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Asked to remove images


GaryH
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Hi and thank you in advance, 

 

I've been contributing on alamy for a couple of years but Never posted here before I am struggling to find the information I need online, I would be grateful if anyone had any knowledge on the subject. 

 

I have been contacted by quite a large UK company asking me to remove some images I have on various stock sites, they are images are of some of their staff at work in the street (no faces as shot from behind but the companies logo is visible on the back of the uniform) they are all marked as editorial only, to be honest they arent images that would win any award so I thought I would just delete them but I do wonder where i stand legally in the UK?

 

Thanks again 

 

Gary 

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I had a little more communication with them this evening after I had ask for clarification on why I should remove the images. 

 

They said that because I hadn't asked permission to take the images of a member of their staff and their logo was present they should be removed, they obviously don't know what they are talking about and it seems like they are making it up as they go along, I've decided to leave the images up and stop communication with them, it will be interesting to see where it goes from here, I expect nowhere. 

 

They actually got my email through my business Facebook page, I wonder how many other images are like this online, there must be hundreds of not thousands. 

 

Anyway thank you all for the advice, its very much appreciated, if I receive anything remotely legal I will share the outcome. 

 

Thanks again

Gary 

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Bear in mind that whatever you decide your images won't disappear immediately if you delete them, Alamy say it can take 6 months unless you can convince them that it is a special case. Actually companies often contact Alamy directly if they, or their lawyers, perceive that there are pictures that they don't want on here and Alamy remove them and contact you to say why if they they think the lawyers have a point, or if it's not worth the aggro. Of course we don't get to hear about the ones that they defend and on the face of it it's hard to see what objection this company could have if your pictures were taken in a public place and they are marked as 'Editorial only' as you've done.

Edited by Harry Harrison
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I don't know enough about this, but maybe (if they haven't already done so), it's worth asking on what legal basis they are requesting the  photos be removed - specifically, which law they are using as the basis for their request. Presumably on the basis that faces aren't shown, it wouldn't be for invasion of privacy.

Edited by Steve F
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...sounds like they're trying to bully the photographer.

Contact contributors@alamy.com and ask their opinion.

 

I think if they have any valid reason to see the images removed then they should be contacting the agency not the photographer.

 

If any of the pictured employees did not qualify for a UK work permit then maybe there would be a problem there ?

 

You could try contacting The Guardian newspaper - they are sometimes interested in this type of issue.

 

GD

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I think I would be referring them to Alamy. There's rarely any legal basis to object to images taken in public in the UK, especially if they are in context of a street scene and not concentrating on the logo. Steve mentioned privacy but there's no right to privacy anywhere in the UK, especially not on the street.

Can you point us to one or two of the images? It's not obvious which ones they are from your port.

On a wider point, we do need to defend our right to take and use images.

Edited by spacecadet
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8 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

I think I would be referring them to Alamy. There's rarely any legal basis to object to images taken in public in the UK, especially if they are in context of a street scene and not concentrating on the logo. Steve mentioned privacy but there's no right to privacy anywhere in the UK, especially not on the street.

Can you point us to one or two of the images? It's not obvious which ones they are from your port.

On a wider point, we do need to defend our right to take and use images.

+10!

Phil

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14 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

I think I would be referring them to Alamy. There's rarely any legal basis to object to images taken in public in the UK, especially if they are in context of a street scene and not concentrating on the logo. Steve mentioned privacy but there's no right to privacy anywhere in the UK, especially not on the street.

Can you point us to one or two of the images? It's not obvious which ones they are from your port.

On a wider point, we do need to defend our right to take and use images.

Thank you for your reply 

 

I will try and pop the images in question on here this afternoon, although I say I am happy to delete them I do have frustration if I am perfectly entitled to take the image, I have asked them to clarify their legal point of view to see what they come up with, hopefully I will have some more info a bit later today 

 

Gary 

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3 minutes ago, GaryH said:

Thank you for your reply 

 

I will try and pop the images in question on here this afternoon, although I say I am happy to delete them I do have frustration if I am perfectly entitled to take the image, I have asked them to clarify their legal point of view to see what they come up with, hopefully I will have some more info a bit later today 

 

Gary 

You could just quote a couple of the image references- it has six (now eight) characters.

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If the logo isn't relevant could you not remove the logo in Photoshop and re-submit?

 

I've done this a few times to avoid such issues, for example - BRXWP6

 

Edit - also my thinking was/is that it might increase the chances of a sale, for instance a company might like the image but won't use it because it advertises one of their competitors.

Edited by Vincent Lowe
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6 hours ago, spacecadet said:

I think I would be referring them to Alamy. There's rarely any legal basis to object to images taken in public in the UK, especially if they are in context of a street scene and not concentrating on the logo. Steve mentioned privacy but there's no right to privacy anywhere in the UK, especially not on the street.

Can you point us to one or two of the images? It's not obvious which ones they are from your port.

On a wider point, we do need to defend our right to take and use images.

Hi here are the ID of the images in question

 

2A3Y6RR

RMM6BC

T0K4XK

 

Many thanks 

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3 hours ago, Mr Standfast said:

I think they are taking the mickey! UK newspapers are full of pictures such as your description.  

 

Is it Colas? 

 

James

Spot on James, have you had this before? 

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3 hours ago, Vincent Lowe said:

If the logo isn't relevant could you not remove the logo in Photoshop and re-submit?

 

I've done this a few times to avoid such issues, for example - BRXWP6

 

Edit - also my thinking was/is that it might increase the chances of a sale, for instance a company might like the image but won't use it because it advertises one of their competitors.

Thank you, I will look at doing this, that's a good point. 

 

Gary 

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4 hours ago, Vincent Lowe said:

If the logo isn't relevant could you not remove the logo in Photoshop and re-submit?

 

I've done this a few times to avoid such issues, for example - BRXWP6

 

Edit - also my thinking was/is that it might increase the chances of a sale, for instance a company might like the image but won't use it because it advertises one of their competitors.

He doesn't need to do that. It's the most innocuous image imaginable and the logo is in no way prominent- not that there'd be any problem if it were.

OP, Colblimp's idea is quite understandable but you don't want to provoke- even being right can cause grief with lawyers. Presumably the legal basis of the request was mentioned in their letter to you, if not you could ask what it was.

But I'd be inclined to say that I could see no reason to remove the images as they were lawfully obtained and were on offer for lawful purposes. Or  you could say nothing and refer the request to Alamy.

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7 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

He doesn't need to do that. It's the most innocuous image imaginable and the logo is in no way prominent- not that there'd be any problem if it were.

 

I know he doesn't need to do it but I suggested it as an option to avoid the hassle.

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7 minutes ago, GaryH said:

Spot on James, have you had this before? 

Gary, I had a cheeky look at your pictures, hey we all do it! 🙂 I saw one which matched your description, a chap with Colas on his jacket.  Images of this sort are commonly used in the press on an editorial basis. 

 

 

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Mr Standfast said:

Gary, I had a cheeky look at your pictures, hey we all do it! 🙂 I saw one which matched your description, a chap with Colas on his jacket.  Images of this sort are commonly used in the press on an editorial basis. 

 

 

 

 

Some pretty solid detective work there 🙂

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