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Here's Alamy's info

 

https://www.alamy.com/contributor/how-to-sell-news-images/best-place-to-sell-live-news-images/?section=1

 

 

Of course you have to apply to Alamy to be accepted in to Live News first

 

Correction I see you are already submitting to live news

 

Edited by David Pimborough
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1 hour ago, David Pimborough said:

Of course you have to apply to Alamy to be accepted in to Live News first

Good luck.

Most of us were thrown out of Live News without notice a couple of years ago.

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I can't advise on Live News but check the caption and keywords on image 2CBYF1H - you probably still had it selected by mistake when captioning other images.

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3 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

Karlis,

your question is unclear.  Do you mean how to submit photos or do you mean what pictures to take?
 

As noted, if you have permission to submit to live news you can either use the ftp route or the web uploaded.  I use the web uploaded as I feel I have more control.  You should submit quickly.  Alamy expects live news photos within one hour of taking them.  You need a slick workflow.  Some people file from their phone.  I use photo mechanic to title, caption, keyword and cull photos.  (I wish I knew about photo mechanic when I started.) Then Lightroom for some simple edits then file.  Personally I take lots of photos and then pick the best.  Get photos early and fast, the earlier you submit, in general terms, the higher chance of usage.  You should develop your own fast workflow that suits you and your technical ability and your equipment. 
 

You should know media law backwards, when and where you can take photos and who can and cannot stop you.  The Editors Code is the minimum standard but you should develop your own ethical sense and compass.  Likewise understand what is “allowable” editing for news -which is not much.
 

If you mean what pictures to take (and I think that is your question) that is the million dollar question.  First, spend a lot of time going through newspapers (print and websites) and magazines and look at the pictures.  Ask yourself why did they use that picture?  I am not a brilliant (some might say awful) photographer, but I have an idea of what sells.  IMHO don’t take “nice” pictures, take pictures that someone anyone wants to buy.  When you are thinking of taking a picture ask yourself why anyone would want to buy that picture, what does it illustrate?  
 

keith Morris, was one of Alamy’s most successful photographers had a formula - a person doing something.  I notice that you have pictures of a fire, but no one in the picture.  You stand a better chance by including, for example, a fire fighter or even a spectator.  
 

Go through the discussion of Alamy pictures found to see what has actually sold and perhaps ask why...
 

When you go through the news media look for trends and forthcoming events.  In the UK local election are soon so I concentrate on election activities. (Difficult in the current situation). Last week was St George’s day in England so I photographed a St George flag raising, etc.   You need to try to be on trend and, if possible ahead of the news cycle.  The news cycle is fast and demanding.  Wear comfy shoes is good advice.  On a “good” day in London I will file six submissions and walk several miles....  Think about local stories and if you can put a national hook.  Elections are a good example.  I have had several Brentwood local election pictures used by the nationals in the past.   
 

Nothing beats experience.  Look at what the leading Alamy news photographers do and what they submit.  Don’t be afraid to copy until you have developed your own news style and eye.  Perseverance is necessary.  It takes time to build experience.  Often you will be in the right place at the wrong time.  I miss at least 50% of the stories I want  as I am not in the right place.  Any pro news photographer will tell you that luck does play a large part in being successful, but the more often you are out taking photos the luckier you will get.  A personal observation, always look behind you, I have missed good shots simply because I am looking in the “wrong” direction. 
 

It is worth remembering that a newspaper picture desk will get thousands if not tens of thousands of pictures each and every day.  I am always slightly amazed when my pictures get used...  Ask yourself why the pictures you are taking are going to stand out from those thousands.  
 

I have a really bad habit,  I rush at my news photos, because I want to get the shot before it disappears.  I then look at my photos and think, if only I had been a foot to the left or I did not notice the waste bin in the background.  The really good news photographers can, in an instant, consider the back and foreground, the lighting and the framing all in an instant before pressing the shutter.  I don’t think I will ever achieve this!
 

Titles, captions and keywords are most important.  If you don’t title caption and keyword well no one will find your photos.  Who, what, when where and why should be in your caption.  Don’t spam keywords.  
 

