Jump to content

February 2022 - Favourite uploads


cbimages

Recommended Posts

8 hours ago, cbimages said:

More of the usual from me. Three tiny treehoppers - they grow to around 5mm. Female in the middle and two boys both wanting to mate on either side of her. And A turreted wrap around spider, another "biggie" at 8mm. It has tried to wrap silk around a reasonably large millipede, but the milli had other plans than being a spider meal.  I was checking a bush and saw a bit of commotion as milli started to make its escape. Then, more sex from a pair of leaf beetles - they are about 10mm long, and finishing with a ridiculously large caterpillar around 5cm long....a veritable monster!

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are breathtaking, but can I ask how you manage to get more than a couple of mm DoF? My macro's sweet spot is around f11, it's not much use below 22 and sharpeninp up in LR isn't good enough.. Not having had proper kit before my technique isn't up to much.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, spacecadet said:

These are breathtaking, but can I ask how you manage to get more than a couple of mm DoF? My macro's sweet spot is around f11, it's not much use below 22 and sharpeninp up in LR isn't good enough.. Not having had proper kit before my technique isn't up to much.

Thanks spacecadet, you are too kind! I shoot mainly on F22. iso 100, 1/200th. Now using an image stabilised lens (but not for most of this recent upload). With IS lens, I sometimes go to 1/125th for larger subjects and F16. I'm using a Canon 5D mark 2  - so full frame. My right arm is quite weak from the four cancer surgeries, so I tend to err on the side of caution with shutter speed. and also allow for slight air movement/breeze too.  I use a single focal point, generally the middle one, but sometimes one of the others, when I need to concentrate on the face or eye. Lighting is a Canon Macro Twin Lite MT 24EX. Everything bought second hand.

My husband (aka "the sherpa"), carries a small backpack with some backgrounds in it - made from the side panel of a diet coke carton! And last week I bought some kiddies paints and have been experimenting with some different colours.. He also carries one of those "grab" sticks the elderly use to pick things up from the floor. It serves 2 purposes, firstly, it helps his nearly 82 year old legs to walk more steadily over uneven ground, but it's intended purpose was to hold branches down, or out of the way etc. Having an willing assistant is paramount for me. He's also very useful for pulling leeches off me before they get a good hold.........yuk!!!!

I shoot macro underwater about 95% of the time too, so I guess it's almost second nature to me. But looking back to some of my above water RAWs from a few months ago, I can see that I have improved greatly, both with lighting and technique. so do keep at it!

Edited by cbimages
  • Thanks 1
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, gvallee said:

 

Brilliant collection again Carol, I especially like the wraparound spider and the millipede. You have a knack to show the tiny ones doing something interesting. Hope they sell soon!

 

Thanks Gen, even if they never sell, I'm keeping busy, exercising, keeping my spirits up and also learning so much. I love your osprey with fish image, a great capture.

  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, NYCat said:

Ohhhh, Gen. Fabulous images.

 

Paulette

 

Wow Paulette! CONGRATULATIONS for having your polar bear selected in Alamy tweet 'Animals in Action'. Only 100 images selected out of the whole database and you're one of them. That's an achievement. Well deserved.

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, Gen. That little character is definitely my best seller. And the experience of the trip was amazing. We saw many more polar bears than most trips offer. Lots of cubs.

 

Paulette

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wet weather is keeping us housebound and allowing me time to do some processing. Here's some from a recent upload. Common Blue Damselflies mating and also with prey in mouth. A stunning caterpillar and a large March Fly, that had just bitten my husband on the leg and drawn blood. he swatted it off, it fell into the leaf litter, stunned but was still crawling.

common-bluetail-damselfly-ischnura-heter

common-bluetail-damselfly-ischnura-heter

wattle-notodontid-moth-caterpillar-neola

reddish-brown-march-fly-cydistomyia-ferg

  • Love 1
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So many great shots - Carol your macros are especially amazing (though I want to be at the beach with Gen)!

 

I've been trying to shoot more macro and am struggling with it and realize I need to shoot faster - so have been boosting my ISO but am thinking a ring light would probably be my best best - will have to call the used department at B&H and see what they'd recommend (I have a Sony a7rii and a7riv). I spent a lot on a new camera last year and should get a new iMac, so used seems to be the smart way to go. I wish I could upgrade my 2011 iMac sufficiently. Camera equipment lasts so much longer than computers.

