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I submitted three images of the Hard Rock Cafe in Times Square today. They show a large video display with constantly changing pictures. The video screen showed moiré on it in my images. I liked the way it looked set against the normal buildings . . . but now, too late, I'm fearful QC won't share my "creative" point of view. What do think? Should I have been more conservative? Moiré is not mentioned on the Alamy no-no list. 

 

:unsure:

Edited by Ed Rooney

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If I was a betting man I'd put a penny on it passing.

 

 

 

I'm sure it will pass.

Edited by JohnB

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I submitted three images of the Hard Rock Cafe in Time Square today. They show a large video display with constantly changing pictures. The video screen showed moiré on it in my images. I liked the way it looked set against the normal buildings . . . but now, too late, I'm fearful QC won't share my "creative" point of view. What do think? Should I have been more conservative? Moiré is not mentioned on the Alamy no-no list. 

 

:unsure:

 

As long as it's not too distracting, I'd say leave it in.  If it's really distracting, leave it in and caption/keyword it as an example of moiré in images!

 

If I was a betting man I'd put a penny on it passing.

 

Wish I had that kind of cash! :)

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As long as it's not too distracting, I'd say leave it in.  If it's really distracting, leave it in and caption/keyword it as an example of moiré in images!

 

Alamy say that no-one reads captions during QC, so putting 'moiré', or 'deliberate blur', etc, is unlikely to help...

Edited by John Morrison

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As long as it's not too distracting, I'd say leave it in.  If it's really distracting, leave it in and caption/keyword it as an example of moiré in images!

 

Alamy say that no-one reads captions during QC, so putting 'moiré', or 'deliberate blur', etc, is unlikely to help...

 

 

No, I understand that - perhaps I wasn't too clear - I meant for a prospective customer searching for an example of moiré, rather than as an explanation of reasoning to QC.

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The extent of the patterning depends on the size of their monitors so they may not even see moiré. It's not a technical fault in any case, it's a characteristic of the image,  so I don't see why it shouldn't pass if it's up to scratch otherwise

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Interesting thought, Mark. There's a building down on the Bowery here in Lower Manhattan, the New Museum. The facade itself has a strong pattern of lines. I've captured it twice but have not uploaded any of those images because they had pronounced moiré all over the building. I would not want to have those pictures in my collection. With the new images I did of the Hard Rock Cafe, the moiré is only on the large video screen, and I think the contrast between that and the surrounding scene is interesting and attractive. We shall see.   :) 

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Ed, I'm not that familiar with moiré, but an Alamy search for "moiré" brings up a lot of images. So you might be in good company.

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Erm, what might the workflow be for removing it, pray tell? I use CS3. 

 

Rgds,

Richard. 

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google?

 

the Help function of Photoshop?

 

There are so many ways of dealing with moire in photoshop, that the help function alone comes up with 458 items. Just pick one that you understand and uses tools you are comfortable with.

All the top Google results work, only for you the ones that use newer versions of Adobe Raw won't, because you have CS3 and the current is CS6. Working in RAW is usually just a lot quicker (some will argue it's better too).

The first result is about scans, and will have a rather crude result, but it will work, even just in Elements.

 

wim

 

edit: it's one of the first things, if not the first, to do.

In ACR it looks like this:

 

ACR-Technique.jpg

Edited by wiskerke
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google?

 

the Help function of Photoshop?

 

There are so many ways of dealing with moire in photoshop, that the help function alone comes up with 458 items. Just pick one that you understand and uses tools you are comfortable with.

All the top Google results work, only for you the ones that use newer versions of Adobe Raw won't, because you have CS3 and the current is CS6. Working in RAW is usually just a lot quicker (some will argue it's better too).

The first result is about scans, and will have a rather crude result, but it will work, even just in Elements.

 

wim

 

edit: it's one of the first things, if not the first, to do.

In ACR it looks like this:

 

Notice you are using a D800E in that screenshot. Just wondering if you find moiré a problem with the D800E?

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google?

 

the Help function of Photoshop?

 

There are so many ways of dealing with moire in photoshop, that the help function alone comes up with 458 items. Just pick one that you understand and uses tools you are comfortable with.

