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Ed Rooney

Architecture?

Question

There are so many different periods and styles here in Liverpool. I'm wondering if anyone could recommend a good site with pictures that would help me ID some of the buildings I've been capturing? 

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Hi Ed, 

Hope you're enjoying my parents home town. 

There are a couple of Facebook groups that focus on images of Liverpool old and new that may be of use.

Hope that may help.

J

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Posted (edited)

The best architectural guides to the UK are by Pevsner. They are a little hard to fully understand ( in my opinion) but they are comprehensive.

 

Here is the one to Liverpool which you will find in the library or be able to buy for yourself from Amazon or a bookshop: 

 

Liverpool: Pevsner City Guide (Pevsner Architectural Guides: City Guides)

 

As to online sources what I often do is search Google for listed buildings eg) 'listed buildings Liverpool'

 

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/england/liverpool#.XmIKDS2cZBx

 

For Liverpool it breaks the city into wards ( you'll see on the page I link to above) then for each ward/area you can use a map to scroll in to find your building. This is a typical entry, you don't need all the detail but it does tell you the date and the architects. 

 

So you can create a caption along the lines of :

 

"Lansdowne House built 1862 architects Lucy and Littler, mid 19th century office building, Anfield, Liverpool etc...."

 

 

 

Listing Text

SJ 39 SE PRIORY ROAD
L4

4/929 No. 240
(Lansdowne
House)
(formerly listed
14.3.75. under Anfield
Cemetery)

G.V. II

 

Office. Built as registrar's office. c.1862. Lucy and
Littler. Snecked stone,banded slate roof. Irregular plan; 2
storeys and 5 bays. 1st 3 bays have hipped roof and gables
over 2nd and 3rd bay windows, last 2 bays break forward
under gables. Fenestration is irregular, with mullions and
transoms. Entrance in right return has mullioned overlight.
Rear facade return has mullioned overlight. Rear facade has
full-height canted bay windows to end 2 bays.

Edited by geogphotos
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Posted (edited)

Ah so, People -- thank you.

 

As I did when asking about the RX100 batteries, I was focused on the wrong problem. That was the third-party charger not the batteries. This was my building's hopeless WiFi not navagating the Net. 

 

I'm just 7 minutes walk from the Central Library, and I even have a card! But if it looks like I'll be staying in Liverpool (?), I'll buy that book, Ian. Meanwhile, your links will serve well, John. 

 

Facebook? Hmm, I've heard of that. Isn't that what people are looking at when they bump into each other on the street? Or is that Twinker, or Twister, or Scouser? Remember, James, I'm A Stranger in a Stand Land.

 

2APBYCP.jpg

Edited by Ed Rooney

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23 minutes ago, Harry Harrison said:

How about taking one of these Royal Institute of British Architecture (RIBA)  guided tours Ed:

 

https://www.architecture.com/contact-and-visit/riba-north/riba-liverpool-city-tours

 

Thanks for that link Harry. I keep thinking about a trip to Liverpool using my Senior Rail Card. 😀

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Harry, I've been here since last July. I could give one of these tours.

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Sure Ed, I just thought that you could ask the guide what all these buildings were, you'd be teacher's pet! I do have an RIBA guide for London but it's a bit out of date, that's always going to be a problem with such guides with buildings going up so fast.

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16 minutes ago, geogphotos said:

Thanks for that link Harry

No problem, maybe you could start your own tours of Ipswich given its new found status.:)

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This is the elementary school my children attended, 1 1/2 blocks from our home. I spent a lot of time on the Internet researching architecture. Best I came up with is “Collegiate Gothic style”. I think I spent hours at it. If I hadn’t loved the school so much for its looks and family history, I would have given up.
 

KA3ANY.jpg

This is the elementary scoo

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12 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

This is the elementary school my children attended, 1 1/2 blocks from our home. I spent a lot of time on the Internet researching architecture. Best I came up with is “Collegiate Gothic style”. I think I spent hours at it. If I hadn’t loved the school so much for its looks and family history, I would have given up.
 

KA3ANY.jpg

This is the elementary scoo

 

Have you noted the spelling error Betty?

 

scoo?

 

Allan

 

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You can often track down tricky ones just by googling the street address. Most of the Victorian ones are some sort of revival style- Classical, Gothic, Renaissance that sort of thing.

