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Contract Change 2021 - Official thread


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40 minutes ago, GeoffK said:

 

Never assume that all grafitti is 'illegal' - some artwork is paid for and I doubt photographers shooting such images actually find out the legal situation.

 

The problem is not always being sued, it's also the treat of it. Legal advice costs.

 

One (in)famous case that did get to court  https://petapixel.com/2010/04/10/greek-man-sues-swedish-company-over-turkish-yogurt/

 

The stock agency involved is based in Spain and was also taken to court (or at least the owner was in court according to himself, on the agency forum) - never found out how far down the food chain the legal issues went. 

 

I suspect the new words in the agreement are either based on events or are a corporate 'norm' from the new owners - either way doesn't matter too much.

I wouldn't assume all graffiti was illegal, one went up in Liverpool a few weeks ago and it was an advert and it was being filmed, so that wasn't, some areas of course are allowed, it was just a general question.

 

It doesn't say as much on the link, also you also say you don't know how far down the line it went, but for us it's what affect did it have on the Photographer and is this what Alamy are trying to pass onto us? I certainly don't know

 

But I guess as Alamy's new owners have a lot to do with the newspapers, they are wording things their way, but I still want to know for sure how it affects us as photographers, which is why I'd like someone who has a legal mind or who knows one answer the questions & what scenarios we need to be wary of, if there is one on the forum?

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34 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

Always fascinating to read these expositions about what Alamy could and should be doing. 

 

I think that we all need to move on and get a life.

 

 

Off you go then. 😉

 

Mark

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14 minutes ago, ChrisC said:

Sorry I meant as in we are taking a photo for Editorial, & maybe I've got this wrong, but I thought Alamy was being careful about how these Graffiti images are used and said Editorial was ok, but because some artists were saying they had breached the Graffiti artists copyright, it couldn't be a photo showing the graffiti as the main part of the image, but it could be part of the image in the background, so I for one have never uploaded any, just in case

 

my understanding is Alamy does not want to distribute 2 dimensional art, other than public domain, that was the total image for potential liability and reputation exposure, and wasn't specific to graffiti.  We saw a case that put them front page about a picture so i can understand the decision.  

 

 

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1 minute ago, meanderingemu said:

 

my understanding is Alamy does not want to distribute 2 dimensional art, other than public domain, that was the total image for potential liability and reputation exposure, and wasn't specific to graffiti.  We saw a case that put them front page about a picture so i can understand the decision.  

 

 

That was it! 👍

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9 minutes ago, M.Chapman said:

Off you go then. 😉

 

Mark

 

 

Mark,

 

In all honesty why do you think Alamy should listen to you?

 

What are you expecting to gain for these 'Alamy should have' posts.

 

 

Edited by geogphotos
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3 hours ago, M.Chapman said:

 

 

Finally, to improve the customer offering, introduce random QC on keywording for a period and notify contributors where there are problems. This would cost, but would help ensure customers see more of what they are searching for more quickly.

 

Mark

 

Here's a bit of random and free QC on keywords Mark to take your mind off all this contract stuff. I hope you don't mind me posting this rather than emailing but there is a heavy atmosphere in this place so a little diversion might not be a bad thing. 

 

I was looking at your images on the newest page of your port and you are describing rocks as having glacial scouring marks, tramlines etc (not an expression I am familiar with). These very regular lines are nothing to do with glaciation. They are a primary feature of the rocks - it is a layered intrusion, very similar in appearance to stratified sedimentary rocks but these are igneous rocks and these structures were formed over 60 million years ago in a madam (crazy autocorrect) magma chamber. Glacial scouring (striations or striae) are very irregular. The pics are great by the way.

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1 hour ago, Autumn Sky said:

+1  Genuinely nice person too.  I'd be happy to buy Steve a beer if I ever meet him in person

 

Aw, thanks!!

 

Basingstoke. I'm in Basingstoke 😅

Edited by Steve F
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3 hours ago, meanderingemu said:

 

having read many of your inputs, i am not sure if you are capable of that.  You have to be one of the most patient, trying to find positive angles, critique I have encountered. 

