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I am not criticising Alamy here but wonder what happens when our images are failed by one of the examiners in the QC department.

 

For instance we are told by Alamy that their QC staff are all photographers so no computers involved. Now what happens if someone arrives for work with a blinding hangover and cannot focus on their screen properly, - ANOTHER fail.

 

Is there a fallback or double checking system in operation so someone else, maybe with more experience even, takes a look at the failed batch/image to confirm fail or countermand the fail and let it go through?

 

Just pointing out the vagaries of a manual system and the fact that there should be, if not already, a failsafe in operation.

 

Allan

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I expect they QC a sample of QC decisions. If a particular spotter shows signs of deviation from the norm he or she is summarily executed offered words of advice. it's only us photographers who have no right of appeal.

You're not in the bin again, are you? I'm in solitary so i can't tell. I expect a hosedown on the 30th.

Edited by spacecadet
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Sorry to hear you are back in again.

 

Thanks for your concern Mark. I am out on parole at the moment and have uploaded two lots which passed. Awaiting decision of third upload.

 

Those ice cold hose-downs are not much fun.

 

Allan

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I haven't had a fail in quite a while, but just wondered what were the reasons for fails.  I think the last one I had was the SOLD.

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My pass rate was back up over 90% but no mercy, straight back in for the full 30-day stretch.

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I doubt that with the volume of submissions Alamy receives, they have time to double check failed images. However, I've found that member services has been pretty good about supplying more info about why a particular image failed. In one case, they even sent me 100% crops. Fortunately, I haven't had to ask them about anything lately (touch wood).

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My experience of quality control regimes is that the main concern in most cases is false positives, not false negatives. From a business' perspective, the potential commercial repercussions of a shonky image being passed are exponentially higher than a good image failing.

 

Doesn't preclude Alamy from having double-checking on "fails" of course, but it may not be as high a priority as many would hope.

 

dd

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...and the occasional hangover probably works in our favour. B)

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I doubt that with the volume of submissions Alamy receives, they have time to double check failed images.

 

 

I'm not so sure. Doesn't Alamy say that 97% of submissions pass, or something like that? That means only 3% would need to be double-checked, and then only ever one image from each submission. Since the reason for failure will be known, in most cases a cursory glance should confirm it.

 

Alan

Edited by Inchiquin
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I doubt that with the volume of submissions Alamy receives, they have time to double check failed images.

 

 

I'm not so sure. Doesn't Alamy say that 97% of submissions pass, or something like that? That means only 3% would need to be double-checked, and then only ever one image from each submission. Since the reason for failure will be known, in most cases a cursory glance should confirm it.

 

Alan

 

 

Or hopefully refute it.

 

Allan   (with a double "L")

 

Perhaps Alamy would like to say a word on this matter?

 

Me again

Edited by Allan Bell

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It's impossible to know what goes on behind the scenes. However, I imagine that QC inspectors sometimes ask their colleagues for a second opinion if they aren't 100% sure about something. No?  As Alan (with a single "L") mentioned, all that might be required is a quick glance.

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I doubt that with the volume of submissions Alamy receives, they have time to double check failed images.

 

 

I'm not so sure. Doesn't Alamy say that 97% of submissions pass, or something like that? That means only 3% would need to be double-checked, and then only ever one image from each submission. Since the reason for failure will be known, in most cases a cursory glance should confirm it.

 

Alan

 

 

True, I was thinking more in terms of having an official "double-checking" system in place for all images submitted, which I thought was what Allan (with a double "L") had in mind. Such a system could really slow things down.

Edited by John Mitchell

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Perhaps Alamy adopt the same strategy that many here do: if you have to ask, reject.

 

dd

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Putting the fear of Go... QC into everyone is probably the most effective approach. I certainly admit to extreme paranoia! Not too much of an issue considering my tiny number of submissions.

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I find it always helps to take a QC pill prior to post processing….  :lol: !

 

white-pill-engraved-with-the-letters-qc-

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I expect they QC a sample of QC decisions. If a particular spotter shows signs of deviation from the norm he or she is summarily executed offered words of advice. it's only us photographers who have no right of appeal.

You're not in the bin again, are you? I'm in solitary so i can't tell. I expect a hosedown on the 30th.

 

You are not alone! I am in the bin too. I suspect I managed to upload an image intended for microstock.

 

QC bin is.. um.. irritating.. in that a single fail stops all QC for a month - or so it seems. I have 8 uploads waiting since April 17 for what may be just 1 image mistake.

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They will all be failed together. You stop uploading when you suspect a fail. MS will confirm it.

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I shot hundreds of pictures in St. Croix 18 months ago.  I processed some of them right away, but there were so many....I've just gotten around to working on the rest, lots and lots of deletions, lots of processing.  Since I've been shooting with my X-T1 and having QC success, I am nervous processing images, like these, shot with other cameras.  I just uploaded a batch, and will be chewing fingernails until (hopefully) they pass.

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They will all be failed together. You stop uploading when you suspect a fail. MS will confirm it.

 

You are correct. All 8 uploads failed with only 1 file commented of all. LOL.

I guess lesson learned is to upload only 1 and wait for results. Can't remember it being this way before.  :huh:

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Always been the policy IIRC. I've occasionally made the mistake and faultless subs have been failed together with the offending ones.

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They will all be failed together. You stop uploading when you suspect a fail. MS will confirm it.

 

 

You are correct. All 8 uploads failed with only 1 file commented of all. LOL.

I guess lesson learned is to upload only 1 and wait for results. Can't remember it being this way before.  :huh:

Mike, is your brain tumor growing? :) kidding...

It has always been this way, at least for years. Maybe this is just the first time you've had a fail with multiple uploads, which means you've a good QC record.

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Going back to the beginning of this thread it would appear that mods are handing out red arrows. :D

 

Allan

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Going back to the beginning of this thread it would appear that mods are handing out red arrows. :D

 

Allan

That's rather alarming. Perhaps Alamy could reassure us.

I've replaced yours BTW.

Edited by spacecadet
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Why would moderators do that? The immediate fun one may momentarily obtain, drunk or sober, is heavily outweighed by the great disadvantage of the bad reputation. "He or she would be offered words of advice"

 

No, more likely a member (not me, I don't do red arrows) who cannot see the enormous problem in passing the quality control, and may see this as an unjust remark to the job the curators are doing. If a mistake is made an e-mail to member service will have the image approved, I am quite sure.

 

I respect you "guys" and your advice and discussions very much, but have difficulties in seeing why you cannot adapt your work routines to not failing more than at very rare occasions. (Perhaps unless you are experimenting and trying out an image on the borderline).

 

I should probably not have said this. Hybris and Nemesis will most likely make me fail a lot in the future, and my reputation will be full of red arrows, and the Internet doesn't forget.

Edited by Niels Quist
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Going back to the beginning of this thread it would appear that mods are handing out red arrows. :D

 

Allan

That's rather alarming. Perhaps Alamy could reassure us.

I've replaced yours BTW.

 

 

Thanks Mark, replaced both of yours too. I am still one down but of no concern.

 

Allan

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