 

I know so little about lights for macro - can you use it for butterflies or do the lights scare them off? I've been selling nature images to healthcare facilities lately so while bugs are fascinating, and great for stock, my primary aim when it comes to bugs are the prettier ones. And what about bees? Will the light encourage them to sting you? Seriously, I'm clueless. I assume a ring light will help for flowers too. I really need to read up more on it, but if you've got any tips, much appreciated.

 

Carol, I have to say your images are as impressive as your attitude! Hope the treatment is tremendously helpful and that your forays into nature help too. And Betty, hoping you heal up well and can get back to stooping and shooting.

 

I'm planning to start my seeds indoors this weekend to get my garden going this spring and all those awesome macros are really inspiring!

 

Edit: So, Carol, is your light LED? Are those better since they give continuous light? It's been about twenty years since I bought any kind of strobe/flash and LED didn't even come to mind until I started researching. Clueless here but going to learn.

Edited by Marianne
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Marianne said:

So many great shots - Carol your macros are especially amazing (though I want to be at the beach with Gen)!

 

I've been trying to shoot more macro and am struggling with it and realize I need to shoot faster - so have been boosting my ISO but am thinking a ring light would probably be my best best - will have to call the used department at B&H and see what they'd recommend (I have a Sony a7rii and a7riv). I spent a lot on a new camera last year and should get a new iMac, so used seems to be the smart way to go. I wish I could upgrade my 2011 iMac sufficiently. Camera equipment lasts so much longer than computers.

 

I know so little about lights for macro - can you use it for butterflies or do the lights scare them off? I've been selling nature images to healthcare facilities lately so while bugs are fascinating, and great for stock, my primary aim when it comes to bugs are the prettier ones. And what about bees? Will the light encourage them to sting you? Seriously, I'm clueless. I assume a ring light will help for flowers too. I really need to read up more on it, but if you've got any tips, much appreciated.

 

Carol, I have to say your images are as impressive as your attitude! Hope the treatment is tremendously helpful and that your forays into nature help too. And Betty, hoping you heal up well and can get back to stooping and shooting.

 

I'm planning to start my seeds indoors this weekend to get my garden going this spring and all those awesome macros are really inspiring!

 

Edit: So, Carol, is your light LED? Are those better since they give continuous light? It's been about twenty years since I bought any kind of strobe/flash and LED didn't even come to mind until I started researching. Clueless here but going to learn.

 

Marianne, I cannot help you with Sony equipment for macro lights but in general, a ring flash is not a good idea. A horrible circle shows in the subject eyes. Canon and Nikon have different systems. This is my set up with my Nikon, the Commander kit.

Here, here and here. 

 

Each flash comes with a little stand if you want to mount it elsewhere than on the camera. I have a third one which I sometimes place behind the subject when its colour is very dark. 

 

I also sometimes use a gorilla pod clamped to my tripod. In the picture enclosed, there was an insect on the leaf. I find insects a lot more cooperative than birds. Usually you can relocate them without too many problems. The issue is with jumping spiders: they love to hop on the lens or tripod. Stay still for a minute will you!?

 

I didn't find that insects mind the flash. I shoot repeatedly at close range and they're still posing for me. I shot the close-up of the paper wasp below literally touching it. A whole series. It never complained.

 

Examples of shots taken with this set up:

Here, here,  here,  here, here, here

 

Edited by gvallee
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Marianne said:

So many great shots - Carol your macros are especially amazing (though I want to be at the beach with Gen)!

 

I've been trying to shoot more macro and am struggling with it and realize I need to shoot faster - so have been boosting my ISO but am thinking a ring light would probably be my best best - will have to call the used department at B&H and see what they'd recommend (I have a Sony a7rii and a7riv). I spent a lot on a new camera last year and should get a new iMac, so used seems to be the smart way to go. I wish I could upgrade my 2011 iMac sufficiently. Camera equipment lasts so much longer than computers.

 

I know so little about lights for macro - can you use it for butterflies or do the lights scare them off? I've been selling nature images to healthcare facilities lately so while bugs are fascinating, and great for stock, my primary aim when it comes to bugs are the prettier ones. And what about bees? Will the light encourage them to sting you? Seriously, I'm clueless. I assume a ring light will help for flowers too. I really need to read up more on it, but if you've got any tips, much appreciated.

 

Carol, I have to say your images are as impressive as your attitude! Hope the treatment is tremendously helpful and that your forays into nature help too. And Betty, hoping you heal up well and can get back to stooping and shooting.

