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Hi, I wonder if anyone can answer my query.

 
I have just sent in a submission of 40 images but 5 have been rejected for being too small and not in the 3-5 mb size.
 
I have checked the images and the images are as follows;
 
AAB9502 - 2377 x 2343 - 6.15mb
 
AAB9503 - 2050 x 2377 - 5.54mb
 
DSC0025 - 2691 x 2005 - 7.59mb
 
DSC0025 - 2701 x 2183 - 6.56mb
 
DSC0033 - 2412 x 2000 - 4.82mb. 
 
Can you enlighten me as to how these images are not within the required size please.
 
What am I missing?
 
Regards
 
Colin
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On 27/09/2020 at 10:33, colin seddon said:

Hi, I wonder if anyone can answer my query.

 
I have just sent in a submission of 40 images but 5 have been rejected for being too small and not in the 3-5 mb size.
 
I have checked the images and the images are as follows;
 
AAB9502 - 2377 x 2343 - 6.15mb
 
AAB9503 - 2050 x 2377 - 5.54mb
 
DSC0025 - 2691 x 2005 - 7.59mb
 
DSC0025 - 2701 x 2183 - 6.56mb
 
DSC0033 - 2412 x 2000 - 4.82mb. 
 
Can you enlighten me as to how these images are not within the required size please.
 
What am I missing?
 
Regards
 
Colin

 

For Alamy the uncompressed image size must be 17MB or more. This equates roughly to 6,000,000 pixels. So with a 3:2 format image I suggest you ensure you have 3,000 x 2,000 pixels or more. The compressed sizes of the jpgs you quote are not relevant. The Alamy size checker app, is very useful for doing a check before uploading. http://www.braeside.plus.com/photography/alamy/alamy.html

 

Mark

Edited by M.Chapman
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I suggest you check your captions. Some captioned as a pony are not right. The Image Manager can be tricky. You need to deselect before moving to the next image or your work carries over.

 

Paulette

 

 

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What kind of camera are you using? You need a camera with at least 6 Megapixels for Alamy. A 6MP camera should give you images with a resolution of approximately 3008 x 2000 pixels, or roughly 17 MB, the minimum uncompressed file size for Alamy.

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On 28/09/2020 at 02:27, M.Chapman said:

 

For Alamy the uncompressed image size must be 17MB or more. This equates roughly to 6,000,000 pixels. So with a 3:2 format image I suggest you ensure you have 3,000 x 2,000 pixels or more. The compressed sizes of the jpgs you quote are not relevant. The Alamy size checker app, is very useful for doing a check before uploading. http://www.braeside.plus.com/photography/alamy/alamy.html

 

Mark


 So. From this and what everyone is saying, my pics should be allowed to upload. Have a brand new camera, and it's saving over the 17MB and it is still saying that it is too small. And I'm obviously not the only one having this issue. 

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3 hours ago, Shareece said:

and it's saving over the 17MB

Really if you read this thread you'll see that pixel dimensions are the best way to establish whether your files are the right size, yours may well be but perhaps you could tell us, there may be a different reason that members of this forum could help with.

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6 hours ago, Shareece said:


 So. From this and what everyone is saying, my pics should be allowed to upload. Have a brand new camera, and it's saving over the 17MB and it is still saying that it is too small. And I'm obviously not the only one having this issue. 

Looking at the sizes quoted you appear to me to be cropping your pictures so that your camera may well be taking pictures over the 17MB size but you are then cropping them to under 17MB.  Your largest picture quoted was 2701 * 2182 this is 5,896,283 pixels and comes out as 16.8 MB

 

Apologies to Shareece I got a bit mixed up here.

Edited by Chris Burrows
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On 27/09/2020 at 03:33, colin seddon said:

Hi, I wonder if anyone can answer my query.

 
I have just sent in a submission of 40 images but 5 have been rejected for being too small and not in the 3-5 mb size.
 
I have checked the images and the images are as follows;
 
AAB9502 - 2377 x 2343 - 6.15mb
 
AAB9503 - 2050 x 2377 - 5.54mb
 
DSC0025 - 2691 x 2005 - 7.59mb
 
DSC0025 - 2701 x 2183 - 6.56mb
 
DSC0033 - 2412 x 2000 - 4.82mb. 
 
Can you enlighten me as to how these images are not within the required size please.
 
What am I missing?
 
Regards
 
Colin

 

Check your settings for what size photo you shot and whether you cropped.   I have a lot of photos taken with older cameras, including one Micro 4/3rds older camera,  and learned that most of those could not be cropped at all, but the ones that were 3000 pixels by 2000 pixels and technically correct could be uploaded.

 

14 hours ago, Shareece said:


 So. From this and what everyone is saying, my pics should be allowed to upload. Have a brand new camera, and it's saving over the 17MB and it is still saying that it is too small. And I'm obviously not the only one having this issue.