 

 

 

Thanks! I have a lot of graduates doing work for me, I'd get told off if I made them all resign from the company 😝

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25 minutes ago, MDM said:

They are a primary feature of the rocks - it is a layered intrusion, very similar in appearance to stratified sedimentary rocks but these are igneous rocks and these structures were formed over 60 million years ago in a madam chamber. Glacial scouring (striations or striae) are very irregular. The pics are great by the way.

 

I respectfully disagree - If you saw where those lines are you'd see how they line up with the trajectory of the glacier moving out of the corrie.

 

For context - there's a wider view here DE15HY

 

Mark

 

 

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3 hours ago, Sultanpepa said:

 

So do I so I'll give to the last possible moment.

 

Good idea. You have a solid, well captioned and keyworded collection that you've put a lot of time and effort into.

 

It seems to me that UK-based contributors are ironically at something of a disadvantage on Alamy when it comes to making a lot of sales (except to "the papers" of course) due to the huge local competition, and the fact that every crag and cranny of the relatively small region appears to have been covered. Also, fees appear to be quite low in the UK, which is even more of an impediment for those looking for "Gold." Please correct me if I'm wrong about this.

 

Chicken Little Syndrome can be contagious. Best to wait to see just how much of the sky will end up falling IMHO. 🐔

 

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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Mark - you can (dis)respectfully disagree but I am a former professional geologist with a PhD in igneous petrology and that is a layered intrusion. Glacial scouring would never be regular like that. The layered intrusions of the Scottish Isles are world famous. I am not going to bother arguing this with you any further. 

 

EDIT - there are glacial scouring marks but the regular structures are primary igneous structures.

Edited by MDM
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6 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

It seems to me that UK-based contributors are ironically at something of a disadvantage on Alamy when it comes to making a lot of sales

I must be an exception then. 18 years ago I started with 10 images and now I have just under 10,000. In that time I've made a total of 8858 individual sales.

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7 minutes ago, AndrewP said:

I must be an exception then. 18 years ago I started with 10 images and now I have just under 10,000. In that time I've made a total of 8858 individual sales.

 

That's good to hear. Congratulations. Another one of my crackpot theories down the drain...🥴

 

P.S. I was thinking of the more common "walk-around" the village and countryside UK editorial portfolio that you tend to see on Alamy. Yours doesn't appear to be that location-specific.

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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7 minutes ago, MDM said:

Mark - you can (dis)respectfully disagree but I am a former professional geologist with a PhD in igneous petrology and that is a layered intrusion. Glacial scouring would never be regular like that. The layered intrusions of the Scottish Isles are world famous. I am not going to bother arguing this with you any further. 

 

Damn, getting the big guns out!

 

Talking about films:

 

  • [Howard walks into the hotel gift shop, wanders around, picks up a big rock, a souvenir of Alcatraz, and taps it with a tuning fork] 

    Judy : What's up, Doc?

    Howard : I beg your pardon?

    Judy : We've gotta stop meeting like this.

    Howard : I think you're making a mistake. You see, I just came in here for something for a headache.

    Judy : You're gonna need an awful big glass of water to get that down.

    Howard : What? Oh no, no you see I'm a musicologist. I was just testing this specimen for inherent tonal qualities. I have this theory about early man's musical relationship to igneous rock formations. But I guess you're not really interested in igneous rock formations.

    Judy : Not as much as I am in the sedimentary or metamorphic rock categories. I mean, I can take your igneous rocks or leave 'em. I relate primarily to micas, quartz, feldspar. You can keep your Pyroxenes, magnetites and coarse grained plutonics as far as I'm concerned.

    Howard : I forgot why I came in here.

    Judy : Headache.

    Howard : Oh, yes. Thank you. And goodbye.

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15 minutes ago, MDM said:

Mark - you can (dis)respectfully disagree but I am a former professional geologist with a PhD in igneous petrology and that is a layered intrusion. Glacial scouring would never be regular like that. The layered intrusions of the Scottish Isles are world famous. I am not going to bother arguing this with you any further. 

 

OK, let's not argue. I've done some looking on-line and can see similar examples (mis?)described as glacial scouring and as layered intrusion. Do you know why these lines, over a huge area would all line up apparently perfectly with the flow of the glacier out of the corrie. Is it just chance, or is there some other reason, e.g. the flow direction of lava? Did you look at DE15HY (and DE15M3) for wider context?