 

I'm planning to start my seeds indoors this weekend to get my garden going this spring and all those awesome macros are really inspiring!

 

Edit: So, Carol, is your light LED? Are those better since they give continuous light? It's been about twenty years since I bought any kind of strobe/flash and LED didn't even come to mind until I started researching. Clueless here but going to learn.

Thanks for the kind words Marianne. I totally agree with Gen about a ring flash. I had one for many years, and you can certainly get away with it sometimes, but the circle of light is not so good most of the time. Mine was an old Sunpak, and I recently gave it away to a friend. She offered some $$ for it, but I was able to show her they sell for very little. 

I now use the Canon Macro Twin Lite MT 24EX. I has two lights easily moved and you can change the output levels individually etc, although I rarely do, sometimes I  have one at a different angle. I handhold for my photography. Most of the stuff I shoot won't stay still long enough to set up a tripod. So in some ways similar to Gen's setup.

I've never had an issue with anything getting upset by the light, except rarely if an insect etc has big eyes and I shoot a of shots, they sometimes turn away, or rub an arm over their eye. Praying mantis don't care for too much light. but I've never had anything become aggressive.

Gen, I'm laughing, jumping spiders that turn their back to you get me!!!!!

  • Love 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) 

 

2HT05YR.jpg

 

Gilbert's honeyeaters (Melithreptus chloropsis)

 

2HT05YW.jpg

 

Rosenberg's Monitor (Varanus rosenbergi) 

 

2HT05WP.jpg

 

Domestic Alpacas

 

2HT05Y0.jpg

 

Kelpie or Australian sheep dog

 

2HT05TD.jpg

 

2HT05WD.jpg

 

 

Edited by gvallee
  • Love 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Hey, we have exotic creatures here too! Just the other day, I came upon two rare Merseyside pigeons (Pigionus Merseywetnous). I didn't get a shot. They grabbed my fry and disappeared behind the Sir Ringo statue at the docks. Oh, they're quick!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, cbimages said:

Thanks for the kind words Marianne. I totally agree with Gen about a ring flash. I had one for many years, and you can certainly get away with it sometimes, but the circle of light is not so good most of the time. Mine was an old Sunpak, and I recently gave it away to a friend. She offered some $$ for it, but I was able to show her they sell for very little. 

I now use the Canon Macro Twin Lite MT 24EX. I has two lights easily moved and you can change the output levels individually etc, although I rarely do, sometimes I  have one at a different angle. I handhold for my photography. Most of the stuff I shoot won't stay still long enough to set up a tripod. So in some ways similar to Gen's setup.

I've never had an issue with anything getting upset by the light, except rarely if an insect etc has big eyes and I shoot a of shots, they sometimes turn away, or rub an arm over their eye. Praying mantis don't care for too much light. but I've never had anything become aggressive.

Gen, I'm laughing, jumping spiders that turn their back to you get me!!!!!

 

You show some amazing macro bug shots. Do you use a long macro lens, such as 180mm, to lessen the chance of disturbing the insects? I have a Nikon 60mm and Tamron 90mm macro lenses, wondering if I would need to attach an extension tube on the 90mm for small insects?

Edited by sb photos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ed Rooney said:

 

Hey, we have exotic creatures here too! Just the other day, I came upon two rare Merseyside pigeons (Pigionus Merseywetnous). I didn't get a shot. They grabbed my fry and disappeared behind the Sir Ringo statue at the docks. Oh, they're quick!

 

UsWetToo! Mucho. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I resubmitted this but did a search for what it might be if it wasn't a baby Asian House gecko.   Turned out to be something more exotic.  Checked a number of sites to be sure.  It reminded me to never assume I knew my lizards.  Another gecko that spread around the global tropics because all it takes is one female.  A Mourning Gecko (Lepidodactylus lugubris),against a red ceiling tile.  This species is parthenogenetic.

 

2HR1D9P.jpg

  • Love 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, sb photos said:

 

You show some amazing macro bug shots. Do you use a long macro lens, such as 180mm, to lessen the chance of disturbing the insects? I have a Nikon 60mm and Tamron 90mm macro lenses, wondering if I would need to attach an extension tube on the 90mm for small insects?

