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I'm a big fan of porridge (a.k.a. oatmeal), so I was heartened to see it included in Alamy's latest Stock Photo Requests e-mail. However, a search for "bowl of porridge" brings up over 15K images. Does this mean that buyers have been unable to find what they need, even with this number of images to choose from? Am I missing something?

 

Then again, my morning bowl of porridge doesn't exactly look like the flowery one featured in the blog post. :D

 

 

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Could be the TV sitcom "Porridge" with comedy genius Ronnie Barker, set in a prison in the UK?

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Maybe they are after the dried stuff before its cooked?  Or I know other countries have things they call porridge that are made with things other than oats.

 

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They want an images looking side on to the bowl containing porridge.

 

How would they know it contained porridge as they would not be able to see it unless it was overflowing.:huh:

 

Allan

 

 

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12 minutes ago, Allan Bell said:

They want an images looking side on to the bowl containing porridge.

 

How would they know it contained porridge as they would not be able to see it unless it was overflowing.:huh:

 

Allan

 

 

 

That's exactly what I thought.  I'm going to give it a go, though.

 

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'porridge overflowing' gives 37 hits, not one of which shows porridge overflowing :wacko:

 

Alan

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7 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

They want an images looking side on to the bowl containing porridge.

 

How would they know it contained porridge as they would not be able to see it unless it was overflowing.:huh:

 

Allan

 

 

 

Sounds like a sticky mess to me. Is there a Mount Porridge somewhere in the UK, in Scotland perhaps? That could be what the buyer was looking for. B)

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17 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Sounds like a sticky mess to me. Is there a Mount Porridge somewhere in the UK, in Scotland perhaps? That could be what the buyer was looking for. B)

 

Have you Googled it?

Or searched on Alamy?:)

 

Allan

 

 

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11 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Have you Googled it?

Or searched on Alamy?:)

 

Allan

 

 

 

No luck finding the fabled Mountain of Porridge, but oatmeal still rules in my book.

Edited by John Mitchell

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10 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

No luck finding the fabled Mountain of Porridge, but oatmeal still rules in my book.

 

That is the basis of "Porridge". It is crushed oats (1/2 cup) and milk (1 cup) heated and stirred in a saucepan until nice and gooey then add salt and/or sugar to taste. True porridge as consumed by the Scottish only has salt added. It can be done in the microwave too but has to be left to soak a while before heating.

 

Allan

 

 

Edited by Allan Bell

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Touch of frost on the grass this morning when I took the dog out, so it must almost be porridge time again! I like mine with blueberries on top - no sugar or salt despite being an exiled Scot!

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Well I'm completely ashamed! I have almost all those images on Alamy but lack the fine British keyword porridge. Back to AIM this morning!!

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5 hours ago, David McGill said:

Touch of frost on the grass this morning when I took the dog out, so it must almost be porridge time again! I like mine with blueberries on top - no sugar or salt despite being an exiled Scot!

 

Hi David, I have not tried porridge with blueberries on top yet but it sounds goooood.

 

Allan

 

 

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I love overnight oats made with porridge oats, milk and Greek yogurt.  Leave it in the fridge overnight and it's gorgeous for breakfast.

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I put oats in to a saucepan the night before, with water, then allow to soak overnight. Heat up in the morning with some sugar added. I eat it straight out of the hot saucepan. Love the stuff.

 

A couple of years ago whilst heating it up on the hob at 5 in the morning, a dark brown 'thing' appeared and popped up from inside the porridge. It was a slug !

I scooped it out then carried on stirring. But eventually I felt sick so threw the lot out instead of eating  it !

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14 minutes ago, AlbertSnapper said:

I put oats in to a saucepan the night before, with water, then allow to soak overnight. Heat up in the morning with some sugar added. I eat it straight out of the hot saucepan. Love the stuff.

 

A couple of years ago whilst heating it up on the hob at 5 in the morning, a dark brown 'thing' appeared and popped up from inside the porridge. It was a slug !

I scooped it out then carried on stirring. But eventually I felt sick so threw the lot out instead of eating  it !

 

Thanks for sharing... :wacko:

 

I'll check my porridge more closely from now on.

 

P.S. Don't the French call it escargot?

Edited by John Mitchell

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6 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

 

P.S. Don't the French call it escargot?

 

Escargots are what the French call their edible snails.

I was in a French truckstop recently and saw a large bowl of them. Not my cup of tea.

Plenty of escargots to look at here on Alamy.

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Here's the bad news: 

 

Slugs (and snails) are host to a potentially dangerous parasite called the rat lungworm. They contract this parasite by eating the feces of infected rodents. If a human eats raw snail or slug, these parasites will not live in their body, but it can produce a toxic reaction called eosinophilic meningitis.

 

The good news is I have three images on page one of that search, and five more on page two.

 

a-bowl-of-porridge-and-blueberries-M3AGP.

 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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4 minutes ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Slugs (and snails) are host to a potentially dangerous parasite called the rat lungworm. They contract this parasite by eating the feces of infected rodents.

 

 

With Ed's and my post this thread is turning in to a horror story !

 

Thanks for the info Ed. Just been reading up on eosinophilic meningitis . Can be nasty.

 

 

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To me, a slug is just a snail without a mortgage. I'm sticking with Edo's recipe. Looks delicious.

Edited by John Mitchell

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a-bowl-of-porridge-and-fruit-M3AGR8.jpg

 

 

In addition to the mixed fruit you see here, I've added some vanilla yogurt . . . and summer disappeared today, so here in French Canada it is now porridge weather. 

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Tasty looking oatmeal  Ed!

 

I think there's going to be a lot more porridge photos showing up on alamy soon.:)

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5 hours ago, MariaJ said:

Tasty looking oatmeal  Ed!

 

I think there's going to be a lot more porridge photos showing up on alamy soon.:)

 

Yes, Edo certainly knows his oats.

 

Expect an avalanche of oatmeal coming this way very soon...

Edited by John Mitchell

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5 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 

Yes, Edo certainly knows his oats.

 

 

There's a grain of truth in that.

 

Alan

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17 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Hi David, I have not tried porridge with blueberries on top yet but it sounds goooood.

 

 

I cook mine with the blueberries in. As well as releasing the flavour into the porridge it also leaves pretty purple trails throughout the bowl. I also include sultanas, and sometimes slice a banana on top.

 

Alan

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