I am a fairly average news photographer and there are many who are better and more successful than me.  So, the above are just my thoughts, many will be able to give you better advice.

 

Good hunting.,..

 

A proper answer!

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3 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

Karlis,

your question is unclear.  Do you mean how to submit photos or do you mean what pictures to take?
 

As noted, if you have permission to submit to live news you can either use the ftp route or the web uploaded.  I use the web uploaded as I feel I have more control.  You should submit quickly.  Alamy expects live news photos within one hour of taking them.  You need a slick workflow.  Some people file from their phone.  I use photo mechanic to title, caption, keyword and cull photos.  (I wish I knew about photo mechanic when I started.) Then Lightroom for some simple edits then file.  Personally I take lots of photos and then pick the best.  Get photos early and fast, the earlier you submit, in general terms, the higher chance of usage.  You should develop your own fast workflow that suits you and your technical ability and your equipment. 
 

You should know media law backwards, when and where you can take photos and who can and cannot stop you.  The Editors Code is the minimum standard but you should develop your own ethical sense and compass.  Likewise understand what is “allowable” editing for news -which is not much.
 

If you mean what pictures to take (and I think that is your question) that is the million dollar question.  First, spend a lot of time going through newspapers (print and websites) and magazines and look at the pictures.  Ask yourself why did they use that picture?  I am not a brilliant (some might say awful) photographer, but I have an idea of what sells.  IMHO don’t take “nice” pictures, take pictures that someone anyone wants to buy.  When you are thinking of taking a picture ask yourself why anyone would want to buy that picture, what does it illustrate?  
 

keith Morris, was one of Alamy’s most successful photographers had a formula - a person doing something.  I notice that you have pictures of a fire, but no one in the picture.  You stand a better chance by including, for example, a fire fighter or even a spectator.  
 

Go through the discussion of Alamy pictures found to see what has actually sold and perhaps ask why...
 

When you go through the news media look for trends and forthcoming events.  In the UK local election are soon so I concentrate on election activities. (Difficult in the current situation). Last week was St George’s day in England so I photographed a St George flag raising, etc.   You need to try to be on trend and, if possible ahead of the news cycle.  The news cycle is fast and demanding.  Wear comfy shoes is good advice.  On a “good” day in London I will file six submissions and walk several miles....  Think about local stories and if you can put a national hook.  Elections are a good example.  I have had several Brentwood local election pictures used by the nationals in the past.   
 

Nothing beats experience.  Look at what the leading Alamy news photographers do and what they submit.  Don’t be afraid to copy until you have developed your own news style and eye.  Perseverance is necessary.  It takes time to build experience.  Often you will be in the right place at the wrong time.  I miss at least 50% of the stories I want  as I am not in the right place.  Any pro news photographer will tell you that luck does play a large part in being successful, but the more often you are out taking photos the luckier you will get.  A personal observation, always look behind you, I have missed good shots simply because I am looking in the “wrong” direction. 
 

It is worth remembering that a newspaper picture desk will get thousands if not tens of thousands of pictures each and every day.  I am always slightly amazed when my pictures get used...  Ask yourself why the pictures you are taking are going to stand out from those thousands.  
 

I have a really bad habit,  I rush at my news photos, because I want to get the shot before it disappears.  I then look at my photos and think, if only I had been a foot to the left or I did not notice the waste bin in the background.  The really good news photographers can, in an instant, consider the back and foreground, the lighting and the framing all in an instant before pressing the shutter.  I don’t think I will ever achieve this!
 

Titles, captions and keywords are most important.  If you don’t title caption and keyword well no one will find your photos.  Who, what, when where and why should be in your caption.  Don’t spam keywords.  
 

I am a fairly average news photographer and there are many who are better and more successful than me.  So, the above are just my thoughts, many will be able to give you better advice.

 

Good hunting.,..

 

You should write a blog post for Alamy on news photography! 