No, I just use a 100 macro on a full frame camera. Although I do have a 12 & a 25 extension tube to add, they really don't make a huge difference on a full frame camera. Very small things, less than 5mm or so, are almost impossible to get a decent shot of with my setup. If things were different in my life, I might consider getting one of the better Canon crop sensor cameras. I suppose because I'm used to shooting small macro underwater, where, I'm big, bulky and bubble belching, so have learned patience. One thing I always do, it stop and watch a subject, see what it's doing etc. Sometimes I stand for quite a while and slowly approach, but it certainly often doesn't work! Flying insects can be difficult, but some patience and good timing helps. I like to look for dragonflies/damselflies quite early, when they have just woken up and are out and about drying their wings, as an example.


 

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, gvallee said:

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) 

 

2HT05YR.jpg

 

Gilbert's honeyeaters (Melithreptus chloropsis)

 

2HT05YW.jpg

 

Gould's Sand Goanna or Sand Monitor (Varanus gouldii)

 

2HT05WP.jpg

 

Domestic Alpacas

 

2HT05Y0.jpg

 

Kelpie or Australian sheep dog

 

2HT05TD.jpg

 

2HT05WD.jpg

 

 

Gen, I love your Kelpie pics. There's been a recent series on BBC called Muster Dogs, following a litter of kelpie pups through training to 12 months of age. They are beyond clever. And so fearless working with massive beasts.

 

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My latest upload now online. As expected, more macro stuff. A little Jumping Spider on a grass blade, showing the massive eyes, then another the same species which has caught a fly for breakfast, what a feast it will have! Then a Net Casting Spider that has caught the same species of jumping spider and having a lovely meal. Lastly a Dwarf Tree Frog, they grow to 2.5cm.

garden-jumping-spider-opisthoncus-parced

garden-jumping-spider-opisthoncus-parced

female-net-casting-spider-deinopis-subru

eastern-dwarf-tree-frog-litoria-fallax-a

Edited by cbimages
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cbimages said:

Gen, I love your Kelpie pics. There's been a recent series on BBC called Muster Dogs, following a litter of kelpie pups through training to 12 months of age. They are beyond clever. And so fearless working with massive beasts.

 

 

I've heard of the series but haven't seen it. Yesterday I was watching Backroads. They were showing sheep. Bo jumped up and stared intently at the screen. He's such a lovely dog. Very bright and eager to please. He understands lots of commands. We were told that he cannot be tired out, so we follow orders and drive to the farm gate, 1 km away one way, and back twice a day. Bo runs alongside. We've clocked him at 40kph, ears flattened, body shaped like a cheetah. Then he stops, looks back at the car wondering why we're so slow to catch up. 

 

The owners have left us the use of a 4x4 ute, the tray is quite high up. The sides of the tray can be taken down. No fear. Bo jumps into it in one bounce. With his stick in his mouth.

 

The first day, we were wondering if we should close the garden gate to keep him in. We were flabbergasted when again, he jumped over the fence almost from a standstill point. So graceful, he's almost flying in slow motion. 

 

We're in love with him and find it sad that owners stated 'he's not a pet, he's a working dog'. Not that they treat him badly at all, they love him too, but I think it's the tradition to treat sheep dogs differently. Outside by gale, storm or rain. Poor Bo might need a re-adaptation period, we spoiled him a bit. He got lots of cuddles.

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cbimages said:

My latest upload now online. As expected, more macro stuff. A little Jumping Spider on a grass blade, showing the massive eyes, then another the same species which has caught a fly for breakfast, what a feast it will have! Then a Net Casting Spider that has caught the same species of jumping spider and having a lovely meal. Lastly a Dwarf Tree Frog, they grow to 2.5cm.

garden-jumping-spider-opisthoncus-parced

garden-jumping-spider-opisthoncus-parced

female-net-casting-spider-deinopis-subru

eastern-dwarf-tree-frog-litoria-fallax-a

Carol, again you’ve topped yourself. I call the spider The Santa Claus spider. It has the beard, just needs a ball on its hat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cbimages said:

My latest upload now online. As expected, more macro stuff. A little Jumping Spider on a grass blade, showing the massive eyes, then another the same species which has caught a fly for breakfast, what a feast it will have! Then a Net Casting Spider that has caught the same species of jumping spider and having a lovely meal. Lastly a Dwarf Tree Frog, they grow to 2.5cm.

garden-jumping-spider-opisthoncus-parced

garden-jumping-spider-opisthoncus-parced

female-net-casting-spider-deinopis-subru

eastern-dwarf-tree-frog-litoria-fallax-a

 

