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Linda

What to do with old software programs?

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Linda, I didn't mean to insinuate that you might not have the space for stuff. I've seen apartments bigger than lots of houses. The thought of moving does focus the mind! When I was gearing up to sell my London House back a good few years, I stripped down a lot as I meant to get down to a level I could pretty well shift myself in my modest camper van. But 25 years later, a generous 5 bedroom house with loft, cellar AND BARN seem barely adequate. Jane does put things up for auction and deposits at charity shops but I think that is more to do with making room for more shopping. One of my weaknesses is ladders, but I'm not the only photographer with a range of access gear.

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:) Linda had a post on here talking about that book, Dusty; I was just gently kidding her. Luckily she has a good sense of humor.  B)

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:) Linda had a post on here talking about that book, Dusty; I was just gently kidding her. Luckily she has a good sense of humor. B)

Okay :-) . . . sorry, Linda, missed your reference to the book . . . and, Ed, how could anyone think you would indulge in anything less chivalrous than gentle kidding? :)

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo

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I'm also a hoarder but was recently persuaded by the Mrs that it really was necessary to throw out two old computers. I hate the idea of trashing working equipment but was pleased to discover a local company that will take used IT kit ( computers, modems, printers whatever), formally wipe the discs and give a certificate to that effect, and either find new users or break down the computers into component parts for recycling. It's a free service and  they appear to be taking on young lads who cannot find other work.

 

For anyone else living in the NE with IT kit to dispose of, you might try Acorn Community Reuse & Recycling - I have no connection with this business other than as a satisfied customer.

I did something similar a few years ago with all my old Mac's but out of nostalgia, kept my original, tiny screened Mac Classic which now sits as an ornament-cum-bookend on one of my studio shelves. 

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I was listening to a very gloomy piece on Radio 4 this morning about access to old files. As we move along from system to system with upgrade after upgrade we isolate ourselves from old files. Paper copies last centuries with just a few precautions, but some digital correspondence will be very difficult to access after as little as a decade

 

So that seems to make a case for keeping some old software in case it might be useful as a kind of can opener. A redundant Mac or PC in the attic might save the day. That's me being negative again!

 

I used to use WordPerfect for Mac in preference to Microsoft Word. Support for WordPerfect for Macs ended ten years ago. I did go through a lot of files making conversions but I suspect even those are getting towards their end-of-life.

 

Data recovery can be very expensive so a little self-help might be a good plan

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I was listening to a very gloomy piece on Radio 4 this morning about access to old files. As we move along from system to system with upgrade after upgrade we isolate ourselves from old files. Paper copies last centuries with just a few precautions, but some digital correspondence will be very difficult to access after as little as a decade

 

 

Some more on the subject here, by the Google boss.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/feb/13/google-boss-warns-forgotten-century-email-photos-vint-cerf

 

another article here (BBC)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31450389

Edited by AlbertSnapper

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I was listening to a very gloomy piece on Radio 4 this morning about access to old files. As we move along from system to system with upgrade after upgrade we isolate ourselves from old files. Paper copies last centuries with just a few precautions, but some digital correspondence will be very difficult to access after as little as a decade

 

So that seems to make a case for keeping some old software in case it might be useful as a kind of can opener. A redundant Mac or PC in the attic might save the day. That's me being negative again!

 

I used to use WordPerfect for Mac in preference to Microsoft Word. Support for WordPerfect for Macs ended ten years ago. I did go through a lot of files making conversions but I suspect even those are getting towards their end-of-life.

 

Data recovery can be very expensive so a little self-help might be a good plan

Luckily for me, my archive of over 500,000 negatives starting with my very first when I was 11 are all still perfectly printable. Just as well, as prints from these are now keeping me in the manner to which I am accustomed - which is a very well manner indeed thank you!  :) A major museum-type institution is also negotiating the purchase of my archive, 'before I pop off', to have after I have gone to the great darkroom and they only want my negatives and any existing prints. Digi files are of no interest for all the reasons stated on this thread.

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Luckily for me, my archive of over 500,000 negatives starting with my very first when I was 11 are all still perfectly printable. Just as well, as prints from these are now keeping me in the manner to which I am accustomed - which is a very well manner indeed thank you!  :) A major museum-type institution is also negotiating the purchase of my archive, 'before I pop off', to have after I have gone to the great darkroom and they only want my negatives and any existing prints. Digi files are of no interest for all the reasons stated on this thread.

 

That's all very well but it's not what the thread is about.

It's a bit like the farmer who, asked for directions, says 'Well, I wouldn't start from here'. The rest of us are where we are.

Anyway, such a large collection of negatives must have its own peculiar storage, backup and readout requirements.

Edited by spacecadet

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My old software is not usable. But with programs such as anything by Adobe,where I had started off with the retail boxed versions of programs but until last year started buying the digital upgrades,I remember one time being asked to 'prove' my software.THat was at least a decade ago...

 

Another thing I've noticed,sometimes with a program we use and loved and if we get access to it again,we realize it was just 'ok' and the newer similar programs are so much better.