All the top Google results work, only for you the ones that use newer versions of Adobe Raw won't, because you have CS3 and the current is CS6. Working in RAW is usually just a lot quicker (some will argue it's better too).

The first result is about scans, and will have a rather crude result, but it will work, even just in Elements.

 

wim

 

edit: it's one of the first things, if not the first, to do.

In ACR it looks like this:

 

Notice you are using a D800E in that screenshot. Just wondering if you find moiré a problem with the D800E?

 

This is a screenshot from one of the Google links not my own.

I have used the 800E a couple of times now and have seen no real difference in moire patterns between my own 1DS3 and the Nikon. But that's in cityscapes and architecture.

If you do weddings or fashion, I would not use the 800E though.

So yes there is moire in buildings, but like with the Canons and the Sonys it's totally manageable in ACR.

 

wim

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Thanks so much for that very helpful post, Wim. 

 

A year or two ago I did use CS5 or LR to get rid of some moiré on an image, but I forgot exactly how I did it. :rolleyes: Anyway, my situation here is that I wanted to keep the moiré but was worried about the images passing QC. They did pass QC this morning . . . and I must say, in my own history, that QC always gets it when you are going for a creative effect. It's possible, of course, that they didn't look at those particular images, but I think they did; there are three of them, after all.

 

I'll put one or two of them up here when they go live tomorrow. Thanks again, all.    

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Ed - I would be very surprised if it did not pass - the moire is part of the image and obviously wont affect the surrounding buildings therefore. QC are good at this sort of thing

 

Let us know how it goes!

 

Kumar sriskandan

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google?

 

the Help function of Photoshop?

 

There are so many ways of dealing with moire in photoshop, that the help function alone comes up with 458 items. Just pick one that you understand and uses tools you are comfortable with.

All the top Google results work, only for you the ones that use newer versions of Adobe Raw won't, because you have CS3 and the current is CS6. Working in RAW is usually just a lot quicker (some will argue it's better too).

The first result is about scans, and will have a rather crude result, but it will work, even just in Elements.

 

wim

 

edit: it's one of the first things, if not the first, to do.

In ACR it looks like this:

 

Notice you are using a D800E in that screenshot. Just wondering if you find moiré a problem with the D800E?

 

This is a screenshot from one of the Google links not my own.

I have used the 800E a couple of times now and have seen no real difference in moire patterns between my own 1DS3 and the Nikon. But that's in cityscapes and architecture.

If you do weddings or fashion, I would not use the 800E though.

So yes there is moire in buildings, but like with the Canons and the Sonys it's totally manageable in ACR.

 

wim

Thanks for the reply Wim. I was just wondering when I saw the screenshot as there was quite an issue made out of potential moiré when the D800E was released. I have not noticed any moiré on anything I've done with it (mainly rural landscapes, with or without sea, and some cityscapes).

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MDM, Europe's cityscapes are likely to produce less moire effects than Times Square, with its huge assortment of video screens and neon. Next time I go up there, I'll be going at night.  :)

 

I'm very much an American and a born-here New Yorker (Brooklyn), but I lived in Europe for 16 years. Times Square and Las Vegas and "the glittering lights" are not at all my scene. But, hey—it's important as a stock subject.  :rolleyes:

Edited by Ed Rooney

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Hi All, 

 

Is the red above the clock face on "Big Ben" Moire ? I take moire from the last link above to be a wavy series of coloured lines. I have another picture with blue on the houses of parliament windows . I assume some kind of "clipping"  

 

Regards, 

 

Adrian. 

 

CW3498.jpg

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Hi All, 

 

Is the red above the clock face on "Big Ben" Moire ? I take moire from the last link above to be a wavy series of coloured lines. I have another picture with blue on the houses of parliament windows . I assume some kind of "clipping"  

 

Regards, 

 

Adrian. 

 

Looks more like over-saturation to me. Just use the slider, but to the other side ;-)

 

The sort of moire we are discussing here is were a pattern's frequency coincides with the pixel frequency of the sensor. If there is moire in your picture, it would probably be in bricks of a building or some railing or fences. Most other stuff is just not regular and fine enough.

