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English Term please


Guest Stockfotoart
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Handcart (one word or two, with or without hyphen) sounds fine to me. We tend to use wheelbarrows instead, at least in the garden.

Or trolley.

Again, the picture's a bit small.

Edited by spacecadet
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In Dutch this is a Bolderkar.  US: Beach Wagon or Beach Cart.

Non native speaker though.

 

wim

 

edit: auf Deutsch wie auch auf Niederländisch ein Strandwagen.

edit2: I stand corrected: it's Beach Wagon and Beach Cart both in the US. Not sure now about the UK.

Edited by wiskerke
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3 hours ago, Stockfotoart said:

 

;) what dic are you using Wim?

I gave up Leo recently but the one I am using now doesn't seem any better

 

I didn't know Leo. Thanks for the suggestion.

For German, I use Duden.de.

For UK/US English I use Dictionary.com which has a Thesaurus.com as well.

For the difference between UK and US I use a whole slew of sites, which however don't always last long.

Some of the best have now disappeared.

My French is so bad I cannot even pretend to speak it despite the 9 years I had it in school.

So for that and everything else there's Google Trans which with a little care and cross checking is good enough.

 

wim

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1 hour ago, MizBrown said:

If it has four wheels, it's a wagon.  Hard to see this with the first photo, even enlarged.  Carts tend to be two wheeled.  

 

Good point, MizBrown. 

 

Wim, the only thing I can say in French is je ne parle pas francais . . . but I say it beautifully. 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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4 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

If it has four wheels, it's a wagon.  Hard to see this with the first photo, even enlarged.  Carts tend to be two wheeled.  

 

True, that's how it used to be.

Wikipedia however says:

Over time, the term "cart" has come to mean nearly any small conveyance, from shopping carts to golf carts, without regard to number of wheels, load carried, or means of propulsion.

And see Google Images:

Beach Cart.

Beach Wagon.

However this wooden one seems to be very European. All the American ones are either foldable or a sort of Radio Flyers.

The European ones usually fit 2 to 4 kids, but there are bigger ones, electric even. Which look like a Segway married to a big bathtub. The school across the street uses one and the little kids think it's lots of fun. If I would know how to keyword that one I might think of a way to photograph it.

 

wim

 

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4 minutes ago, wiskerke said:

 

True, that's how it used to be.

Wikipedia however says:

Over time, the term "cart" has come to mean nearly any small conveyance, from shopping carts to golf carts, without regard to number of wheels, load carried, or means of propulsion.

And see Google Images:

Beach Cart.

Beach Wagon.

However this wooden one seems to be very European. All the American ones are either foldable or a sort of Radio Flyers.

The European ones usually fit 2 to 4 kids, but there are bigger ones, electric even. Which look like a Segway married to a big bathtub. The school across the street uses one and the little kids think it's lots of fun. If I would know how to keyword that one I might think of a way to photograph it.

 

wim

 

 

I'd use both terms for key wording/tagging.  I wouldn't use trolley except for what us US citizens call a shopping cart (four wheels, wire body).   Some of those Google images were of the same things.  The four wheel thingies used in gardens are generally called wagons; two wheeled ones are carts most of the time.  All this seems derived from horse vehicles usage.  Garden wagons in the US can have wooden sides.  Also can be called garden carts.   Wagon seems more to refer to four wheeled things (though not always).  Cart seems to be more loosely defined, at least on Google Images (search for "garden cart.").  

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