See other thread 

 

Phil

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12 hours ago, Phil Crean said:

You should write a blog post for Alamy on news photography! 

See other thread 

 

Phil

 

 

If Alamy blogs were like this I'd definitely read them

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16 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

Karlis,

your question is unclear.  Do you mean how to submit photos or do you mean what pictures to take?
 

As noted, if you have permission to submit to live news you can either use the ftp route or the web uploaded.  I use the web uploaded as I feel I have more control.  You should submit quickly.  Alamy expects live news photos within one hour of taking them.  You need a slick workflow.  Some people file from their phone.  I use photo mechanic to title, caption, keyword and cull photos.  (I wish I knew about photo mechanic when I started.) Then Lightroom for some simple edits then file.  Personally I take lots of photos and then pick the best.  Get photos early and fast, the earlier you submit, in general terms, the higher chance of usage.  You should develop your own fast workflow that suits you and your technical ability and your equipment. 
 

You should know media law backwards, when and where you can take photos and who can and cannot stop you.  The Editors Code is the minimum standard but you should develop your own ethical sense and compass.  Likewise understand what is “allowable” editing for news -which is not much.
 

If you mean what pictures to take (and I think that is your question) that is the million dollar question.  First, spend a lot of time going through newspapers (print and websites) and magazines and look at the pictures.  Ask yourself why did they use that picture?  I am not a brilliant (some might say awful) photographer, but I have an idea of what sells.  IMHO don’t take “nice” pictures, take pictures that someone anyone wants to buy.  When you are thinking of taking a picture ask yourself why anyone would want to buy that picture, what does it illustrate?  What story are you telling?  A good news photographer is a visual story teller. 
 

keith Morris, was one of Alamy’s most successful photographers had a formula - a person doing something.  I notice that you have pictures of a fire, but no one in the picture.  You stand a better chance by including, for example, a fire fighter or even a spectator.  
 

Go through the discussion of Alamy pictures found to see what has actually sold and perhaps ask why...
 

When you go through the news media look for trends and forthcoming events.  In the UK local election are soon so I concentrate on election activities. (Difficult in the current situation). Last week was St George’s day in England so I photographed a St George flag raising, etc.   You need to try to be on trend and, if possible ahead of the news cycle.  The news cycle is fast and demanding.  Wear comfy shoes is good advice.  On a “good” day in London I will file six submissions and walk several miles....  Think about local stories and if you can put a national hook.  Elections are a good example.  I have had several Brentwood local election pictures used by the nationals in the past.   
 

Nothing beats experience.  Look at what the leading Alamy news photographers do and what they submit.  Don’t be afraid to copy until you have developed your own news style and eye.  Perseverance is necessary.  It takes time to build experience.  Often you will be in the right place at the wrong time.  I miss at least 50% of the stories I want  as I am not in the right place.  Any pro news photographer will tell you that luck does play a large part in being successful, but the more often you are out taking photos the luckier you will get.  A personal observation, always look behind you, I have missed good shots simply because I am looking in the “wrong” direction. 

 

Learn the rules about lighting and photo composition;  breaking the rules is fine but you have to know what rules to break and when.
 

It is worth remembering that a newspaper picture desk will get thousands if not tens of thousands of pictures each and every day.  I am always slightly amazed when my pictures get used...  Ask yourself why the pictures you are taking are going to stand out from those thousands.  
 

I have a really bad habit,  I rush at my news photos, because I want to get the shot before it disappears.  I then look at my photos and think, if only I had been a foot to the left or I did not notice the waste bin in the background.  The really good news photographers can, in an instant, consider the back and foreground, the lighting and the framing all in an instant before pressing the shutter.  I don’t think I will ever achieve this!
 

Titles, captions and keywords are most important.  If you don’t title caption and keyword well no one will find your photos.  Who, what, when where and why should be in your caption.  Don’t spam keywords.  
 

I am a fairly average news photographer and there are many who are better and more successful than me.  So, the above are just my thoughts, many will be able to give you better advice.

 

Good hunting.,..

