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29 minutes ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

Again thank you all for your help, I am very relieved! ¬† ¬†Also do you think I should now format the external drive I backed up yesterday with Catalina and do another back up of this, or just leave alone, sorry if this sounds a really dumb question.ūüėü

 

Carol

 

 

Definitely leave the backup alone for a while until you are sure everything is working. 

 

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Posted (edited)

OK I thought I had a problem with disabling with password on start up but I think I've sorted itūüôŹ - time for a glass of wine, thanks again everyone for all your help.....

 

Carol

Edited by CAROL SAUNDERS
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30 minutes ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

OK I have a slight niggle.......it's to do with the password prompt when the Mac boots up - I've tried disabling it by reading various things on Google but it hasn't worked.  I'm not sure whether it's something to do with an iCloud password.  After the installation it asked me to make a choose a new password this I have to input now so I'm a bit confused again.  I'm sure it's something simple I'm not doing.  Any help appreciated.

 

Carol

 

I'd never configure a machine to boot up without a password, but I live in a place where burglaries are not unheard of, and I turn my iMac off at night.  Try going to System Preferences, Users & Groups,  Login Options and turn on Automatic Login.   You have to click the lock and enter your new password before you can turn on automatic log on.

 

Let me know if that works.   I'm not going to apply it to test on my own machine. 

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9 minutes ago, MizBrown said:

 

I'd never configure a machine to boot up without a password, but I live in a place where burglaries are not unheard of, and I turn my iMac off at night.  Try going to System Preferences, Users & Groups,  Login Options and turn on Automatic Login.   You have to click the lock and enter your new password before you can turn on automatic log on.

 

Let me know if that works.   I'm not going to apply it to test on my own machine. 

Ah thank you, you replied so quickly before I mentioned that I had it sorted, so thank you.   However I'm now wondering how many of us log on with a password or not each time....

 

Carol

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1 minute ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

Ah thank you, you replied so quickly before I mentioned that I had it sorted, so thank you.   However I'm now wondering how many of us log on with a password or not each time....

 

Carol

 

My machines' passwords are something that I haven't used on a web site.  If a credit card is connected to a web site, I make that unique and not shared (and use my Nicaraguan bank card if possible)  I've been had stuff nicked from two different houses -- one here and one in Philadelphia.   There was a major hack of LiveJournal and I've gotten the emails claiming that the writer was in my machine and wanted a BitCoin bribe to leave me alone.   The password was unique to LiveJournal and my account there was closed several years ago, so I just ignored the two different emails.    My dad was forever clicking on spam links and got dosed with malware fairly often.  

 

And a US government employment site was hacked a few years ago -- and I have some company in Virginia doing security screening at the government's expense.   It was free for three years.   The bigger the organization, the stupider their IT security.   When I ran a small hobby Usenet server, everything was locked down and I monitored who was logged in.  I also had a mail server and people ran attempts on that every day, sometimes coming within a letter or two of one of my user's names. 

 

I did have a senior moment and forgot my iPad's login.   Did figure it out after a while. 

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1 hour ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

Ah thank you, you replied so quickly before I mentioned that I had it sorted, so thank you.   However I'm now wondering how many of us log on with a password or not each time....

 

Carol


I go a step further and have FileVault 2 AND the EFI password switched on. The former means the Mac won’t even start the boot process without my password and the latter means if a would be thief tried to tamper with it or change the boot order they’d also be locked out. Back up to encrypted drives stored in different locations and you cover almost all bases. 

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1 hour ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

However I'm now wondering how many of us log on with a password or not each time....

 

Carol

 

I have automatic login turned off on my Mac's, additionally the MacBook Air's I often carry in my shoulder bag and back pack have FileVault enabled.

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A thief would have a job with mine. It's chained to a radiator.;)

Not a LT though.

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1 hour ago, CAROL SAUNDERS said:

However I'm now wondering how many of us log on with a password or not each time

Definitely, every time. Especially important if also using the keychain for storing passwords for websites etc. Also turn on FileVault and encrypt the main drive and any backups.

