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Hi All,

 

I have done a search here in the forum and cannot find any answers though it has probably been discussed before.  Can we sell photos of objects/artworks in museums?  Sculptures in museums and in public squares?  Diego Rivera or Orozco mural details?  Ancient temple artifacts and details?

 

How does that work?  I see a lot of people selling this kind of stuff but reluctant to upload myself until I understand the rules.

 

I have tons of it.

 

Kristin

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Posted (edited)

I believe Alamy has issued guidelines about submitting such imagery (don't have the link though), saying it is OK,  providing there is additional context within the image. So a photo of an artwork just by itself is not wanted by Alamy  (copyright violation etc), but a photo of such artwork with, for example, people viewing it (perhaps a tour group) is acceptable. Suggest you do a search on the Alamy blog or Twitter pages for further clarification. Also, I think Alamy suggest any such submissions from photographers should be marked as for editorial use only, ie, no marketing, commercial use.

Edited by Phil Preston
Extra info added.

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2 minutes ago, Phil Preston said:

I believe Alamy has issued guidelines about submitting such imagery (don't have the link though), saying it is OK,  providing there is additional context within the image. So a photo of an artwork just by itself is not wanted by Alamy  (copyright violation etc), but a photo of such artwork with, for example, people viewing it (perhaps a tour group) is acceptable. Suggest you do a search on the Alamy blog or Twitter pages for further clarification. 

 

Thanks!  I was just thinking I could maybe find this information elsewhere on this site.  I have heard about including context when photographing street art, that makes sense.  But I see all kinds of shots and details (without context) of artworks and artifacts on here, so a bit confused.

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I have noticed within Alamys Image Manager that there is now a checkbox for imagery within the 'public domain', so that might (???) explain some imagery on Alamy that does not appear to conform to the guidelines. Still suggest you look for the Alamy guidelines on their Blog or Twitter pages rather than asking in the forum, and if you still have any doubts, go direct to Alamy and ask them for clarification. It does seem to be a slightly grey area.

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6 hours ago, Phil Preston said:

I have noticed within Alamys Image Manager that there is now a checkbox for imagery within the 'public domain', so that might (???) explain some imagery on Alamy that does not appear to conform to the guidelines. Still suggest you look for the Alamy guidelines on their Blog or Twitter pages rather than asking in the forum, and if you still have any doubts, go direct to Alamy and ask them for clarification. It does seem to be a slightly grey area.

 

Images that do not conform to Alamy guidelines are probably there because Alamy aren't aware of them given as Alamy QC do not check every single image. 'Public domain' is referring to images that are already freely available on the Internet, like Creative Commons images, which can be used by anyone without paying a license fee. You would usually need to credit the artist however.

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Seem to recall being de-muraled in the past, or is that a figment of my imagination?

 

 

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Matt Ashmore said:

 

Images that do not conform to Alamy guidelines are probably there because Alamy aren't aware of them given as Alamy QC do not check every single image. 'Public domain' is referring to images that are already freely available on the Internet, like Creative Commons images, which can be used by anyone without paying a license fee. You would usually need to credit the artist however.

 

Many of those images have this line: This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage. All archival images bypass QC altogether.

We have discussed funny images like this one here before.

 

wim

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10 hours ago, The Blinking Eye said:

 Can we sell photos of objects/artworks in museums?  Sculptures in museums and in public squares?  Diego Rivera or Orozco mural details?  Ancient temple artifacts and details?

How does that work?  I see a lot of people selling this kind of stuff but reluctant to upload myself until I understand the rules.

 

As described in the article linked by wiskerke, it all depends on the property rules as well as on national copyright laws which differ substantially from country to country.
I can tell you how it works in Italy.

1) If the museum (in its website, in signage, on the ticket) forbids taking photos or allows taking photos for personal use only, you can't take pictures to be sold on Alamy there.
2) If the museum says nothing about the matter, better you ask. Many museums allow taking pictures for editorial use only and have a precompiled form for that. 
3) If the museum allows taking photos for any use, you are OK, but only in respect of the property copyright. You are possibly still violating the artist's copyright, which is a different matter and mainly depends on national copyright regulations.
4) In Italy, you are not violating any artist's copyright as long as the artist died more than 70 years ago. You are either not violating the artist's copyright if your picture has artistic value in itself (to judge whether a photo depicting an artwork has also an additional "artistic value" or not is a tricky question, honestly).
5) Certain exhibition events (the Venice Biennale, for example) usually allow taking editorial photos of any artwork on show, as long as you are registered as a press photographer and you'll sell such images for editorial use only (I guess that they have an agreement with the featured artists about that point); yet,  at the Biennale, this is true for the two main official exhibitions (at the Arsenale and in the Giardini's Central Pavilion) only, while each national pavilion may have its own, different rules.

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