 

Ian,

 

While I agree with a lot of what you have written, I do disagree with you on "speed."  I do believe that it is important to get the best image up and out as quickly as possible, BUT in my opinion a photographer can make mistakes when trying to move to fast and the details of the event are not 100% available.  As a dear friend of mine use to say; "Speed, Quality or Cost, choose any two of the three."  In terms of "Live News" I would say go as fast as you can with the best image you have.

 

It is also important to remember the events, Live News, can change and if you upload to quickly you might not have accurate information to caption and keyword images.

 

Just my opinion....

 

Chucke

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2 hours ago, Chuck Nacke said:

Ian,

 

While I agree with a lot of what you have written, I do disagree with you on "speed."  I do believe that it is important to get the best image up and out as quickly as possible, BUT in my opinion a photographer can make mistakes when trying to move to fast and the details of the event are not 100% available.  As a dear friend of mine use to say; "Speed, Quality or Cost, choose any two of the three."  In terms of "Live News" I would say go as fast as you can with the best image you have.

 

It is also important to remember the events, Live News, can change and if you upload to quickly you might not have accurate information to caption and keyword images.

 

Just my opinion....

 

Chucke

Chuck

You are of course, absolutely right.  It is always a balance.  I have been caught, more than once, filing in Downing Street when someone arrives and I miss the shot.  I am always careful with captions to be both as accurate and as contextual as possible.  It is about experience and what decision to make at what time.  In my world I am in competition, (and one I can’t really win) against PA, Reuter’s, EPA etc who file direct from camera to the picture desk.  I value your opinion we both know really the only way is to go out and do and learn on the job.

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5 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

Chuck

You are of course, absolutely right.  It is always a balance.  I have been caught, more than once, filing in Downing Street when someone arrives and I miss the shot.  I am always careful with captions to be both as accurate and as contextual as possible.  It is about experience and what decision to make at what time.  In my world I am in competition, (and one I can’t really win) against PA, Reuter’s, EPA etc who file direct from camera to the picture desk.  I value your opinion we both know really the only way is to go out and do and learn on the job.

Thank you Ian,

 

I completely agree with you.  Keep in mind that I see trying to "Compete" with the wires as a lost cause.  Back in the day when I was a News Agency Photographer it was about doing more than the wires (AP, UPI, Reuter's, EPA, etc.)  They shot color neg and moved quickly, latter low rez digital, we (I) shot chromes, later 36MP digital and often travel with over 4,000 watts of strobes.  The "Wires" were also usually gone when the best images of an event happened.  Access was also part of the equation.

 

I will add that while I have not been impressed with the licenses that Alamy has made from my Live News submissions, they have been licensed many times months and years later.

 

I also think that digital has changed the equation, it has made wire photos and screen grabs from video part of the equation.  The news magazine market is also at an all time low.

 

I think we do agree and I am thankful that I am not starting out as a photographer in the new millennium.

 

Karlis, is any of this answering the question that you originally asked?

 

Chuck

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Great news. Just been out to do a local live news political event after being lockdown for months and months and months and after weeks and weeks and weeks of dry sunny weather it rains and rains and rains today. So Karlis be prepared.

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6 hours ago, Alan Beastall said:

Great news. Just been out to do a local live news political event after being lockdown for months and months and months and after weeks and weeks and weeks of dry sunny weather it rains and rains and rains today. So Karlis be prepared.

Karlis lives in West Cork, both he and I are well used to rain 🤣

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3 hours ago, Colblimp said:

Karlis lives in West Cork, both he and I are well used to rain 🤣

West Cork, like all of Ireland a great place to visit. No matter the weather be prepared and keep producing brill. images.

Alan

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7 hours ago, Alan Beastall said:

West Cork, like all of Ireland a great place to visit. No matter the weather be prepared and keep producing brill. images.

Alan

I'm well prepared for rain, but producing brill. images?  Not me, sir...

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I think it is pretty rude of Karlis to not say "thank you".... particularly to Ian. He spent a lot of his valuable time answering in detail. I never understand the people who ask a question and then disappear.

