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Change in emphasis by The Guardian for illustrating Climate Journalism


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The concern over how best to depict the climate emergency led us to seek advice from the research organisation Climate Visuals, who have found that “images that define climate change shape the way it is understood and acted upon”.

https://climatevisuals.org/7-climate-visuals-principles

 

https://climatevisuals.org/about

towards the end: Paid partnerships: Alamy

 

wim

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I trust that they will also consider making fair payments to photographers - my guess is some of those used in the article, judging from the source, won't be returning much to the photographers who have created such powerful images.

 

How much did the author get paid compared with the photographers?

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It smacks of propaganda.

The newspapers should not be guiding the narrative, they should be reporting unbiased evidence from all sources.

A recent flooding story in the UK spoke of 'biblical floods' never seen before on the Isle of Man, but a short Google search showed that the most destructive floods in the Island in living memory occurred on the night of September 17th-18th 1930.

We'll stop using polar bears because in actual fact they are thriving, but if you show proof, you may be sacked.
https://business.financialpost.com/opinion/was-this-zoologist-punished-for-telling-school-kids-politically-incorrect-facts-about-polar-bears?fbclid=IwAR0hbETOcMkbLB9Zd0Nhc3BEFwwC3ZXjz1jXAv3TC8RIHMuW7mgNBwXT7Rg

 

The Arctic ocean is warming up, icebergs are growing scarcer and in some places the seals are finding the water too hot, according to a report to the Commerce Department yesterday from Consulafft, at Bergen, Norway.

Reports from fishermen, seal hunters and explorers all point to a radical change in climate conditions and hitherto unheard-of temperatures in the Arctic zone. Exploration expeditions report that scarcely any ice has been met as far north as 81 degrees 29 minutes. Soundings to a depth of 3,100 meters showed the gulf stream still very warm. Great masses of ice have been replaced by moraines of earth and stones, the report continued, while at many points well known glaciers have entirely disappeared.

Very few seals and no white fish are found in the eastern Arctic, while vast shoals of herring and smelts which have never before ventured so far north, are being encountered in the old seal fishing grounds.

 


This report was from November 2, 1922. As reported by the AP and published in The Washington Post.

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5 hours ago, wiskerke said:

The concern over how best to depict the climate emergency led us to seek advice from the research organisation Climate Visuals, who have found that “images that define climate change shape the way it is understood and acted upon”.

https://climatevisuals.org/7-climate-visuals-principles

 

https://climatevisuals.org/about

towards the end: Paid partnerships: Alamy

 

wim


Paid partnership... Alamy, but at the beginning of the article... "Each image is linked to its original source and many are available to download for free under Creative Commons licenses for use in blogs, articles and campaigns."

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19 minutes ago, mickfly said:


Paid partnership... Alamy, but at the beginning of the article... "Each image is linked to its original source and many are available to download for free under Creative Commons licenses for use in blogs, articles and campaigns."

 

I would never and have never ever anywhere marked any of my images with a creative commons license. Smaller agencies hoover them up sell sell via the larger agencies. The intention as I understand is that the creative commons licenses are for non commercial use, but this is commonly abused. Why do photographers give away their images?

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41 minutes ago, sb photos said:

 

I would never and have never ever anywhere marked any of my images with a creative commons license. Smaller agencies hoover them up sell sell via the larger agencies. The intention as I understand is that the creative commons licenses are for non commercial use, but this is commonly abused. Why do photographers give away their images?

There are allowances for commercial use in creative commons... Flickr has many with that licence, and there are a lot of sites which are entirely filled with them (some of them not giving the correct attribution)... all for free!
I'm just surprised that as a paid partner Alamy are happy with them pushing freebies.

Edited by mickfly
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3 hours ago, mickfly said:


Paid partnership... Alamy, but at the beginning of the article... "Each image is linked to its original source and many are available to download for free under Creative Commons licenses for use in blogs, articles and campaigns."

 

I have no idea what it means either. Leafing through the images I still have to find the first one from Alamy. The agency Cavan, which is on CV, however is on Alamy. I think it used to be called Aurora.

I like reading the explanations with the images. They do give food for thought. And it's refreshing they are not just not going for the easy imagery, but trying to counter it. My guess is that they will get very little traction in the UK. At least in the mainstream press. Maybe in government magazines. Which would not be that bad, because they tend to pay better.

