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Mexican food snack ID please


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9 hours ago, geogphotos said:

Thanks for all the help. I'm going to Mexico City later in the year so will keep my eyes open 😃

 

Best to leave your camera at home. There's nothing worth photographing in Mexico. 😝

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Explore the crystal clear waters of Cancun. ...
Visit Yucatán, the heart of the Mayan civilization. ...
Photograph Tulum's history galore. ...
Click the exotic landscape of the Sonoran Desert. ...
Capture the colors and life in Mexico City.
There isn't much.
I like the colors of Mexico.

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13 minutes ago, Jose Decio Molaro said:

Explore the crystal clear waters of Cancun. ...
Visit Yucatán, the heart of the Mayan civilization. ...
Photograph Tulum's history galore. ...
Click the exotic landscape of the Sonoran Desert. ...
Capture the colors and life in Mexico City.
There isn't much.
I like the colors of Mexico.

 

Me too. I love Mexico and have been visiting the country since the 1980's. Actually, I feel more at home there than I do in Canada. There are endless possibilities for photography in Mexico.

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On 12/01/2023 at 18:04, John Mitchell said:

I've seen those for sale in Mexico. They do look like a type of fritter, so perhaps they are buñuelos. Not sure, though. Mexican food is very complex with lots of regional variations and names. 

 

I loved the food in Mexico. And all the restaurants of every cuisine in NYC would close tomorrow if they were to kick out the illegal Mexicans.

 

And Tony, I loved the food in Seville too. 👍

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AT0091.jpg

 

Oldest son exploring San Miguel de Allende c 1990

 

He is marrying a Mexican woman ( Galician family originally) TODAY in London.

 

Party in Mexico City in April. 

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2 hours ago, Jose Decio Molaro said:

I just don't know about security in Mexico...
I believe that in Canada it is safer to photograph

 

Probably, but I didn't have any problems in Mexico in tourist location and was even told by our tour guide that I could photograph police monitoring a demonstration.  I don't photograph street people anywhere, and would not try to photograph anything that looked like a drug deal going down or an arrest (witnessed one in Nicaragua, which is where I live).   Mexico does have stricter laws protecting personal privacy in photos for any sort of publication.   Part of Mexico seem quite safe (US State Department agrees); parts aren't. (US State Department forbid its personnel to go to them).

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I've been all over Mexico. The country has a remarkable bus system that will take you just about anywhere you want to go. I've never had any serious safety problems. Being able to speak Spanish fairly well has helped me get out of a few tight situations. However, corruption and gang violence are common, so you obviously have to be careful. Personally, I've always felt safest away from resort and tourist areas in general, which goes against conventional wisdom. The bad guys tend to follow the money, and tourists are perceived as having lots of that. Photographing anything to do with the military or the police is not a wise idea. In fact, it's best to do what the Mexicans do and avoid the police altogether.

 

 

Edited by John Mitchell
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12 hours ago, geogphotos said:

AT0091.jpg

 

Oldest son exploring San Miguel de Allende c 1990

 

He is marrying a Mexican woman ( Galician family originally) TODAY in London.

 

Party in Mexico City in April. 

 

We may have crossed paths. I used to visit San Miguel every year at that time. Hope you have a wonderful fiesta / party. 🥳

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5 hours ago, John Mitchell said:

 Personally, I've always felt safest away from resort and tourist areas in general, which goes against conventional wisdom. The bad guys tend to follow the money, and tourists are perceived as having lots of that. Photographing anything to do with the military or the police is not a wise idea. In fact, it's best to do what the Mexicans do and avoid the police altogether.

 

 

 

More or less my experience in living in Nicaragua, and a friend's feeling when she traveled Guatemala by bus and felt safe being the only gringa in a 50 mile or more radius than she did in Antigua.    Here the bad guys also follow the festivals.   People get drunk and careless.  

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3 hours ago, geogphotos said:

Chicheran ( sp?) - pork skin - pork scratchings

 

chicharon - very popular here, too.

 

Google image search for them:  https://www.google.com/search?q=chicharon&client=firefox-b-d&sxsrf=AJOqlzWpB1aj1B2yYBxwex9fxkTsT-UjOg:1673799216999&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi-qoT--8n8AhUKjLAFHY1sCsEQ_AUoAXoECAEQAw&biw=1353&bih=682&dpr=1.25

 

The stuff in the photos looks most like Sardinian flatbread.  Arabic food made it to Mexico, and there was regular trade between China and the Philippines and between there and the Pacific Coast of Latin America.   We have a Florentine family in Jinptega with a restaurant named after an anarchist pirate community called Libertalia.   Fried pork skins often are served with yuca.  If it's made of wheat, it's fried flat bread.  If it's pork skin, you can taste that. 

 

Foodies tend to be more concerned about absolute authenticity than cooks. 

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Ian, I would be very surprised if the food in your photo was "fried flour." They're almost certainly sheets of deep-fried pig skin. Mexican vendors here in Pennsylvania will sometimes sell them that way. They'll also cut them up to chip/crisp size too and sell them in plastic bags. I've seen them in Mexico but they wouldn't be my first choice if I were actually in country - there are so many wonderful street snacks there that I make a point of starting in a different place each time I'm there.

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1 hour ago, Brian Yarvin said:

Ian, I would be very surprised if the food in your photo was "fried flour." They're almost certainly sheets of deep-fried pig skin. Mexican vendors here in Pennsylvania will sometimes sell them that way. They'll also cut them up to chip/crisp size too and sell them in plastic bags. I've seen them in Mexico but they wouldn't be my first choice if I were actually in country - there are so many wonderful street snacks there that I make a point of starting in a different place each time I'm there.

 

Yes Brian:

 

'Naomi trying fried flour, Chapultepec Park, Mexico ' was all I had written on this old Kodachrome from 1961.

 

I do have Naomi's phone number ( seriously!) 

 

The name of Mexican pork skin seller is unrecorded.

Edited by geogphotos
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Ian, there are fried sheets of cornmeal paste that could in theory look like that - perhaps corn flour to a speaker of British English. I've never seen them that big though. In the UK, I seem to remember them being sold as "Doritos" - a brand we have here in the States too. I'm sticking with the fried pork skin though. And they were probably fried in one central kitchen and distributed to hundreds or thousands of street vendors later on. 

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7 hours ago, Rebecca Ore said:

Foodies tend to be more concerned about absolute authenticity than cooks. 

Rebecca, while this is true in my experience too, I would like to remind the group that we stock photographers have to be much more concerned with absolute authenticity and proper identification than any food vendor. 

 

Keywords count! Oh boy do they count!

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