 

Paulette

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On 25/04/2021 at 13:23, IanDavidson said:

Karlis,

your question is unclear.  Do you mean how to submit photos or do you mean what pictures to take?
 

As noted, if you have permission to submit to live news you can either use the ftp route or the web uploaded.  I use the web uploaded as I feel I have more control.  You should submit quickly.  Alamy expects live news photos within one hour of taking them.  You need a slick workflow.  Some people file from their phone.  I use photo mechanic to title, caption, keyword and cull photos.  (I wish I knew about photo mechanic when I started.) Then Lightroom for some simple edits then file.  Personally I take lots of photos and then pick the best.  Get photos early and fast, the earlier you submit, in general terms, the higher chance of usage.  You should develop your own fast workflow that suits you and your technical ability and your equipment. 
 

You should know media law backwards, when and where you can take photos and who can and cannot stop you.  The Editors Code is the minimum standard but you should develop your own ethical sense and compass.  Likewise understand what is “allowable” editing for news -which is not much.
 

If you mean what pictures to take (and I think that is your question) that is the million dollar question.  First, spend a lot of time going through newspapers (print and websites) and magazines and look at the pictures.  Ask yourself why did they use that picture?  I am not a brilliant (some might say awful) photographer, but I have an idea of what sells.  IMHO don’t take “nice” pictures, take pictures that someone anyone wants to buy.  When you are thinking of taking a picture ask yourself why anyone would want to buy that picture, what does it illustrate?  What story are you telling?  A good news photographer is a visual story teller. 
 

keith Morris, was one of Alamy’s most successful photographers had a formula - a person doing something.  I notice that you have pictures of a fire, but no one in the picture.  You stand a better chance by including, for example, a fire fighter or even a spectator.  
 

Go through the discussion of Alamy pictures found to see what has actually sold and perhaps ask why...
 

When you go through the news media look for trends and forthcoming events.  In the UK local election are soon so I concentrate on election activities. (Difficult in the current situation). Last week was St George’s day in England so I photographed a St George flag raising, etc.   You need to try to be on trend and, if possible ahead of the news cycle.  The news cycle is fast and demanding.  Wear comfy shoes is good advice.  On a “good” day in London I will file six submissions and walk several miles....  Think about local stories and if you can put a national hook.  Elections are a good example.  I have had several Brentwood local election pictures used by the nationals in the past.   
 

Nothing beats experience.  Look at what the leading Alamy news photographers do and what they submit.  Don’t be afraid to copy until you have developed your own news style and eye.  Perseverance is necessary.  It takes time to build experience.  Often you will be in the right place at the wrong time.  I miss at least 50% of the stories I want  as I am not in the right place.  Any pro news photographer will tell you that luck does play a large part in being successful, but the more often you are out taking photos the luckier you will get.  A personal observation, always look behind you, I have missed good shots simply because I am looking in the “wrong” direction. 

 

Learn the rules about lighting and photo composition;  breaking the rules is fine but you have to know what rules to break and when.
 

It is worth remembering that a newspaper picture desk will get thousands if not tens of thousands of pictures each and every day.  I am always slightly amazed when my pictures get used...  Ask yourself why the pictures you are taking are going to stand out from those thousands.  
 

I have a really bad habit,  I rush at my news photos, because I want to get the shot before it disappears.  I then look at my photos and think, if only I had been a foot to the left or I did not notice the waste bin in the background.  The really good news photographers can, in an instant, consider the back and foreground, the lighting and the framing all in an instant before pressing the shutter.  I don’t think I will ever achieve this!
 

Titles, captions and keywords are most important.  If you don’t title caption and keyword well no one will find your photos.  Who, what, when where and why should be in your caption.  Don’t spam keywords.  
 

I am a fairly average news photographer and there are many who are better and more successful than me.  So, the above are just my thoughts, many will be able to give you better advice.

 

Good hunting.,..

 

Hello Ian, soory for my unclear question. I must say a big thank you for this well descripted answer. Also I must say that you have some amazing photos! 

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