 

I can think of a trick if you really want to avoid moire at all cost but want to keep post to a minimum: expose an extra frame with the smallest aperture available on the lens. The diffraction will probably smear all detail more than the anti-aliasing filter in front of the sensor ever could. In post use the diffraction blurred image as a layer over the original sharp image and paint in the blurred one if there's any moire.

This is purely theoretical, I have never tried this, I just made it up. (But it will probably work.)

 

wim

Edited by wiskerke

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Thanks Wim. Tried the contrast slider but it did not work. Guess its a red light above clock. Will have to look next time I'm near Parliament at night. 

 

Your removal method looks interesting as a layer method. 

 

Regards, 

 

Adrian. 

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Thanks Wim. Tried the contrast slider but it did not work. Guess its a red light above clock. Will have to look next time I'm near Parliament at night. 

 

Yes it probably is.

Still if you want to tone it down, but want the rest of the image to remain as it is, you can use the sliders in the HSL/Grayscale menu in ACR.

It's the 3rd small button to the right of Basic.

Try moving the red and orange sliders in all three tabs: Hue, Luminance and Saturation (HSL). In Luminance and Saturation to the left.

You don't want to introduce gray: a risk when moving the highlights slider too far to the left in the basic menu. Ok for most things, just not for lights.

 

wim

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MDM, Europe's cityscapes are likely to produce less moire effects than Times Square, with its huge assortment of video screens and neon. Next time I go up there, I'll be going at night.  :)

 

I'm very much an American and a born-here New Yorker (Brooklyn), but I lived in Europe for 16 years. Times Square and Las Vegas and "the glittering lights" are not at all my scene. But, hey—it's important as a stock subject.  

Interesting link Ed thanks. I'll stash it for future reference.

 

I've only been to New York once - I was there the day John Lennon was shot which dates it pretty well as Dec 1980. But New York is very familiar from all the movies and crime shows I've watched over the years.

 

I tend to prefer being on a mountain alone than in the middle of a city but I love the big urban life as well. I'm certainly more comfortable taking pictures in solitude breathing in pure Atlantic air in the west of Ireland or the Canaries. And there is less moiré (or maybe it's just my eyesight) :)

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"google?

the Help function of Photoshop?"

 

 

Should I need to research a problem independently of this help forum, I'm well versed thanks. 

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MDM, Europe's cityscapes are likely to produce less moire effects than Times Square, with its huge assortment of video screens and neon. Next time I go up there, I'll be going at night.  :)

 

I'm very much an American and a born-here New Yorker (Brooklyn), but I lived in Europe for 16 years. Times Square and Las Vegas and "the glittering lights" are not at all my scene. But, hey—it's important as a stock subject.  

Interesting link Ed thanks. I'll stash it for future reference.

 

I've only been to New York once - I was there the day John Lennon was shot which dates it pretty well as Dec 1980. But New York is very familiar from all the movies and crime shows I've watched over the years.

 

I tend to prefer being on a mountain alone than in the middle of a city but I love the big urban life as well. I'm certainly more comfortable taking pictures in solitude breathing in pure Atlantic air in the west of Ireland or the Canaries. And there is less moiré (or maybe it's just my eyesight) :)

 

I hear you, MDM. There are many days I would like to find myself on a mountain top far far away from this noisy, busy city. But here I am. Kesté is a Neopalitan slang word that means "this is it."  My grandparents are from Sligo, were the air could not be fresher. 

 

So here is one of my Times Square images with moiré. I guess it's large enough to see the moiré. Sorry, but I was unable to imbed the image, although I've done that before.  D72W40

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I've spent a week in the Sligo area a few weeks back. It's a part of Ireland I didn't know too well before but it was great for landscape photography and walking. I got five sunny days out of seven with only one day of rain which is very good going in the west of Ireland. I've not uploaded anything to Alamy but will be doing so shortly I hope.

 

Thought I would see if I could liink your image Ed. Maybe you were getting the url of the page which contains the sale information rather than the image itself. Easy to forget.  To get the url of the image itself, right click on the image and copy the image location, then past the link in here using the image button. Yes the moiré is clearly visible at this size.

 

 

Ed Rooney's picture:

 

D72W40.jpg

Edited by MDM

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