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I will be covering the General Election.  However, I find it difficult at both a local and national level.  Despite asking the local political parties to but me on their mailing lists etc. I tend to find that does not happen and I find out campaigning events by chance if at all.  I also have an expectation that the few “public” meetings will be ticket only and not announced until after the event in the interests of "security" (Despite having a Press card and access to Downing Street). National events tend to have press access only for the likes of PA, Reuters etc; understandable but frustrating.  As a photojournalist I want to give the widest possible coverage to election activities but, as a freelance it is next to impossible; which is a sad reflection of where we are in this democracy...…

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Really a shame! Hope you get more access. Can Alamy Live News help you out? 

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We had Corbyn and Farage in Southend during the 2017 campaign and I tried to give chase using social media spots but I was always one step behind and never caught them. It's one of those situations where it's not worth trying to compete with the big boys but rather to think locally, so I'll be doing the same again.

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I'm almost certain I'm going to travel to the UK to cover the election.  Locally, of course.

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I'm trying to get some politician pictures, but the competion is a lot better at it then me. What I am confident about is getting some topical editorial pictures that can/might be used to fill in the gaps.

Good luck eveyone!

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15 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

I will be covering the General Election.  However, I find it difficult at both a local and national level.  Despite asking the local political parties to but me on their mailing lists etc. I tend to find that does not happen and I find out campaigning events by chance if at all.  I also have an expectation that the few “public” meetings will be ticket only and not announced until after the event in the interests of "security" (Despite having a Press card and access to Downing Street). National events tend to have press access only for the likes of PA, Reuters etc; understandable but frustrating.  As a photojournalist I want to give the widest possible coverage to election activities but, as a freelance it is next to impossible; which is a sad reflection of where we are in this democracy...…

You need to get access to the press diary somehow......there may be other agencies who you can contribute to who get it.

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As Marianne said, get in touch with Alamy News. Let them know you're available for any coverage in your area etc.

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Ian, like you I shall be covering the General Election mainly on a local and regional level, i.e. East Midlands over the next few weeks. You are right it can be difficult in knowing when and where an event is taking place and obtaining media accreditation. For me Ian its trade off and trust. Let me explain. Firstly I got to know your my local candidate that was campaigning in the area, door knocking, leafleting, etc explaining who you are and where the images are going to be used, offering few free © images as a trade off. Most candidates are fine with this even better, if there is a high political figure with them also promising to supply the regional office with similar images for use in their campaign material. This approach lead to my first major political event, the launch of the labour Party 2017 election campaign in Leicester with Jeremy Corbyn obtained a media pass from the regional office with on problem. From this approach I’am now invited to cover not only to local events but major launches, speeches, annual conference etc. but also private functions with the main leader or senior shadow cabinet figures and in doing so gaining their trust.

 

Yes there are time you are asked to cover a launch in which the P.A., Reuters, etc are invited. My method in these cases is by all means is take images from the launch but then follow the politician to smaller meetings afterwards, in which the press are not interested in covering. At these meetings because the person is more relaxed and comfortable and are familiar with you, you are more likely to get more intimate shoots than otherwise be possible at the major event and in sometimes help you with the shoot. See images below taken when the main press have go home and where a lot of my sales are generated from.

 

Ian, I hope this is some help and do not forget the local count.

P.S. it also lead to my first music gig last summer.

 

 

 

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Edited by Alan Beastall
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8 hours ago, vpics said:

As Marianne said, get in touch with Alamy News. Let them know you're available for any coverage in your area etc.

Alamy News has already been in touch and offered me accreditation to an election event; unfortunately I had already planned to cover a cabinet meeting which is on at the same time. (and I frequently get good sales from cabinet pictures)   I am more than happy with the support from Alamy News and always feel very guilty when I am unable to help.  I have childcare responsibilities which stop me doing as much as I would like; but these will fall away as the children get older.  

 

My rant was more about the way the political parties, both local and national restrict access during the election campaign.  I do subscribe to a very expensive news wire that gives me notice of events; the issue is getting accreditation  The amount of real public contact is getting smaller and smaller as events are heavily stage managed and only the faithful and those journalists who indulge in "corporate" journalism are invited.  (OK, that may be a bit harsh) I am just worried that UK politicians (I cannot speak about other countries) are getting more and more distant from the people they represent.  Not, in my view, good for democracy.

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17 hours ago, IanDavidson said:

I am just worried that UK politicians (I cannot speak about other countries) are getting more and more distant from the people they represent.  Not, in my view, good for democracy.

 

This is not in the least bit surprising given the terrible abuse many British politicians have been subject to recently. So many politicans, particularly women, many of whom are at the peak of their careers, are not standing for re-election because of death threats, rape and other forms of extreme violence. 

 

The approach of Bojo and his cohorts has clearly exacerbated the situation. The events on the day that Parliament returned after the illegal prorogation were unbelievable, particularly the language used by Bojo - military analogies, the Surrender Act and so on. It is no surprise that labelling MPs as traitors and trying to paint the current political landscape as one of Parliament against the people results in politicians being ultra-careful in dealing with the public. I have never been a great lover of politicians but I have to say I have huge admiration for those who have stood up for their principles and the principles of democracy against a tide of populism, spin, fake news and threats of severe violence - people like Dominic Grieve, Anna Soubry and Jess Phillips to name a few. 

 

Yes democracy in Britain is under threat and sadly this is only likely to get worse as things become more polarised. Fake news and suppression of truth have become acceptable, the latest being the non-publication of the report on Russian interference in British politics until after the election. The alarming thing is that a very large proportion of the population is not even interested in the truth, preferring to consume the simplistic sound bites that pepper the front pages of the papers or whatever propaganda is aimed at them on social media. Troubled times indeed.

 

 

Edited by MDM
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