 

wim

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On 21/10/2019 at 13:55, geogphotos said:

I trust that they will also consider making fair payments to photographers - my guess is some of those used in the article, judging from the source, won't be returning much to the photographers who have created such powerful images.

 

How much did the author get paid compared with the photographers?

well very often someone on a good pay sitting in a nice office, will expect Free Images, as for them its just a tool, and who respects cheep tools ?,  also you have Panos Pictures, Magnum, who have been doing this stuff for 20 years plus, so there are already organizations, FOE, Greenpeace, WWF, that have media departments dealing with this stuff,

 

Yours Dylan 

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12 minutes ago, Dylan B Garcia Art Photography said:

well very often someone on a good pay sitting in a nice office, will expect Free Images, as for them its just a tool, and who respects cheep tools ?,  also you have Panos Pictures, Magnum, who have been doing this stuff for 20 years plus, so there are already organizations, FOE, Greenpeace, WWF, that have media departments dealing with this stuff,

 

Yours Dylan 

 

 

And if you look at the photos used in the article you'll see one from Shutterstock and a couple from Getty where if under Premium Access the photographer would be lucky to get enough to buy a pack of gum.

 

What about the Guardian extending their admirable philosophies about fairness and sustainability to ensure that photographers are fairly treated and properly rewarded?

Edited by geogphotos
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5 hours ago, sooth said:

I'm just surprised that as a paid partner Alamy are happy with them pushing freebies

 

gimme a f break.  

 

 

the fight to counter climate change is more important than you or I getting paid.

I'm so pleased that in your exalted position you don't have to worry about getting paid, but I do, thanks very much.

Remember this is a professional forum and you can campaign in any number of places.

Edited by spacecadet
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On 23/10/2019 at 05:32, sooth said:

I'm just surprised that as a paid partner Alamy are happy with them pushing freebies

 

gimme a f break.  

 

 

the fight to counter climate change is more important than you or I getting paid.


Have a look at this...

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/08/explore-through-the-lens-starving-polar-bear-photo/?fbclid=IwAR21CQt-AbARpS7gyuyauZKDfmW7vC0AJphtqIVMo3CoAA0wlriKWmSmfD8
Maybe this is they they are trying to avoid the 'All polar bears are dying' kind of pictures.
As an aside, the more I watch Attenborough type programmes, the more I see the fakery involved in the filming.

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28 minutes ago, mickfly said:


Have a look at this...

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/08/explore-through-the-lens-starving-polar-bear-photo/?fbclid=IwAR21CQt-AbARpS7gyuyauZKDfmW7vC0AJphtqIVMo3CoAA0wlriKWmSmfD8
Maybe this is they they are trying to avoid the 'All polar bears are dying' kind of pictures.
As an aside, the more I watch Attenborough type programmes, the more I see the fakery involved in the filming.

 

 

The article makes this very clear. They want to focus on the way people are being affected by climate change because the polar bears stories have become cliched and are too distant from people's lives. 

 

People understand the impacts of climate change more directly when it shows how other humans are having their lives changed by environmental processes such as desertification, acidification, atmospheric pollution, deforestation, loss of glaciers and ice sheets, changing weather pattern and increasing storm intensity, rising sea levels, changes to agricultural systems, species loss, spread of invasive species, and so on. 

Edited by geogphotos
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1 hour ago, geogphotos said:

 

 

The article makes this very clear. They want to focus on the way people are being affected by climate change because the polar bears stories have become cliched and are too distant from people's lives. 

 

 

Which is a good thing, as myself I am not likely to be in a position to photograph polar bears in the wild. Photographing climate effected people or conditions in the UK is always a possibility.

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On 25/10/2019 at 13:13, geogphotos said:

 

 

The article makes this very clear. They want to focus on the way people are being affected by climate change because the polar bears stories have become cliched and are too distant from people's lives. 

 

People understand the impacts of climate change more directly when it shows how other humans are having their lives changed by environmental processes such as desertification, acidification, atmospheric pollution, deforestation, loss of glaciers and ice sheets, changing weather pattern and increasing storm intensity, rising sea levels, changes to agricultural systems, species loss, spread of invasive species, and so on. 

They were caught out with the lies about the polar bear pictures, that's why they are changing tack.

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