 

Nope, if you're cropping, or if you don't have files that are at least 3000 pixels by 2000 pixels they won't be large enough.  

 

In the past, I have had photos refused in the uploading process for being too small, and I failed to try to upload some photos early because they exported as jpegs smaller than 6 MB, but learned to look at the questionable ones in Photoshop which will also give the expanded size.

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16 hours ago, Shareece said:


 So. From this and what everyone is saying, my pics should be allowed to upload. Have a brand new camera, and it's saving over the 17MB and it is still saying that it is too small. And I'm obviously not the only one having this issue. 

 

The issue that some new Alamy contributors often have is that they don't understand Alamy's size requirements. Here's a more detailed explanation.

 

17MB is the minimum uncompressed 8 bit image size required by Alamy. This means the uncompressed image must contain at least 17 MegaBytes (=17,825,792 bytes) of 8 bit image data. Because each pixel is defined using 3 bytes of data (1 byte each for Red, Green and Blue channels) the minimum number of pixels required by Alamy equates to 17,825,792/3 = 5,941,930 pixels

 

So, as a useful guide, just make sure your image contains at least 6 million pixels (6MP), and you'll be OK, e.g. a 3,000 x 2,000 image is fine. 

 

When you save the image in a jpg format file the image data is compressed to save disk space, so you will see the file size on your computer disk that will be considerably smaller, but that's OK.

 

If your camera has more than 6MP but you are getting images rejected as being too small, then check the following

1) You (or the camera) are not saving a cropped jpg.

2) The in camera jpg settings are not set to save a smaller (lower resolution) jpg image.

3) If you are shooting in RAW and then exporting jpgs for Alamy, check the export settings aren't downsizing the image too much.

 

Mark

 

 

Edited by M.Chapman
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10 minutes ago, M.Chapman said:

I think you meant 6MP(MegaPixels) and not MB (MegaBytes)

 

Mark

 

Mac's Finder shows them as MB.  Last submission ranged from 3.5 MB (3008x2000, resolution 240 by 240) to 18.5 MB at 5456 x 3632.   Just checked.   Lightroom just gave the dimensions.   File Info utility on the Mac gives 18,514,402 bytes (18.9 MB on disk) for the largest one.

 

The smallest sensored camera used for my last shots was a Nikon D50 (6.1-megapixel sensor).  The largest was  20 MP,  a Sony a-3000.

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18 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

 

Mac's Finder shows them as MB.  Last submission ranged from 3.5 MB (3008x2000, resolution 240 by 240) to 18.5 MB at 5456 x 3632.   Just checked.   Lightroom just gave the dimensions.   File Info utility on the Mac gives 18,514,402 bytes (18.9 MB on disk) for the largest one.

 

The smallest sensored camera used for my last shots was a Nikon D50 (6.1-megapixel sensor).  The largest was  20 MP,  a Sony a-3000.

 

The size of a jpg file on disk isn't relevant*.... I think you're in danger of confusing the OP. I still think you meant to say 6MP in your earlier post, not 6MB.

 

*For example, the compressed jpg size of 3,000 x 2,000 image will vary greatly depending on the level of detail in the image and the level of compression selected. It's not possible to make a reliable judgement about whether an image is large enough for Alamy by looking at the jpg file size on the disk. The file content needs to be inspected to determine the number of pixels in the image, or the uncompressed size (as reported in PS for example).

 

Mark

Edited by M.Chapman
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Examples:

 

"Image ABC001.jpeg"

 

[Explorer]
Image Properties
Dimensions: 5760 x 3840 pixels @ 300 dpi
Size on Disk: 3.57 MB (3,751,936 bytes) [Exported from .CR2 / File Settings - Quality 80

Size on Disk: 10.3 MB (10,899,456 bytes) [Exported from .CR2 / File Settings - Quality 100

 

[Photo Program]

Image Size
Dimensions: 5760 x 3840 pixels @ 300 Pixels/Inch
Image Size: 63.3M


[Photo Program]

Image Size
I cropped the image to:
Dimensions: 3000 x 2000 pixels @ 300 Pixels/Inch
This offers an Image Size: 17.2M

 

Open again in [Explorer]
Image Properties
Dimensions: 3000 x 2000 pixels @ 300 dpi
Size on Disk: 3.00 MB (3,149,824 bytes)

Size on Disk: 4.44 MB (4,657,152 bytes)

 

The "Image Size" on Disk/Explorer (File size) is not the same as the "Image Size" in the Photo Program.

 

andre

Edited by AM Chang
image size & quality update
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6 hours ago, M.Chapman said:

 

The size of a jpg file on disk isn't relevant*.... I think you're in danger of confusing the OP. I still think you meant to say 6MP in your earlier post, not 6MB.