Lovely shots of an Opisthoncus. That's the type that likes to jump onto the lens. I like their patterns. It's hard to realise how small they are. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cbimages said:

No, I just use a 100 macro on a full frame camera. Although I do have a 12 & a 25 extension tube to add, they really don't make a huge difference on a full frame camera. Very small things, less than 5mm or so, are almost impossible to get a decent shot of with my setup. If things were different in my life, I might consider getting one of the better Canon crop sensor cameras. I suppose because I'm used to shooting small macro underwater, where, I'm big, bulky and bubble belching, so have learned patience. One thing I always do, it stop and watch a subject, see what it's doing etc. Sometimes I stand for quite a while and slowly approach, but it certainly often doesn't work! Flying insects can be difficult, but some patience and good timing helps. I like to look for dragonflies/damselflies quite early, when they have just woken up and are out and about drying their wings, as an example.


 

 

I shoot with a 105mm macro lens with a crop sensor camera. Quite often, I'm able to use the tripod for insects in bushes. They are that accommodating, well most of the time. Or I look for subjects at low level, sit on a foldable stool and rest my elbows onto my knees for stability. Talking about having weak arms!! The weight of the camera, its battery, the commander, the two flashes is not negligible when, at this magnification, the slightest move throws the shot out of focus and ruins it.

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, cbimages said:

 I like to look for dragonflies/damselflies quite early, when they have just woken up and are out and about drying their wings, as an example.
 

 

I used to have a cottage in France with a couple of meadows in a valley by a river. I would get up early in the morning and photograph insects covered in dew. Then the sun would hit the meadow and everything and everybody dried out.

 

C49FW5.jpg

 

C3FCXG.jpg

 

  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, gvallee said:

 

I've heard of the series but haven't seen it. Yesterday I was watching Backroads. They were showing sheep. Bo jumped up and stared intently at the screen. He's such a lovely dog. Very bright and eager to please. He understands lots of commands. We were told that he cannot be tired out, so we follow orders and drive to the farm gate, 1 km away one way, and back twice a day. Bo runs alongside. We've clocked him at 40kph, ears flattened, body shaped like a cheetah. Then he stops, looks back at the car wondering why we're so slow to catch up. 

 

The owners have left us the use of a 4x4 ute, the tray is quite high up. The sides of the tray can be taken down. No fear. Bo jumps into it in one bounce. With his stick in his mouth.

 

The first day, we were wondering if we should close the garden gate to keep him in. We were flabbergasted when again, he jumped over the fence almost from a standstill point. So graceful, he's almost flying in slow motion. 

 

We're in love with him and find it sad that owners stated 'he's not a pet, he's a working dog'. Not that they treat him badly at all, they love him too, but I think it's the tradition to treat sheep dogs differently. Outside by gale, storm or rain. Poor Bo might need a re-adaptation period, we spoiled him a bit. He got lots of cuddles.

Gen, looking at the Muster dogs series, I can see why, they are amazing dogs. when I was a child I had a dog which was a first cross of border collie and kelpie. It never stopped, we had a massive yard, it just ran! A few months after we got her, the neighbours, a retired couple, asked could they put a gate in the communal fence and bring her in when we were away at work/school. So she got 2 big yards and company nearly 24/7. 

Bo sounds gorgeous, I bet you would like to take him with you when you leave!

I love your dew covered insects!

Edited by cbimages
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, cbimages said:

Gen, looking at the Muster dogs series, I can see why, they are amazing dogs. when I was a child I had a dog which was a first cross of border collie and kelpie. It never stopped, we had a massive yard, it just ran! A few months after we got her, the neighbours, a retired couple, asked could they put a gate in the communal fence and bring her in when we were away at work/school. So she got 2 big yards and company nearly 24/7. 

Bo sounds gorgeous, I get you would like to take him with you when you leave!

I love your dew covered insects!

 

The sad thing with sheep dogs is when people in towns have them as pets. They get either no or not enough exercise and become unmanageable.

We arrived at the farm the day before the owners left to be given instructions. We watched in amazement how Bo played alone with his stick, killing it, barking at it, legs up in the air. He was displaying a neurotic behaviour which got us worried. We thought he was going to be a handful. And what about all those paddocks around where we could lose him! He doesn't do this with us because we keep him amused. The tragic thing is that the farmer had an accident which left him paraplegic two years ago. He sold most of the sheep. So sadly, although Bo has all the space in the world to run around, he has no job. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.