 

Mark

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1 minute ago, Steve F said:

 

Damn, getting the big guns out!

 

Talking about films:

 

  • [Howard walks into the hotel gift shop, wanders around, picks up a big rock, a souvenir of Alcatraz, and taps it with a tuning fork] 

    Judy : What's up, Doc?

    Howard : I beg your pardon?

    Judy : We've gotta stop meeting like this.

    Howard : I think you're making a mistake. You see, I just came in here for something for a headache.

    Judy : You're gonna need an awful big glass of water to get that down.

    Howard : What? Oh no, no you see I'm a musicologist. I was just testing this specimen for inherent tonal qualities. I have this theory about early man's musical relationship to igneous rock formations. But I guess you're not really interested in igneous rock formations.

    Judy : Not as much as I am in the sedimentary or metamorphic rock categories. I mean, I can take your igneous rocks or leave 'em. I relate primarily to micas, quartz, feldspar. You can keep your Pyroxenes, magnetites and coarse grained plutonics as far as I'm concerned.

    Howard : I forgot why I came in here.

    Judy : Headache.

    Howard : Oh, yes. Thank you. And goodbye.


Hahaha. I have had numerous long academic arguments with Mark online and off about photography  so I thought I would kill this early as I do know what I am talking about here.   🤣

 

Did you get that camera repaired? 

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8 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

Yours doesn't appear to be that location-specific.

Exactly! Photograph what others aren't!

 

PS. I'll still be in the middle of the Gold Tier if all these changes go ahead.

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5 minutes ago, MDM said:


Hahaha. I have had numerous long academic arguments with Mark online and off about photography  so I thought I would kill this early as I do know what I am talking about here.   🤣

 

Did you get that camera repaired? 

 

Oh damn, I should have posted in the 'Post a good thing that happened to to today' thread! Yes, I got it back yesterday. Works fine. Except replacing some of the electronics is equivalent to a factory reset so I'm trying to remember what all my shortcut keys were set as....

 

Thanks a lot for the tip you gave me, much appreciated. They were very professional. Also never seen a camera place with so much decent professional equipment in before.

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7 minutes ago, AndrewP said:

Exactly! Photograph what others aren't!

 

I wasn't meaning to be critical BTW. I really like a lot of the UK-specific imagery on Alamy. Checking out people's portfolios has been a real education. I lived in England for awhile as a kid. If I ever go back I will now know where just about every pub in the country is thanks to Alamy. 🍺

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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4 minutes ago, MDM said:

Hahaha. I have had numerous long academic arguments with Mark online and off about photography  so I thought I would kill this early as I do know what I am talking about here.   

That's how many of our arguments finish up 🙂  MDM just knows so much stuff.

 

Mark

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2 minutes ago, M.Chapman said:

 

OK, let's not argue. I've done some looking on-line and can see similar examples (mis?)described glacial scouring and as layered intrusion. Do you know why these lines, over a huge area would all line up apparently perfectly with the flow of the glacier out of the corrie. Is it just chance, or is there some other reason? Did you look at DE15HY (and DE15M3) for wider context?

 

Mark

 

Yes but as I say you would never get such continuous and regular striae over such distances. Glacial scouring is formed by rocks of all shapes and sizes being carried along on the bottom of a glacier. The lineation towards the corrie may be something to do with preferential erosion along the pre-existing structure, probably long before glaciation began. Without reading about it in detail it is impossible to say but I am 100% certain that the regular marks are primary igneous features. 

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20 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

I started watching a Netflix movie on Elsa Dorfman's portrait photography, then went out and photographed my sheets drying on the line. 

 

... and now it looks as if you (and the rest of us) might be being hung out to dry.

 

(sorry, couldn't resist)

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1 minute ago, M.Chapman said:

That's how many of our arguments finish up 🙂  MDM just knows so much stuff.

 

Mark

Geological yes but photography I tend to just give up Mark. I did spend years studying stuff like this. In fact I was offered a PhD on Skye and one on a volcano in Chile. It was a no-brainer decision. 

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