Here's the Grand Hotel, 1906, by Horace Field, Edwardian Renaissance revival style

RKFE7A.jpg

You'll have seen plenty of Gothic Revival like this

RKBBFH.jpg

or Manchester Town Hall, likewise

H2AGH4.jpg

 

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Try Google Maps. I usually take a reference photo of the street name before taking pictures and then it's relatively easy to track down what the buildings are.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Have you noted the spelling error Betty?

 

scoo?

 

Allan

 

No I didn’t, Allan. Good catch! 😘Ok, the error was a mistake in text after uploading the picture. I thought that was gone when I put the text above, lol. The attributes are good in AIM.

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Boy, I'm in over my head with my architecture pics. I need to treat them (like the one above) separately from my other stock captures. I'm showing a mix of several architectural styles. I need to put them in a folder and do all the captions and tags research before I submit them. I usually do the tags after my pics pass QC. I've got a mess on my hands here. 

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It's not a huge deal, Ed, just another category. You cracked it with food, this is just something else.

For example, the church on your first page- I'd call that Gothic Revival but I'd also put in Venetian because of the shape of those ogee arches.

The domed church, the one that looks like St. Paul's in London- Renaissance revival. The skyscraper- post modern or high-tech. Next to it a brutalist concrete block- my favourite. Same for the Museum.

2B5DW78 Romanesque revival, or just Edwardian (a guess). The one with the golden dome- neo-Classical. Off you go. You only need a few specific tags. Never too late to learn.

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23 hours ago, spacecadet said:

It's not a huge deal, Ed, just another category. You cracked it with food, this is just something else.

For example, the church on your first page- I'd call that Gothic Revival but I'd also put in Venetian because of the shape of those ogee arches.

The domed church, the one that looks like St. Paul's in London- Renaissance revival. The skyscraper- post modern or high-tech. Next to it a brutalist concrete block- my favourite. Same for the Museum.

2B5DW78 Romanesque revival, or just Edwardian (a guess). The one with the golden dome- neo-Classical. Off you go. You only need a few specific tags. Never too late to learn.

How very nice of you, Mark. Please come and tag mine! 😉

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Yes, Betty, Mark has always been a valuable support to me -- a prince among men. 

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Posted (edited)

Aw shucks.

It's not often anyone says anything that nice about me- outside the forum anyways. Thanks, Ed. A pleasure as always.

Look after yourself and wash your hands a lot.😉

Edited by spacecadet
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Researching architectural styles can be time-consuming (very odd term, that) but I think it's well worth the effort. Architecture always has been one of my best performing categories. I'm sure that's the case with a lot of other contributors as well. It looks as if Liverpool has a wealth of well-preserved historical architecture. Here in Vancouver, what little remains is under constant threat from real-estate developers, most of whom can only see $ signs.

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I'm quite surprised to find that architecture, interpreting the category widely, accounts for 40% of my volume. So keep it up, Ed.

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12 minutes ago, spacecadet said:

I'm quite surprised to find that architecture, interpreting the category widely, accounts for 40% of my volume. So keep it up, Ed.

 

Same here, at least 40% of my sales are architectural in one way or another.

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43 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

Researching architectural styles can be time-consuming (very odd term, that) but I think it's well worth the effort. Architecture always has been one of my best performing categories. I'm sure that's the case with a lot of other contributors as well. It looks as if Liverpool has a wealth of well-preserved historical architecture. Here in Vancouver, what little remains is under constant threat from real-estate developers, most of whom can only see $ signs.

That’s a pet peeve of mine, too. Just like our beautiful old wooden barns being allowed to collapse and putting up those horrendous metal replacements. 

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the-three-graces-buildings-royal-liver-b

 

That dome that looks like St. Paul's in London, Mark, (and it really does) is on top of the Port of Liverpool Building, one of the Three Graces.  

 

I'm glad I asked this question because I've been seriously neglecting this important stock subject. What I've found visually exciting in this city is the dramatic mix of so many styles of architecture. Seville is a whole other thing with the entire city done in the same beautiful Spanish style with just one or two exceptions. 

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14 hours ago, Ed Rooney said:

the-three-graces-buildings-royal-liver-b

 

That dome that looks like St. Paul's in London, Mark, (and it really does) is on top of the Port of Liverpool Building, one of the Three Graces.  

 

I'm glad I asked this question because I've been seriously neglecting this important stock subject. What I've found visually exciting in this city is the dramatic mix of so many styles of architecture. Seville is a whole other thing with the entire city done in the same beautiful Spanish style with just one or two exceptions. 

Ed, this makes for interesting reading about the Port of Liverpool building.

http://www.helixproperty.co.uk/latest-news/building-spotlight-the-port-of-liverpool-building-

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