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Chris Burrows

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About Chris Burrows

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    Forum newbie

Alamy

  • Alamy URL
    https://www.alamy.com/contrib-browse.asp?cid={59C7A9D9-2016-460A-9221-553FE05BAFEF}&name=Christopher+Burrows
  • Images
    5470
  • Joined Alamy
    11 Jan 2004

Recent Profile Visitors

402 profile views
  1. I see that this magazine is published by Bauer media. I know that Alamy have licenced pictures of mine to Bauer with free re-uses for the next five years, so this might be the reason nothing showing yet.
  2. Thanks for this. Been using this for over four months and never noticed the text search. Found over a dozen uses for my ISSN list.
  3. Yes you're right I have got a bit mixed up here,
  4. Looking at the sizes quoted you appear to me to be cropping your pictures so that your camera may well be taking pictures over the 17MB size but you are then cropping them to under 17MB. Your largest picture quoted was 2701 * 2182 this is 5,896,283 pixels and comes out as 16.8 MB Apologies to Shareece I got a bit mixed up here.
  5. Found one of mine and also one that had been wrongly captioned, slightly annoying as I had several there that were correctly captioned.
  6. Only occasionally when doing a very small flower, most of the time just the macro is enough. I do seem to struggle with focus when the macro is combined with an extension tube, usually end up with focus in the wrong place more often than not.
  7. My 105mm Sigma macro is the lens I use for probably 99% of the time. It is the only lens I have for my full frame camera that is used for nearly all my stock pictures.
  8. I would not give up the "single macro flower shots" There is definitely a demand for these if they are captioned with full details of species and cultivar if applicable, as yours are.. Mix them up with wider shots by all means but carry on with some of them.
  9. Very wise. Sometimes the difference between two cultivars can be something almost un-noticeable. I grew two tulip cultivars this year, one was a sport of the other. Their flowers were identical, the only difference was a slightly different shade of green to the leaves.
  10. Displace was not the word was not referring to and to be honest I have no idea what a Booleans is. The OP queried why " a search ‘red squirrel’ brings up photos of grey squirrels where the word ‘red’ has never been used in the keywords." I was pointing out that the phrase "displace red squirrels" which appears in several of the OP's pictures of grey squirrels includes the word red. EDIT From Alamy advice on tagging "Our tagging system does not exclude constituent words of a tag from being searched for e.g. “Banff National Park” will still show up for “banff”,”national park” and “p
  11. You have the search term "displace red squirrels" in the keywords for some of the pictures. My knowledge of keywords and how phrases are searched is limited, I gave up trying to understand alamy's keyword changes years ago, but I think this is what is causing them to come up in searches for red squirrels.
  12. Possibly Cosmos bipinnatus 'Psyche' this one has the extra centre petals and comes in mixed or a white only selection.
  13. If you want to sell pictures of flowers/vegetables you do need to do a bit more research 2C8JBJA Red flowers hanging from a branch This is a fuchsia but that will not help a great deal you really need the species and if applicable the cultivar, Applies to most of your flower pictures. 2C8JBWY Fresh green runner beans growing from the stalk Do not look like runner beans to me, not 100% certain but these look like radish pods. I would also avoid offering the same pictures on Alamy and a microstock site.
  14. Noticed your picture Marigold Tagetes flower bud - Image ID: 2C16DG9 I am afraid that flowers can get a little confusing,there are two species often called marigold, what you have here is a Calendula probably calendula officinalis, not a Tagetes. This is commonly known as the Common marigold Pot marigold or English marigold plus a few other names. It is part of the daisy family and probably originated in Europe The Tagetes species, most common ones the French marigold and African marigold are the ones related to sunflowers and originating in Mexico.
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