 

Mark

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On the Mac you can set up the log in screen to also include your own message that you write yourself. I use it to to give a written clue, for my wife or executors, as to the password. 

 

A clue that would help only you or a very close family member. A clue too difficult for strangers to guess, easy for you to remember. A password like where and how you lost your virginity. But not an easy one like the name of your dog.

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9 minutes ago, Bill Brooks said:

But not an easy one like the name of your dog.

 

As you say, pet names are very weak, but are surprisingly common passwords. A year or two back I noticed a new wifi network had appeared. When a close new neighbour appeared and they were calling their cat in late at night, I joined their wifi network with the cats name. A very weak choice, so are football clubs. Some use the same password everywhere.

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14 minutes ago, Bill Brooks said:

On the Mac you can set up the log in screen to also include your own message that you write yourself. I use it to to give a written clue, for my wife or executors, as to the password. 

 

A clue that would help only you or a very close family member. A clue too difficult for strangers to guess, easy for you to remember. A password like where and how you lost your virginity. But not an easy one like the name of your dog.

Your second para made me laugh so thank you for thatūüėĄūüėĄ¬†I don't have any pets.

 

However, I will definately give the password boot up more thought.......and check the File Vault is turned on...

 

Carol

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Yes I agree - always use a login password and don’t enable auto login. You can enable resetting your login password using your Apple ID which is probably a very good idea. The security with Big Sur appears to prevent seeing anything on the internal drive if you start up from an external drive so File Vault may not be necessary now to prevent the data on the disk being accessed from an external startup disk.
 

I would worry about setting a firmware password in case something went wrong as recovery could be very difficult. Incidentally, I had something very strange happen with my login password a few days ago. Not sure what happened but I couldn’t use my login password to unlock my account or to view any saved passwords in Safari. Strangely I was able to login from a restart. Extremely odd. I was, however, able to change the password without typing in the existing password and I used that to get things back. I have never had anything like that happen and have no idea what caused it. I had been on my energy supplier site as there was something about a hack so to be on the safe side I actually did a complete clean install of Big Sur, erasing the internal drive in the process. I now have password recovery from Apple ID turned on. 
 

 

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Once I did bless the use of a pet name by a cat-sitting client. They had flown off to Scotland without giving me any contact information and in their rush they set the alarm on their townhouse. They had never given me the code and hadn't been using the alarm when I was feeding their cats. So when I came into the house the alarm was triggered and the security people called their home phone. Fortunately, I knew I had to answer it. When they asked for the secret password I said "Ozzie?????". Yes, the cat Ozzie was the password. Whew!

 

Paulette

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One thing is that your machine is more valuable to thieves than the stuff on it, but they're more interested in laptops than full sized office machines.  The remote hacks are after credit cards, bank information, or your password to sites where you may have a credit card or bank information listed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, NYCat said:

So when I came into the house the alarm was triggered and the security people called their home phone. Fortunately, I knew I had to answer it. When they asked for the secret password I said "Ozzie?????". Yes, the cat Ozzie was the password. Whew!

 

Paulette

 

Something similar happened to me around 25 years ago that I've never forgotten. I was a fairly regular visitor to a friend living in Syke, on the outskirts of Rochdale, Yorkshire, UK. Les had suggested when he was away on holiday down south I should bring the family up to stay in his empty house and use it as a base to explore the wonders of Yorkshire. Les posted me a key with a tie on label attached with the alarm password on it. When we arrived and opened the door a low volume beeping started, I keyed in the alarm number, it wasn't accepted. The beeping note intensified until the exterior alarm went off very loudly. It was a basic alarm without Redcare monitoring. I phoned Les, he put his wife on and she swore at him and gave me the correct code. None of the neighbours took any notice.

 

Now back to Big Sur. The 2015 i7 8GB 13" MacBook Air I've been using to trial Big Sur has been running without any issues. I've been using it to edit small batches of images in the current Photoshop CC, no issues. Photo Mechanic has been running OK, although Camera Bits don't currently recommend using with Big Sur. Filezilla connects to the Alamy server and 2 others OK. Looking good. I need to add some basic quick and easy video editing software, just for HD video clips, this is new to me.

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