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RWatkins

Adding vingnette to images. Yes or No?

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A good friend of mine makes his living as a photographer for The Times and has more recently started doing weddings in a journalistic style.

 

I've noticed a lot of his photos have a deliberately added vignette (either that or his lenses have a severe fall-off). This is something I've seen in some images on Alamy too.

 

Some are subtle:

AFMP0D.jpgA0R5KN.jpg

 

Some not so sublte:

AF67Y2.jpg  BDG3CE.jpg

 

I've always left my images for stock with little processing to allow the buyer to do what they want but I'm wondering if this is something I should be thinking about for new images that I feel may benefit from it.

What do others do?

Edited by RWatkins

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Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't.

I really like vignetting so I have to rein myself in otherwise I overdo it.

Edited by Russell Watkins

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The danger is when the intended vignette looks like lens fall-off - it does to me in one of these examples especially.  I'd only add a vignette if it was part of a clear, stylistic choice that the image would benefit from. 

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I often add a slight vignette so that the viewer is directed more towards the subject. My preference is to only do it very slightly so that it can barely be seen. IMO at the end of the day it is a matter of personal choice and personal style. No presentation can suit all. I guess I agree with you to leave it to the buyer.

 

dov

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Personally, I say the 'subtle' ones are far worse - at least the vignetting in the latter two looks deliberate. The first two give me the impression of incompetence on the photographers part. 

 

Although not to my taste, I could see how someone could argue for its inclusion in the aircraft picture. 

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It can make an image look that bit more dramatic, and its something your average punter can't do, so it adds abit of magic to otherwise unremarkable images. Easily overdone (like most manipulations!)

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I do it sometimes to portraits to add to the mood of the image.  Here's one from a recent shoot....

 

 

 

E59YGW.jpg

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When working in the darkroom I very often used to burn the corners of my prints by 5 - 10% - same principle

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Remember that the buyer can always put a vignette on the images if they want to, to take it off is more difficult. If you make a stylistic choice of using one, why not upload both images (with and without). 

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I sometime burn in or lighten the corners to create an atmosphere, or direct attention.

 

Here is burn in for an image about depression.

E0YG5A.jpg

 

Here is lighter corners, lighter than the the lens correction, for a snow scene.

DNHJMA.jpg

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Adding vinaigrette to images. :) Sorry the misspelling brought me in another direction.

 

I remove the lens fall-off instead. Will consider a rare adding of vignetting to certain images in the future.

Edited by Niels Quist

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Adding vinaigrette to images. :)

 

Could make a bland image more palatable?

 

Didn't spot the additional N in the title and it doesn't appear possible to edit a title, only the message.

 

Thank you all for your comments, I will keep the idea in the back of my mind when processing images but use it rarely I feel.

 

Next question, what is the best way to achieve a subtle result? Dodge/burn tool or feathered selection and levels or something else?

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I use the vignette sliders in lens correction in CS2, give a nice subtle and controllable effect 

 

York--Photographers.jpg

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I considered this a while ago and one thing that has made me pause is the possibility that the buyer would like to re-crop the image. So I have done some but mostly don't and try to keep it subtle these days.

 

Paulette

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Next question, what is the best way to achieve a subtle result? Dodge/burn tool or feathered selection and levels or something else?

 

 

I use the slider in Lightroom.  About 95% of my processing is done completely in Lightroom

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.. I use the slider in Lightroom.  About 95% of my processing is done completely in Lightroom

 

Me too, giving it a value of -10 or so. So yes, the subtle look.

 

Rgds,

Richard

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