 

*For example, the compressed jpg size of 3,000 x 2,000 image will vary greatly depending on the level of detail in the image and the level of compression selected. It's not possible to make a reliable judgement about whether an image is large enough for Alamy by looking at the jpg file size on the disk. The file content needs to be inspected to determine the number of pixels in the image, or the uncompressed size (as reported in PS for example).

 

Mark

 

In Photoshop,  I see the photo below as with an uncompressed size of 17.2 M (what Photoshop says, and that is probably your MP) and the physical dimensions in inches is 12.533 by 8.333.

 

I have been mining some of my older photos from the US.   I've checked the physical dimensions and made sure they were 3000 by 2000.   With sufficient detail, I haven't had a photo kicked out for being too small.   Previously, I'd been under the impression that the minimum was 6 MB for the compressed image since that seems to be the advice given in these forums.   I went and read what Alamy said about what size files would produce 17 MP or bigger files.  As low as 3.5 MB on the disk can pass, as this one did. 

 

The important test is what Photoshop or the Alamy size checked program another contributor suggested gives.  If it makes the minimum, it's passes the uploader's size check.  Details and complexity of the image do appear to matter.   I've gotten some to the minimum by adjusting shadows or highlights in the image to show more detail in the back grounds. 

 

Basically, the first poster was NOT uploading files that were minimum 3,000 by 2000 according to what he posted in his question.   My guess is that his exporting was set to create smaller files for social media.   I've had to be careful to change the export parameters when I've uploaded for Alamy after exporting for social media.  

 

 

2CWD4GR.jpg

Edited by MizBrown
Clarification.
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7 hours ago, AM Chang said:

 

 

 

The "Image Size" on Disk/Explorer (File size) is not the same as the "Image Size" in the Photo Program.

 

andre

 

From Alamy's Guidelines for Submitting Images:   "File size of over 17MB (when uncompressed/open)
Your JPEG file is likely to have a compressed size of 3-5MB. Opening a JPEG in an image program such as Adobe Photoshop will show you the uncompressed/open file size."

 

My suspicions are that the OP and the person who piggyback on the question had export settings that created smaller sized files (dimensions mentioned in the first post).   When I'm importing to social media, I reduced the size of the photo.  When I'm exporting for Alamy, I don't.   We've gone round and round on this because we don't know how the posters with problems were exporting their .jpegs for Alamy.   Exporting to a phone can shrink things.  Setting smaller long dimensions can shrink things. 

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14 hours ago, MizBrown said:

 

In Photoshop,  I see the photo below as with an uncompressed size of 17.2 M (what Photoshop says, and that is probably your MP) and the physical dimensions in inches is 12.533 by 8.333.

 

I have been mining some of my older photos from the US.   I've checked the physical dimensions and made sure they were 3000 by 2000.   With sufficient detail, I haven't had a photo kicked out for being too small.   Previously, I'd been under the impression that the minimum was 6 MB for the compressed image since that seems to be the advice given in these forums.   I went and read what Alamy said about what size files would produce 17 MP or bigger files.  As low as 3.5 MB on the disk can pass, as this one did. 

 

The important test is what Photoshop or the Alamy size checked program another contributor suggested gives.  If it makes the minimum, it's passes the uploader's size check.  Details and complexity of the image do appear to matter.   I've gotten some to the minimum by adjusting shadows or highlights in the image to show more detail in the back grounds. 

 

Basically, the first poster was NOT uploading files that were minimum 3,000 by 2000 according to what he posted in his question.   My guess is that his exporting was set to create smaller files for social media.   I've had to be careful to change the export parameters when I've uploaded for Alamy after exporting for social media.  

 

 

2CWD4GR.jpg

 

As Mr Chapman said you have to be careful not to confuse. The minimum size is 6MP not 6MB also uncompressed file size is 17MB not 17MP.

As other posters have said, it's simple, people should forget about size on disk etc, if the image dimensions in pixels multiplied together is greater than 6000000 you are good to go

Edited by Martin L
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On 30/09/2020 at 07:47, spacecadet said:

I see the Red Arrows are flying again. Those chaps do a lot of reading. No asking the forum at 500kt.

I gave you 2 green (on two different posts) just to compensate the red ones.

If the OP doesn't get the 'size" idea I wonder what he(she)'s doing here (or anywhere else) instead of going to the photography nursery to say the

least ...

Edited by Ognyan Yosifov
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18 hours ago, MizBrown said:

In Photoshop,  I see the photo below as with an uncompressed size of 17.2 M (what Photoshop says, and that is probably your MP) and the physical dimensions in inches is 12.533 by 8.333.

 

No The number you see in Photoshop (17.2M) is the number of megabytes (MB) occupied by the uncompressed image in Photoshop. It's is not the same as the number of MegaPixels (MP) in the image. This following shows how the number in Photoshop (MB) is related to the MegaPixels in your image.