 

 

And BTW,I don't think having a lot of stuff is basically a female thing...A few guys I've been in relationships with had houses that were 7000sf and larger and they didn't even have enough closet space for me! Every inch on the bookcases was taken,every corner of the rooms filled with something...

 

I don't collect anything really,but last year I was away from my stuff for a good amount of time and when I came back it felt so claustrophobic having so many things.Getting that book was the kick in the pants to get motivated to pare down so when I want to sell my condo,much of the grunt work will  be behind me.

 

L

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I was listening to a very gloomy piece on Radio 4 this morning about access to old files. As we move along from system to system with upgrade after upgrade we isolate ourselves from old files. Paper copies last centuries with just a few precautions, but some digital correspondence will be very difficult to access after as little as a decade

 

So that seems to make a case for keeping some old software in case it might be useful as a kind of can opener. A redundant Mac or PC in the attic might save the day. That's me being negative again!

 

I used to use WordPerfect for Mac in preference to Microsoft Word. Support for WordPerfect for Macs ended ten years ago. I did go through a lot of files making conversions but I suspect even those are getting towards their end-of-life.

 

Data recovery can be very expensive so a little self-help might be a good plan

Luckily for me, my archive of over 500,000 negatives starting with my very first when I was 11 are all still perfectly printable. Just as well, as prints from these are now keeping me in the manner to which I am accustomed - which is a very well manner indeed thank you!  :) A major museum-type institution is also negotiating the purchase of my archive, 'before I pop off', to have after I have gone to the great darkroom and they only want my negatives and any existing prints. Digi files are of no interest for all the reasons stated on this thread.

 

 

Firstly, congratulations on your success as you have obviously worked very hard to achieve what you have achieved. It's quite rare for somebody to spend their entire life (almost) doing what they love doing most and being financially successful as well.

 

Now for the argumentative bit: I would argue that digital images are far more likely to survive long-term if properly curated. They don't deteriorate physically so, as long as they are saved in an archival file format (dng and tiff are going to be around for a long, long time) and regularly transferred to new media readable by whatever hardware is current, they will remain in absolutely pristine condition. This is not the case for negs and prints which will eventually deteriorate no matter how carefully they are archived and will presumably be digitised eventually anyway. Perhaps in your case, it is the subject matter of the material on film that is of interest to the museum. 

 

Museums must have long-term archiving plans for digital materials and it is unlikely that this stuff will be lost except by accident. It is the ordinary everyday stuff that is really at risk of being lost, mainly through poor storage. I intend to give written instructions for maintaining my digital image archive long-term and hopefully one of my offspring will maintain it for future descendants. 

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And BTW,I don't think having a lot of stuff is basically a female thing...A few guys I've been in relationships with had houses that were 7000sf and larger and they didn't even have enough closet space for me! Every inch on the bookcases was taken,every corner of the rooms filled with something...

 

 

Totally agree. It is nothing to do with gender. 

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I came across some quotes from Jay Maisel. Here are a couple... The first made me laugh.. The second made me think....Couldn't figure out which thread to put this in.....The funny quote belongs here.....

 

“What you’re shooting at doesn’t matter, the real question is: ‘Does it give you joy?’” – Jay Maisel 

 

“If you’re not your own severest critic, you are your own worst enemy.” – Jay Maisel 

 

Paulette

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I came across some quotes from Jay Maisel. Here are a couple... The first made me laugh.. The second made me think....Couldn't figure out which thread to put this in.....The funny quote belongs here.....

 

“What you’re shooting at doesn’t matter, the real question is: ‘Does it give you joy?’” – Jay Maisel 

 

“If you’re not your own severest critic, you are your own worst enemy.” – Jay Maisel 

 

Paulette

Add to his quote..."I can shoot a lot. I have a 72 room house! to store my film in which includes a temperature controlled fireproof bank vault"  :-)

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My BIG software faux pas was purchasing a program around 1990 called,"Official Copyright' which stored all of the names of the photos you were registering and then printed out a nice submission form you'd send with the completed forms and a CD.

 

I did at least 3 submissions with this software and by the time I went to use it again 3 months later they had stopped supporting it even after my system just had a slight upgrade.

 

They quickly went out of business and I'm sure many content creators wanted to kick their little 'developer' butts over this...

 

I would not even remember which old computer and which OS to get if I wanted to.

 

L

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You ladies think you know clutter? A few years ago I won the Clutter of the Year award. I was so proud. But when I brought the statuette home and put it down it immediately got lost in the clutter.  :(

I remember photographer Art Shay(he's in his 90s now) was the winner of 'Home Office Computing' magazine's messiest office. OMG-What a wreck it was!

 

In this recent article,here is a photo of him inside of his place.

 

My place looks like it was arranged by Martha Stewart compared to this!

 

http://www.chicagoreader.com/chicago/art-shay-20th-century-photographer-my-florence/Content?oid=16321301

 

 

L

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The principle reason for the oh-so filthy condition of my digs is to challenge my immune system. 

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