

And  a second question ... what software are you using for raw conversion? 

 

I using the process in the Camera to convert the files. and I will take the advice about the sample images. Once I figure out how to load them. I do have material accepted by shutterstock.

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2 hours ago, Phillip said:

I using the process in the Camera to convert the files. and I will take the advice about the sample images.

 

It's really better to learn how to process photos in one of the software programs.   I use Adobe Lightroom Classic and occasional Photoshop and DXO.   Since renting cameras is impossible here, I don't think about that.  Renting or buying, handle the camera before buying.  Most of my cameras have been used newer models.

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6 hours ago, Phillip said:

 

I was very passionate about photography years ago, but life got in the way, now I have rediscovered it and in many ways, it is much cheaper. I use to develop my own B&W Film and prints, dabble a bit with Cibachrome but never perfected it. I still have my old cameras and some dark room equipment.

 

Blast from the past there. I also dabbled a bit with Cibachrome but I never perfected it either, and ISTR that it was quite an expensive process to keep getting wrong.

 

Alan

 

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8 minutes ago, Inchiquin said:

 

Blast from the past there. I also dabbled a bit with Cibachrome but I never perfected it either, and ISTR that it was quite an expensive process to keep getting wrong.

 

Alan

 

 

But I love the image it is almost 3d and if my budget ever gets to the point I will print more of my slides.

Edited by Phillip
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6 hours ago, Phillip said:

I using the process in the Camera to convert the files

 

I'm confused, are you using the software provided with your camera to convert your raw files to JPEGs once you've downloaded them onto your computer? Or are you converting raw files to JPEGs in camera?

 

If the latter, then you're not doing any image editing? That's also not going to help with passing Alamy QC.

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Just now, Steve F said:

 

I'm confused, are you using the software provided with your camera to convert your raw files to JPEGs once you've downloaded them onto your computer? Or are you converting raw files to JPEGs in camera?

 

If the latter, then you're not doing any image editing? That's also not going to help with passing Alamy QC.

I am using the process in the camera. Occasionally I will adjust the exposure and maybe the sharpness but that is all I am doing currently. I don't currently have a computer program to edit images.

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On 08/12/2022 at 12:15, Phillip said:

I am using the process in the camera. Occasionally I will adjust the exposure and maybe the sharpness but that is all I am doing currently. I don't currently have a computer program to edit images.

You are just wasting your time trying to explain yourself.

Just change the camera and go out shooting (with the lens)...

Good luck!

Edited by Ognyan Yosifov
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Maybe get a Sony a6000 (crop frame) or an a7 (full frame, equal to old 35mm film frames), adapters for any lenses you still own, and Capture One Sony Express software, free if you have a Sony.   Fuji cameras are also an option and Capture One Express comes in Fuji flavor.

 

If you need to do something to make reliable money, stock photography probably isn't a good choice.  

 

B&H has used a6000 cameras for around $280 body only and $490 like new with lens.  At least three Alamy regular posters to this forum have them.   The like new with the lens might be a good buy.   I've always found B&H Photo to be reliable.  If you're in the UK, probably somewhere local would have similar prices. 

 

The Capture One Express for Sony or Fuji may be going away soon. 

 

 

 

 

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31 minutes ago, Rebecca Ore said:

Maybe get a Sony a6000 (crop frame) or an a7 (full frame, equal to old 35mm film frames), adapters for any lenses you still own, and Capture One Sony Express software, free if you have a Sony.   Fuji cameras are also an option and Capture One Express comes in Fuji flavor.

 

If you need to do something to make reliable money, stock photography probably isn't a good choice.  

 

B&H has used a6000 cameras for around $280 body only and $490 like new with lens.  At least three Alamy regular posters to this forum have them.   The like new with the lens might be a good buy.   I've always found B&H Photo to be reliable.  If you're in the UK, probably somewhere local would have similar prices. 

 

The Capture One Express for Sony or Fuji may be going away soon. 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't need to make reliable money, I am using stock as a learning experience plus creating a portfolio. 

 

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9 hours ago, Phillip said:

I am using the process in the camera. Occasionally I will adjust the exposure and maybe the sharpness but that is all I am doing currently. I don't currently have a computer program to edit images.

 

If budget is tight and you are serious about learning the art and craft of digital photography, my advice would be to keep the camera for now and focus on learning about how to process images on a computer. That camera is not bad at all from the reviews I have read and should be perfectly adequate for learning even if it is not on Alamy's list of acceptable cameras (which may or may not exist any more in any case). What sort of computer do you own (if any)?

 

 

Edited by MDM
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4 hours ago, Rebecca Ore said:

Maybe get a Sony a6000 (crop frame) or an a7 (full frame, equal to old 35mm film frames), adapters for any lenses you still own, and Capture One Sony Express software, free if you have a Sony.   Fuji cameras are also an option and Capture One Express comes in Fuji flavor.

 

If you need to do something to make reliable money, stock photography probably isn't a good choice.  

 

B&H has used a6000 cameras for around $280 body only and $490 like new with lens.  At least three Alamy regular posters to this forum have them.   The like new with the lens might be a good buy.   I've always found B&H Photo to be reliable.  If you're in the UK, probably somewhere local would have similar prices. 

 

The Capture One Express for Sony or Fuji may be going away soon.

 

 

+1 especially for the original Sony A7 plus one or more simple adapters for lenses you already have. It will be the closest you can get to the look and feel of the old cameras. Plus it will have most of the things up it's sleeve you'll want from a modern digital mirrorless body. Except the image stabilization. That would cost an extra 50-100 euros/dollars/pounds (it's almost the same nowadays) for the A7markII.

 

Alternatively look for a different outlet where they do accept the images from your current camera. They may reject images for a lot of different reasons than they do here though. Like: we already have loads of those; these won't ever sell etc etc. Which may be even more of learning experience than maybe waiting a long time before you start selling stuff over here. (Which is what some people coming from the big micros are complaining about here.)

 

wim

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16 hours ago, Phillip said:

I am using the process in the camera. Occasionally I will adjust the exposure and maybe the sharpness but that is all I am doing currently. I don't currently have a computer program to edit images.

 

Phillip, while I can't tell you what's wrong without seeing images, I can guess from long experience that this is your problem. Process a few raws in ACR, On1, or even Capture 1 using recommended Alamy settings and see if this doesn't solve the problem. 

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