 

A 3,000 x 2,000 image contains 6,000,000 pixels (= 6Megapixels or 6MP)

In 8-bit mode, a 6,000,000 pixel image uses three 8-bit bytes for each pixel (one byte each for R, G and B channels) giving 18,000,0000 bytes in total.

1 Megabyte (1MB) is 1,024 x 1,024 bytes = 1,048,576 bytes (binary computer systems use a slightly different definition of Mega).

So, to get the storage occupied by the uncompressed image in MB, divide 18,000,000 by 1,048,576 which gives 17.166MB, which Photoshop displays as 17.2M (Just above Alamy's requirement of 17MB).

 

Note, if working in 16 bit mode, every pixel uses six bytes of storage (two 8-bit bytes each for R, G & B). So in 16 bit mode a 3,000 x 2,000 image will show an uncompressed size in PS of 34.3M

 

Mark

 

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30 minutes ago, Martin L said:

 

As Mr Chapman said you have to be careful not to confuse. The minimum size is 6MP not 6MB also uncompressed file size is 17MB not 17MP.

As other posters have said, it's simple, people should forget about size on disk etc, if the image dimensions in pixels multiplied together is greater than 6000000 you are good to go

 

The thing is we need to ask them what settings they have on their export program.   Period.   I suggest people re-read what Alamy said about exporting photos. 

 

What I noticed, which another guy also noticed, was that the files that the original poster were rejected were smaller that 3,000 pixels by 2,000 pixels.  You guys seem to have decided that that trying to correct me was more important than explaining to two other guys why their files were rejected by Alamy for something other than a capricious reason.   It doesn't matter how people get to appropriate minimum size or how they gauge that they can export these files and not those. 

 

As Mr. Chapman didn't say, ask questions about what their export setting were.   All this is irrelevant if they were producing smaller than 3,000 by 2,000 pixel files.

 

Size on the disk is a good gauge for what might or might not export at 17 MB uncompressed.   Open in Photoshop or in the Alamy size checker to be sure.  I've done this with older 6.2 MP camera files (checked with Google to get the shooting size for the Nikon D-50).

These guys said they were shooting with cameras with many more MP.   The only way I can produce smaller than 3,000 by 2,000 pixel files is either exporting reduced files, or cropping a whole lot.

Whatever.   That I'm can export acceptable files that I shot years ago with a Nikon D50 is probably not to the point when they're refusing to look at how they might have exported files that were too small from a camera that shouldn't have needed special handling other than not setting the export parameters to too small a size on the long end.  Unless it was a small sensor camera, but that shouldn't affect size, just quality in other ways.

 

The first poster listed the dimensions of the files he tried to submit.  They were too small.   How that happens generally is not changing export parameters used earlier for exporting photos for social media.   If the camera was satisfactory and with at least a Micro 4/3rds sized sensor, then the reason they were producing files too small (dimensions in pixels as I just checked with Lightroom's export function) was that they were reducing the photo dimensions.

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

 

The thing is we need to ask them what settings they have on their export program.   Period.   I suggest people re-read what Alamy said about exporting photos. 

 

What I noticed, which another guy also noticed, was that the files that the original poster were rejected were smaller that 3,000 pixels by 2,000 pixels.  You guys seem to have decided that that trying to correct me was more important than explaining to two other guys why their files were rejected by Alamy for something other than a capricious reason.   It doesn't matter how people get to appropriate minimum size or how they gauge that they can export these files and not those. 

 

As Mr. Chapman didn't say, ask questions about what their export setting were.   All this is irrelevant if they were producing smaller than 3,000 by 2,000 pixel files.

 

Size on the disk is a good gauge for what might or might not export at 17 MB uncompressed.   Open in Photoshop or in the Alamy size checker to be sure.  I've done this with older 6.2 MP camera files (checked with Google to get the shooting size for the Nikon D-50).

These guys said they were shooting with cameras with many more MP.   The only way I can produce smaller than 3,000 by 2,000 pixel files is either exporting reduced files, or cropping a whole lot.

Whatever.   That I'm can export acceptable files that I shot years ago with a Nikon D50 is probably not to the point when they're refusing to look at how they might have exported files that were too small from a camera that shouldn't have needed special handling other than not setting the export parameters to too small a size on the long end.  Unless it was a small sensor camera, but that shouldn't affect size, just quality in other ways.

 

The first poster listed the dimensions of the files he tried to submit.  They were too small.   How that happens generally is not changing export parameters used earlier for exporting photos for social media.   If the camera was satisfactory and with at least a Micro 4/3rds sized sensor, then the reason they were producing files too small (dimensions in pixels as I just checked with Lightroom's export function) was that they were reducing the photo dimensions.

 

 

 

 

The OP was not asking why or how they were too small,  just why they were rejected when he was getting confused with the limit of uncompressed size and disk size

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